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New England (United States) (search for this): entry ripley-george
Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 1823, and Cambridge Divinity School in 1826; became pastor of the Thirteenth Congregational (Unitarian) Church in Boston; George Ripley. and was prominent in the Brook farm Association (q. v.) In 1840-41 he was associate editor with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
Greenfield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry ripley-george
Ripley, George 1802-1880 Editor; born in Greenfield, Mass., Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 1823, and Cambridge Divinity School in 1826; became pastor of the Thirteenth Congregational (Unitarian) Church in Boston; George Ripley. and was prominent in the Brook farm Association (q. v.) In 1840-41 he was associate editor with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and
Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 1823, and Cambridge Divinity School in 1826; became pastor of the Thirteenth Congregational (Unitarian) Church in Boston; George Ripley. and was prominent in the Brook farm Association (q. v.) In 1840-41 he was associate editor with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 1823, and Cambridge Divinity School in 1826; became pastor of the Thirteenth Congregational (Unitarian) Church in Boston; George Ripley. and was prominent in the Brook farm Association (q. v.) In 1840-41 he was associate editor with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
Nathaniel Appleton (search for this): entry ripley-george
Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 1823, and Cambridge Divinity School in 1826; became pastor of the Thirteenth Congregational (Unitarian) Church in Boston; George Ripley. and was prominent in the Brook farm Association (q. v.) In 1840-41 he was associate editor with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
Charles Anderson Dana (search for this): entry ripley-george
hurch in Boston; George Ripley. and was prominent in the Brook farm Association (q. v.) In 1840-41 he was associate editor with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley ediRalph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
New American Cyclopaedia (search for this): entry ripley-george
Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 1823, and Cambridge Divinity School in 1826; became pastor of the Thirteenth Congregational (Unitarian) Church in Boston; George Ripley. and was prominent in the Brook farm Association (q. v.) In 1840-41 he was associate editor with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 1823, and Cambridge Divinity School in 1826; became pastor of the Thirteenth Congregational (Unitarian) Church in Boston; George Ripley. and was prominent in the Brook farm Association (q. v.) In 1840-41 he was associate editor with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
Ripley, George 1802-1880 Editor; born in Greenfield, Mass., Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 182lists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-6Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
Oct. 3, 1802; was an able writer and a most industrious man of letters, having edited, translated, and written numerous works on a great variety of subjects, and gained a wide reputation as a scholar, editor, and journalist. He graduated at Harvard University in 1823, and Cambridge Divinity School in 1826; became pastor of the Thirteenth Congregational (Unitarian) Church in Boston; George Ripley. and was prominent in the Brook farm Association (q. v.) In 1840-41 he was associate editor with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller of the Dial, the organ of the New England Transcendentalists; and with Charles A. Dana, Parke Godwin, and J. S. Dwight, of the Harbinger, an advocate of socialism as propounded by Fourier. From 1849 until his death Mr. Ripley was the literary editor of the New York Tribune. In conjunction with Charles A. Dana, Dr. Ripley edited Appleton's New American Cyclopaedia (16 volumes, 1857-63), and a new edition (1873-76). He died in New York City, July 4, 1880.
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