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Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): entry tappan-arthur
Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
New Haven (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry tappan-arthur
Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
Portland (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry tappan-arthur
Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry tappan-arthur
Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
Tappan, Arthur 1786-1865 Philanthropist; born in Northampton, Mass., May 22, 1786; received a common school education; established himself in business in Portland, Me, and subsequently in Montreal, Canada, where he remained until the beginning of the War of 1812. He was the founder of Oberlin College, and erected Tappan Hall there; endowed Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati; established a professorship at Auburn Theological Seminary; was one of the founders of the American Tract Society; and with his brother established the New York Journal of commerce in 1828 and The Emancipator in 1833. He was the first president of the American Anti-slavery Society, to which he contributed $1,000 a month for several years, but withdrew in 1840 on account of the aggressive spirit manifested by many members towards the churches and the Union; and during his later years was connected with a mercantile agency which his brother Lewis established. He died in New Haven, Conn., July 23, 1865.
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