hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 18 total hits in 9 results.

Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry ream-s-station-battle-of
Ream's Station, battle of. When, in 1864, Warren proceeded to strike the Weldon road, Hancock, who had been called from the north side of the James, followed close in his rear, and on Aug. 21 struck the railway north of Ream's station and destroyed the track for several miles. He formed an intrenched camp at Ream's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the m
National (Nevada, United States) (search for this): entry ream-s-station-battle-of
ad been called from the north side of the James, followed close in his rear, and on Aug. 21 struck the railway north of Ream's station and destroyed the track for several miles. He formed an intrenched camp at Ream's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the men, 1,700 were made prisoners. Hill's loss was not much less; and he, too, withdrew from Ream's station.
Ream's Station, battle of. When, in 1864, Warren proceeded to strike the Weldon road, Hancock, who had been called from the north side of the James, followed close in his rear, and on Aug. 21 struck the railway north of Ream's station and destroyed the track for several miles. He formed an intrenched camp at Ream's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the m
roceeded to strike the Weldon road, Hancock, who had been called from the north side of the James, followed close in his rear, and on Aug. 21 struck the railway north of Ream's station and destroyed the track for several miles. He formed an intrenched camp at Ream's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the men, 1,700 were made prisoners. Hill's loss was not muc
m's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry thHill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the woHill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the men, 1,700 were made prisoners. Hill's loss was not much less; and hetionals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the men, 1,700 were made prisoners. Hill's loss was not much less; and he, too, withdrew from Ream's station.
Ream's Station, battle of. When, in 1864, Warren proceeded to strike the Weldon road, Hancock, who had been called from the north side of the James, followed close in his rear, and on Aug. 21 struck the railway north of Ream's station and destroyed the track for several miles. He formed an intrenched camp at Ream's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This wa A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the men, 1,700 were made prisoners. Hill's loss was not much less; and he, too, withdrew from Ream's station.
Ream's Station, battle of. When, in 1864, Warren proceeded to strike the Weldon road, Hancock, who had been called from the north side of the James, followed close in his rear, and on Aug. 21 struck the railway north of Ream's station and destroyed the track for several miles. He formed an intrenched camp at Ream's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the m
Ream's Station, battle of. When, in 1864, Warren proceeded to strike the Weldon road, Hancock, who had been called from the north side of the James, followed close in his rear, and on Aug. 21 struck the railway north of Ream's station and destroyed the track for several miles. He formed an intrenched camp at Ream's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the
Ream's Station, battle of. When, in 1864, Warren proceeded to strike the Weldon road, Hancock, who had been called from the north side of the James, followed close in his rear, and on Aug. 21 struck the railway north of Ream's station and destroyed the track for several miles. He formed an intrenched camp at Ream's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the m