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Cape May (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
d the establishment of home manufactures, commissioned Brigadier-General Folsom first commander, and provided for the issue of bills of credit. On May 2, 1775, the provincial committee of correspondence of New Jersey directed the chairman to summon a Provincial Congress of deputies to meet in Trenton, on the 23d of that month. Thirteen counties were represented—namely, Bergen, Essex, Middlesex, Morris, Somerset, Sussex, Monmouth, Hunterdon, Burlington, Gloucester, Cumberland, Salem, and Cape May. Hendrick Fisher was chosen president; Johathan D. Sargent secretary; and William Paterson and Frederick Frelinghuysen assistants. The Provincial Assembly had been called (May 15) by Governor Franklin to consider North's conciliatory proposition. They declined to approve it, or to take any decisive step in the matter, except with the consent of the Continental Congress, then in session. They adjourned a few days afterwards, and never met again. Royal authority was at an end in New Je
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
opriated. A receiver-general, Henry Gardiner, was appointed, into whose hands the constables and taxcollectors were directed to pay all moneys received by them. They made provision for arming the province, and appointed Jeremiah Preble, Artemas Ward, and Seth Pomeroy general officers of the militia. They also authorized the enrolment of 12,000 minute-men, and, assuming both legislative and executive powers, received the allegiance of the people generally. So passed away royal rule in Massachusetts, and the sovereignty of the people was established in the form of the Provincial Congress. Gage issued a proclamation denouncing their proceedings, to which no attention was paid. The Provincial Congress of New Hampshire assembled at Exeter, on May 17, 1775, when ninety-eight counties, towns, parishes, and boroughs were represented by deputies. Matthew Thornton was chosen president, and Eleazar Thompson secretary. They established a post-office at Portsmouth, provided for procuring
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
emiah Preble, Artemas Ward, and Seth Pomeroy general officers of the militia. They also authorized the enrolment of 12,000 minute-men, and, assuming both legislative and executive powers, received the allegiance of the people generally. So passed away royal rule in Massachusetts, and the sovereignty of the people was established in the form of the Provincial Congress. Gage issued a proclamation denouncing their proceedings, to which no attention was paid. The Provincial Congress of New Hampshire assembled at Exeter, on May 17, 1775, when ninety-eight counties, towns, parishes, and boroughs were represented by deputies. Matthew Thornton was chosen president, and Eleazar Thompson secretary. They established a post-office at Portsmouth, provided for procuring arms, recommended the establishment of home manufactures, commissioned Brigadier-General Folsom first commander, and provided for the issue of bills of credit. On May 2, 1775, the provincial committee of correspondence of
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
ompson secretary. They established a post-office at Portsmouth, provided for procuring arms, recommended the establishment of home manufactures, commissioned Brigadier-General Folsom first commander, and provided for the issue of bills of credit. On May 2, 1775, the provincial committee of correspondence of New Jersey directed the chairman to summon a Provincial Congress of deputies to meet in Trenton, on the 23d of that month. Thirteen counties were represented—namely, Bergen, Essex, Middlesex, Morris, Somerset, Sussex, Monmouth, Hunterdon, Burlington, Gloucester, Cumberland, Salem, and Cape May. Hendrick Fisher was chosen president; Johathan D. Sargent secretary; and William Paterson and Frederick Frelinghuysen assistants. The Provincial Assembly had been called (May 15) by Governor Franklin to consider North's conciliatory proposition. They declined to approve it, or to take any decisive step in the matter, except with the consent of the Continental Congress, then in sess
Ulster County (New York, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
e Provincial Congress adopted measures for organizing the militia and issuing $50,000 in bills of credit for the payment of extraordinary expenses. On the recommendation of the committee of sixty of the city of New York, delegates chosen in a majority of the counties of the province met at the Exchange in New York, May 22, 1775. They adjourned to the next day, in order to have a more complete representation, when delegates appeared from the following counties: New York, Albany, Dutchess, Ulster, Orange, Westchester, Kings, Suffolk, and Richmond. The Congress was organized by the appointment of Peter Van Brugh Livingston, president; Volkert P. Douw, vice-president; John McKesson and Robert Benson, secretaries; and Thomas Petit, door-keeper. They forwarded to the Continental Congress a financial scheme, devised by Gouverneur Morris, for the defence of the colonies by the issue of a Continental paper currency, substantially the same as that afterwards adopted. They also took measur
Dutchess county (New York, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
rsey. The Provincial Congress adopted measures for organizing the militia and issuing $50,000 in bills of credit for the payment of extraordinary expenses. On the recommendation of the committee of sixty of the city of New York, delegates chosen in a majority of the counties of the province met at the Exchange in New York, May 22, 1775. They adjourned to the next day, in order to have a more complete representation, when delegates appeared from the following counties: New York, Albany, Dutchess, Ulster, Orange, Westchester, Kings, Suffolk, and Richmond. The Congress was organized by the appointment of Peter Van Brugh Livingston, president; Volkert P. Douw, vice-president; John McKesson and Robert Benson, secretaries; and Thomas Petit, door-keeper. They forwarded to the Continental Congress a financial scheme, devised by Gouverneur Morris, for the defence of the colonies by the issue of a Continental paper currency, substantially the same as that afterwards adopted. They also to
Burlington (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
mouth, provided for procuring arms, recommended the establishment of home manufactures, commissioned Brigadier-General Folsom first commander, and provided for the issue of bills of credit. On May 2, 1775, the provincial committee of correspondence of New Jersey directed the chairman to summon a Provincial Congress of deputies to meet in Trenton, on the 23d of that month. Thirteen counties were represented—namely, Bergen, Essex, Middlesex, Morris, Somerset, Sussex, Monmouth, Hunterdon, Burlington, Gloucester, Cumberland, Salem, and Cape May. Hendrick Fisher was chosen president; Johathan D. Sargent secretary; and William Paterson and Frederick Frelinghuysen assistants. The Provincial Assembly had been called (May 15) by Governor Franklin to consider North's conciliatory proposition. They declined to approve it, or to take any decisive step in the matter, except with the consent of the Continental Congress, then in session. They adjourned a few days afterwards, and never met a
Suffolk County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
s for organizing the militia and issuing $50,000 in bills of credit for the payment of extraordinary expenses. On the recommendation of the committee of sixty of the city of New York, delegates chosen in a majority of the counties of the province met at the Exchange in New York, May 22, 1775. They adjourned to the next day, in order to have a more complete representation, when delegates appeared from the following counties: New York, Albany, Dutchess, Ulster, Orange, Westchester, Kings, Suffolk, and Richmond. The Congress was organized by the appointment of Peter Van Brugh Livingston, president; Volkert P. Douw, vice-president; John McKesson and Robert Benson, secretaries; and Thomas Petit, door-keeper. They forwarded to the Continental Congress a financial scheme, devised by Gouverneur Morris, for the defence of the colonies by the issue of a Continental paper currency, substantially the same as that afterwards adopted. They also took measures for enlisting four regiments for
Cumberland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
uring arms, recommended the establishment of home manufactures, commissioned Brigadier-General Folsom first commander, and provided for the issue of bills of credit. On May 2, 1775, the provincial committee of correspondence of New Jersey directed the chairman to summon a Provincial Congress of deputies to meet in Trenton, on the 23d of that month. Thirteen counties were represented—namely, Bergen, Essex, Middlesex, Morris, Somerset, Sussex, Monmouth, Hunterdon, Burlington, Gloucester, Cumberland, Salem, and Cape May. Hendrick Fisher was chosen president; Johathan D. Sargent secretary; and William Paterson and Frederick Frelinghuysen assistants. The Provincial Assembly had been called (May 15) by Governor Franklin to consider North's conciliatory proposition. They declined to approve it, or to take any decisive step in the matter, except with the consent of the Continental Congress, then in session. They adjourned a few days afterwards, and never met again. Royal authority w
Childsburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry provincial-congresses
ies, or by a general congress, specially called for that purpose. But this plan met with little favor, and in time the Provincial Congress of New York became more thoroughly patriotic. It showed hesitation, however, in several important emergencies, especially in the matter of declaring the independence of the colonies. It ceased to exist in the summer of 1777, when a State government was organized. On Aug. 21, 1775, a Provincial Congress, consisting of 184 deputies, assembled at Hillsboro, N. C. They first declared their determination to protect the Regulators, who were liable to punishment; declared Governor Martin's proclamation to have a tendency to stir up tumult and insurrection in the province dangerous to the King's government, and directed it to be publicly burned by the common hangman. They provided for raising troops; authorized the raising, in addition to a regular force, of ten battalions, to be called minute-men, and they authorized the emission of bills of credit
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