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Oswego (New York, United States) (search for this): entry sandy-creek-battle-of
elt in the spring of 1814, to have the Superior, ship-of-war, built at Sackett's Harbor, hastened for sea, lest Sir James L. Yeo would roam over Lake Ontario the unrestricted lord of the waters. Heavy guns and cables destined for her were yet at Oswego. The roads were almost impassable, and the blockade of Sackett's Harbor made a voyage thither by water a perilous one. The gallant master-commander, M. T. Woolsey, declared his willingness to attempt carrying the ordnance and naval stores to Stony Creek, 3 miles from Sackett's Harbor, where they might reach Commodore Chauncey in safety. On May 19 Woolsey was at Oswego with nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilla went out of the harbor at twilight, bearing Major Appling, with 130 riflemen. About the same number of Oneida Indians agreed to meet the flotilla at the mouth of Big Salmon River, and traverse the shore abreast the vessels, to assist in repelling any attack. Woolsey found it unsafe to attemp
Sackett's Harbor (New York, United States) (search for this): entry sandy-creek-battle-of
Creek, battle of. There was great anxiety felt in the spring of 1814, to have the Superior, ship-of-war, built at Sackett's Harbor, hastened for sea, lest Sir James L. Yeo would roam over Lake Ontario the unrestricted lord of the waters. Heavy guns and cables destined for her were yet at Oswego. The roads were almost impassable, and the blockade of Sackett's Harbor made a voyage thither by water a perilous one. The gallant master-commander, M. T. Woolsey, declared his willingness to attempt carrying the ordnance and naval stores to Stony Creek, 3 miles from Sackett's Harbor, where they might reach Commodore Chauncey in safety. On May 19 Woolsey was at Oswego with nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilllsey's boats were stationed some cavalry, artillery, and infantry, with field-pieces, which had been sent there from Sackett's Harbor. The confident Britons, sure of success, pushed up the sinuous creek with their vessels, and strong flanking partie
Sandy Creek, battle of. There was great anxiety felt in the spring of 1814, to have the Superior, ship-of-war, built at Sackett's Harbor, hastened for sea, lest Sir James L. Yeo would roam over Lake Ontario the unrestricted lord of the waters. Heavy guns and cables destined for her were yet at Oswego. The roads were almost impassable, and the blockade of Sackett's Harbor made a voyage thither by water a perilous one. The gallant master-commander, M. T. Woolsey, declared his willingness to attempt carrying the ordnance and naval stores to Stony Creek, 3 miles from Sackett's Harbor, where they might reach Commodore Chauncey in safety. On May 19 Woolsey was at Oswego with nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilla went out of the harbor at twilight, bearing Major Appling, with 130 riflemen. About the same number of Oneida Indians agreed to meet the flotilla at the mouth of Big Salmon River, and traverse the shore abreast the vessels, to assist in re
Stony Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry sandy-creek-battle-of
The roads were almost impassable, and the blockade of Sackett's Harbor made a voyage thither by water a perilous one. The gallant master-commander, M. T. Woolsey, declared his willingness to attempt carrying the ordnance and naval stores to Stony Creek, 3 miles from Sackett's Harbor, where they might reach Commodore Chauncey in safety. On May 19 Woolsey was at Oswego with nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilla went out of the harbor at twilight, bearing Majth 130 riflemen. About the same number of Oneida Indians agreed to meet the flotilla at the mouth of Big Salmon River, and traverse the shore abreast the vessels, to assist in repelling any attack. Woolsey found it unsafe to attempt to reach Stony Creek, for the blockaders were vigilant, so he ran into Big Sandy Creek, a few miles from the harbor, under cover of a very dark night, and landed the precious treasure there. The British heard of the movement, and, ignorant of the presence of
e gallant master-commander, M. T. Woolsey, declared his willingness to attempt carrying the ordnance and naval stores to Stony Creek, 3 miles from Sackett's Harbor, where they might reach Commodore Chauncey in safety. On May 19 Woolsey was at Oswego with nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilla went out of the harbor at twilight, bearing Major Appling, with 130 riflemen. About the same number of Oneida Indians agreed to meet the flotilla at the mouth of Big Salmon River, and traverse the shore abreast the vessels, to assist in repelling any attack. Woolsey found it unsafe to attempt to reach Stony Creek, for the blockaders were vigilant, so he ran into Big Sandy Creek, a few miles from the harbor, under cover of a very dark night, and landed the precious treasure there. The British heard of the movement, and, ignorant of the presence of Major Appling and the Indians, proceeded to attempt to capture the flotilla on the Big Sandy. That stream woun
kett's Harbor, hastened for sea, lest Sir James L. Yeo would roam over Lake Ontario the unrestricted lord of the waters. Heavy guns and cables destined for her were yet at Oswego. The roads were almost impassable, and the blockade of Sackett's Harbor made a voyage thither by water a perilous one. The gallant master-commander, M. T. Woolsey, declared his willingness to attempt carrying the ordnance and naval stores to Stony Creek, 3 miles from Sackett's Harbor, where they might reach Commodore Chauncey in safety. On May 19 Woolsey was at Oswego with nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilla went out of the harbor at twilight, bearing Major Appling, with 130 riflemen. About the same number of Oneida Indians agreed to meet the flotilla at the mouth of Big Salmon River, and traverse the shore abreast the vessels, to assist in repelling any attack. Woolsey found it unsafe to attempt to reach Stony Creek, for the blockaders were vigilant, so he ran into B
Melancthon Taylor Woolsey (search for this): entry sandy-creek-battle-of
Sandy Creek, battle of. There was great anxiety felt in the spring of 1814, to have the Superior, ship-of-war, built at Sackett's Harbor, hastened for sea, lest Sir James L. Yeo would roam over Lake Ontario the unrestricted lord of the waters. Heavy guns and cables destined for her were yet at Oswego. The roads were almost impassable, and the blockade of Sackett's Harbor made a voyage thither by water a perilous one. The gallant master-commander, M. T. Woolsey, declared his willingness to attempt carrying the ordnance and naval stores to Stony Creek, 3 miles from Sackett's Harbor, where they might reach Commodore Chauncey in safety. On May 19 Woolsey was at Oswego with nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilla went out of the harbor at twilight, bearing Major Appling, with 130 riflemen. About the same number of Oneida Indians agreed to meet the flotilla at the mouth of Big Salmon River, and traverse the shore abreast the vessels, to assist in r
Sandy Creek, battle of. There was great anxiety felt in the spring of 1814, to have the Superior, ship-of-war, built at Sackett's Harbor, hastened for sea, lest Sir James L. Yeo would roam over Lake Ontario the unrestricted lord of the waters. Heavy guns and cables destined for her were yet at Oswego. The roads were almost impassable, and the blockade of Sackett's Harbor made a voyage thither by water a perilous one. The gallant master-commander, M. T. Woolsey, declared his willingness to attempt carrying the ordnance and naval stores to Stony Creek, 3 miles from Sackett's Harbor, where they might reach Commodore Chauncey in safety. On May 19 Woolsey was at Oswego with nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilla went out of the harbor at twilight, bearing Major Appling, with 130 riflemen. About the same number of Oneida Indians agreed to meet the flotilla at the mouth of Big Salmon River, and traverse the shore abreast the vessels, to assist in re
nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilla went out of the harbor at twilight, bearing Major Appling, with 130 riflemen. About the same number of Oneida Indians agreed to meet the flotilla at the mouth of Big Salmon Rght, and landed the precious treasure there. The British heard of the movement, and, ignorant of the presence of Major Appling and the Indians, proceeded to attempt to capture the flotilla on the Big Sandy. That stream wound through a marshy plain about 2 miles, and at that time was fringed with trees and shrubs. Among these Major Appling ambushed his Place of battle at Sandy Creek. riflemen and the Indians. Near Woolsey's boats were stationed some cavalry, artillery, and infantry, whot upon the American flotilla and grape and canister among the bushes. These dispersed the cowardly Indians, but young Appling's sharp-shooters were undisturbed. When the invaders were within rifle-range the riflemen opened destructive volleys up
s to attempt carrying the ordnance and naval stores to Stony Creek, 3 miles from Sackett's Harbor, where they might reach Commodore Chauncey in safety. On May 19 Woolsey was at Oswego with nineteen boats heavily laden with cannon and naval stores. The flotilla went out of the harbor at twilight, bearing Major Appling, with 130 rier of Oneida Indians agreed to meet the flotilla at the mouth of Big Salmon River, and traverse the shore abreast the vessels, to assist in repelling any attack. Woolsey found it unsafe to attempt to reach Stony Creek, for the blockaders were vigilant, so he ran into Big Sandy Creek, a few miles from the harbor, under cover of a vles, and at that time was fringed with trees and shrubs. Among these Major Appling ambushed his Place of battle at Sandy Creek. riflemen and the Indians. Near Woolsey's boats were stationed some cavalry, artillery, and infantry, with field-pieces, which had been sent there from Sackett's Harbor. The confident Britons, sure of
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