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United States (United States) (search for this): entry verrazzano-giovanni-da
e of Cape Breton is a trace of them), thence returning to France. He reached Dieppe early in July, and it is from Dieppe, July 8, 1524, that his letter to the King is dated. It is the earliest description known to exist of the shores of the United States. There are two copies of Verrazzano's letter, both of them, however, Italian translations, the original letter not being in existence. One was printed by Ramusio in 1556, and this was translated into English by Hakluyt for his Divers voyaablest objector to the genuineness of Verrazzano's letter and voyage. See his book on The voyage of Verrazzano, which affected Mr. Bancroft so deeply that he has left out all mention of Verrazzano in the revised edition of his History of the United States. The entire controversy is reviewed most ably by Justin Winsor, in the fourth volume of the new Narrative and critical history of America, and he shows the utter insufficiency of Murphy's objections. This review should be carefully read by
of the people wore copper ear-rings. Departing from thence, we kept along the coast, steering north-east, and found the country more pleasant and open, free from woods, and distant in the interior we saw lofty mountains, but none which extended to the shore. Within fifty leagues we discovered thirty-two islands, all near the main land, small and of pleasant appearance, but high and so disposed as to afford excellent harbours and channels, as we see in the Adriatic gulph, near Illyria and Dalmatia. We had no intercourse with the people, but we judge that they were similar in nature and usages to those we were last among. After sailing between east and north the distance of one hundred and fifty leagues more, and finding our provisions and naval stores nearly exhausted, we took in wood and water and determined to return to. France, having discovered 502—that is, 700 (sic) leagues of unknown lands. As to the religious faith of all these tribes, not understanding their language,
who maintained, contrary to mathematical reasoning, that it was less than the water, whereas actual experience proves the reverse, so that we judge in respect to extent of surface the land covers as much space as the water; and I hope more clearly and more satisfactorily to point out and explain to your Majesty the great extent of that new land, or new world, of which I have been speaking. The continent of Asia and Africa, we know for certain, is joined to Europe at the north in Norway and Russia, which disproves the idea of the ancients that all this part had been navigated from the Cimbric Chersonesus, eastward as far as the Caspian Sea. They also maintained that the whole continent was surrounded by two seas situate to the east and west of it, which seas in fact do not surround either of the two continents, for as we have seen above, the land of the southern hemisphere at the latitude of 54 extends eastwardly an unknown distance, and that of the northern passing the 66th parallel
Block Island (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry verrazzano-giovanni-da
orthward, remembering that he was the first European who explored this part of the coast. A newe land, he exclaims in his letter, never before seen of any man, either auncient or moderne. Among the places which he describes, New York Harbor, Block Island (which he named Louisa, in honor of the King's mother), Newport, and other places have been identified. He continued along the Maine coast and as far as Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, which fishermen from Brittany had found twenty years beforeparagraph of this translation with sufficient clearness to admit of their being easily recognized. The island of a triangular form, resembling the island of Rhodes, which Verrazzano mentions as 50 leagues to the east of New York, is doubtless Block Island.—ed. Having supplied ourselves with every thing necessary, on the fifth of May we departed from the port, and sailed one hundred and fifty leagues, keeping so close to the coast as never to lose it from our sight; the nature of the country
Cathay (North Dakota, United States) (search for this): entry verrazzano-giovanni-da
ly in this occupation that he gained the notice and favor of Francis I. Late in 1523 he started on his voyage across the Atlantic, in the Dauphine, his object being, as he tells us himself in the cosmographical appendix to his letter, to reach Cathay (China) by a westward route. Of this voyage the famous letter here published is the record. It was in March, 1524, that he discovered the American coast, probably not far from the site of Wilmington, in North Carolina. It will be interesting fations, as also the ebb and flow of the sea in all places, were noted in a little book, which may prove serviceable to navigators; they are communicated to your Majesty in the hope of promoting science. My intention in this voyage was to reach Cathay, on the extreme coast of Asia, expecting, however, to find in the newly discovered land some such an obstacle, as they have proved to be, yet I did not doubt that I should penetrate by some passage to the eastern ocean. It was the opinion of the
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry verrazzano-giovanni-da
rge, might ride safely, without fear of tempests or other dangers. Turning towards the south, at the entrance to the harbour, on both sides, there are very pleasant hills, and many streams of clear water, which flow down to the sea. In the midst of the entrance, there is a rock of free-stone, formed by nature, and suitable for the construction of any kind of machine or bulwark for the defence of the harbour. The above description applies to Narraganset Bay and the harbor of Newport In Rhode Island, although mistaken by Dr. Miller, in his discourse before this society, as published In the first volume of the former series of Collections, for the bay and harbor of New York. The latter are briefly described in a preceding paragraph of this translation with sufficient clearness to admit of their being easily recognized. The island of a triangular form, resembling the island of Rhodes, which Verrazzano mentions as 50 leagues to the east of New York, is doubtless Block Island.—ed. H
rth Carolina. It will be interesting for the student to follow him in his course northward, remembering that he was the first European who explored this part of the coast. A newe land, he exclaims in his letter, never before seen of any man, either auncient or moderne. Among the places which he describes, New York Harbor, Block Island (which he named Louisa, in honor of the King's mother), Newport, and other places have been identified. He continued along the Maine coast and as far as Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, which fishermen from Brittany had found twenty years before (the name of Cape Breton is a trace of them), thence returning to France. He reached Dieppe early in July, and it is from Dieppe, July 8, 1524, that his letter to the King is dated. It is the earliest description known to exist of the shores of the United States. There are two copies of Verrazzano's letter, both of them, however, Italian translations, the original letter not being in existence. One was pri
s been stated, but on doubtful authority, that he commanded one of the ships in Aubert's expedition to America in 1508. In 1521 he appears in history as a French corsair, preying upon the commerce between Spain and America; and it was probably in this occupation that he gained the notice and favor of Francis I. Late in 1523 he started on his voyage across the Atlantic, in the Dauphine, his object being, as he tells us himself in the cosmographical appendix to his letter, to reach Cathay (China) by a westward route. Of this voyage the famous letter here published is the record. It was in March, 1524, that he discovered the American coast, probably not far from the site of Wilmington, in North Carolina. It will be interesting for the student to follow him in his course northward, remembering that he was the first European who explored this part of the coast. A newe land, he exclaims in his letter, never before seen of any man, either auncient or moderne. Among the places which
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): entry verrazzano-giovanni-da
collection of voyages by Ramusio in 1556, sailed from France late Giovanni da Verrazzano. in 1523 in the ship Dauphine, under a commission from the King, and touched America first, at the mouth of the Cape Fear River, in March, 1524. In that letter he gives an account of his explorations of the North American coast from lat. 34° to 50°, at the Gulf of St. Lawrence. He describes the people at various points, and his topographical descriptions seem to indicate that he entered the bays of Delaware, New York, and Narraganset, and the harbor of Boston. In the Strozzi library at Florence is preserved a cosmographic description of the coasts and all the countries which he visited, from which it is evident he was in search of a northwest passage to India. The region of America which he visited he called New-France. The authenticity of his letter to Francis I. has been questioned by American writers, who suppose that it was forged by one of his countrymen anxious to secure for Italy th
Champlain, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry verrazzano-giovanni-da
nformation, to which the more careful student should constantly go in connection with almost all of the lectures on America and France. There is a chapter devoted to Jacques Cartier, the next important Frenchman in America, and very much about Champlain. Verrazzano, Cartier, and Champlain are also all most interestingly treated by Parkman, in his Pioneers of France in the New world. Champlain's own writings, which have been carefully edited by Rev. Edmund F. Slafter, should be consulted. Champlain's own writings, which have been carefully edited by Rev. Edmund F. Slafter, should be consulted. Captain John De Verrazzano to his most Serene Majesty, the King of France, writes: Since the tempests which we encountered on the northern coasts, I have not written to your most Serene and Christian Majesty concerning the four ships sent out by your orders on the ocean to discover new lands, because I thought you must have been before apprized of all that had happened to us—that we had been compelled by the impetuous violence of the winds to put into Britany in distress with only the two sh
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