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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 37 total hits in 17 results.

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America (Netherlands) (search for this): entry rivington-james
Rivington, James 1724- Journalist; born in London, England, about 1724; was engaged in bookselling in London, and failing, came to America in 1760, and established a book-store in Philadelphia the same year. In 1761 he opened one near the foot of Wall Street, New York, where his New York Gazeteer, a weekly newspaper, was established in April, 1773. It was soon devoted to the royal cause, and his trenchant paragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added good-natured ridicule. Isaac Sears, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, was so irritated by him that. with a company of light-horsemen from Connecticut, he destroyed Rivington's printing establishment in November, 1775, after which the latter went to England. Walnut Street front of the State-House. (from an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new printing materials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry rivington-james
in 1760, and established a book-store in Philadelphia the same year. In 1761 he opened one near the foot of Wall Street, New York, where his New York Gazeteer, a weekly newspaper, was established in April, 1773. It was soon devoted to the royal cause, and his trenchant paragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added good-natured ridicule. Isaac Sears, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, was so irritated by him that. with a company of light-horsemen from Connecticut, he destroyed Rivington's printing establishment in November, 1775, after which the latter went to England. Walnut Street front of the State-House. (from an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new printing materials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper under the title of Rivington's New York loyal gazette. Late in the year he changed it to Royal gazette. Shrewd and unscrupulous, after the def
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry rivington-james
Rivington, James 1724- Journalist; born in London, England, about 1724; was engaged in bookselling in London, and failing, came to America in 1760, and established a book-store in Philadelphia the same year. In 1761 he opened one near the foot of Wall Street, New York, where his New York Gazeteer, a weekly newspaper, was established in April, 1773. It was soon devoted to the royal cause, and his trenchant paragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added -natured ridicule. Isaac Sears, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, was so irritated by him that. with a company of light-horsemen from Connecticut, he destroyed Rivington's printing establishment in November, 1775, after which the latter went to England. Walnut Street front of the State-House. (from an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new printing materials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper und
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry rivington-james
Rivington, James 1724- Journalist; born in London, England, about 1724; was engaged in bookselling in London, and failing, came to America in 1760, and established a book-store in Philadelphia the same year. In 1761 he opened one near the foot of Wall Street, New York, where his New York Gazeteer, a weekly newspaper, was established in April, 1773. It was soon devoted to the royal cause, and his trenchant paragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added gLondon, and failing, came to America in 1760, and established a book-store in Philadelphia the same year. In 1761 he opened one near the foot of Wall Street, New York, where his New York Gazeteer, a weekly newspaper, was established in April, 1773. It was soon devoted to the royal cause, and his trenchant paragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added good-natured ridicule. Isaac Sears, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, was so irritated by him that. with a company of light-horsemen from Connecticut, he destroyed Rivington's printing establishment in November, 1775, after which the latter went to England. Walnut Street front of the State-House. (from an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new printing materials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper u
ournalist; born in London, England, about 1724; was engaged in bookselling in London, and failing, came to America in 1760, and established a book-store in Philadelphia the same year. In 1761 he opened one near the foot of Wall Street, New York, where his New York Gazeteer, a weekly newspaper, was established in April, 1773. It was soon devoted to the royal cause, and his trenchant paragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added good-natured ridicule. Isaac Sears, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, was so irritated by him that. with a company of light-horsemen from Connecticut, he destroyed Rivington's printing establishment in November, 1775, after which the latter went to England. Walnut Street front of the State-House. (from an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new printing materials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper under the title of Rivington'
Baltimore Washington (search for this): entry rivington-james
m an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new printing materials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper under the title of Rivington's New York loyal gazette. Late in the year he changed it to Royal gazette. Shrewd and unscrupulous, after the defeat of Cornwallis (1781), he perceived the hopelessness of the royal cause and endeavored to make his peace with the Whigs by secretly sending information to Washington concerning public affairs in the city. This treason was practised until the evacuation of the city by the British. When the loyalists fled and the American army entered the city (1783), Rivington remained unharmed, to the astonishment of those not in the secret. He changed the title of his paper to Rivington's New York gazette and universal Advertiser. But his business declined, as he had lost the confidence of both Whigs and Tories, and he lived in comparative poverty until his death
Rivington, James 1724- Journalist; born in London, England, about 1724; was engaged in bookselling in London, and failing, came to America in 1760, and establishby him that. with a company of light-horsemen from Connecticut, he destroyed Rivington's printing establishment in November, 1775, after which the latter went to Ent Street front of the State-House. (from an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new paterials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper under the title of Rivington's New York loyal gazette. Late in the year he changed it to Royal gazette. tish. When the loyalists fled and the American army entered the city (1783), Rivington remained unharmed, to the astonishment of those not in the secret. He changed the title of his paper to Rivington's New York gazette and universal Advertiser. But his business declined, as he had lost the confidence of both Whigs and Tories
Rivington, James 1724- Journalist; born in London, England, about 1724; was engaged in bookselling in London, and failing, came to America in 1760, and established a book-store in Philadelphia the same year. In 1761 he opened one near the foot of Wall Street, New York, where his New York Gazeteer, a weekly newspaper, was established in April, 1773. It was soon devoted to the royal cause, and his trenchant paragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added g1724; was engaged in bookselling in London, and failing, came to America in 1760, and established a book-store in Philadelphia the same year. In 1761 he opened one near the foot of Wall Street, New York, where his New York Gazeteer, a weekly newspaper, was established in April, 1773. It was soon devoted to the royal cause, and his trenchant paragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added good-natured ridicule. Isaac Sears, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, was so irritated by him that. with a company of light-horsemen from Connecticut, he destroyed Rivington's printing establishment in November, 1775, after which the latter went to England. Walnut Street front of the State-House. (from an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new printing materials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper u
ragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added good-natured ridicule. Isaac Sears, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, was so irritated by him that. with a company of light-horsemen from Connecticut, he destroyed Rivington's printing establishment in November, 1775, after which the latter went to England. Walnut Street front of the State-House. (from an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new printing materials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper under the title of Rivington's New York loyal gazette. Late in the year he changed it to Royal gazette. Shrewd and unscrupulous, after the defeat of Cornwallis (1781), he perceived the hopelessness of the royal cause and endeavored to make his peace with the Whigs by secretly sending information to Washington concerning public affairs in the city. This treason was practised until the evacuation of the city by the
Rivington, James 1724- Journalist; born in London, England, about 1724; was engaged in bookselling in London, and failing, came to America in 1760, and established a book-store in Philadelphia the same year. In 1761 he opened one near the foot of Wall Street, New York, where his New York Gazeteer, a weekly newspaper, was established in April, 1773. It was soon devoted to the royal cause, and his trenchant paragraphs against the rebels made him detested by the Whigs. To sarcasm he added good-natured ridicule. Isaac Sears, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, was so irritated by him that. with a company of light-horsemen from Connecticut, he destroyed Rivington's printing establishment in November, 1775, after which the latter went to England. Walnut Street front of the State-House. (from an old print of the period.) James Rivington. Appointed king's printer in New York, he returned late in 1776 with new printing materials, and in 1777 resumed the publication of his paper u
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