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Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
-general. He engaged in the battles of Manassas (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general he was exceedingly active and efficient, from the battle of the Wilderness to the battle of Five Forks. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was the author of Explorations in the Dakota country; Preliminary report of explorations in Nebraska and Dakota in the years 1855–;57; and An account of the 5th army Corps at the battle of five Forks. He died in Newport, R. I., Aug. 8, 1882. A memorial statue of him was erected on Little Round Top, Gettysburg, in 188
Nebraska (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
s (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exceedingly active and efficient, from the battle of the Wilderness to the battle of Five Forks. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was the author of Explorations in the Dakota country; Preliminary report of explorations in Nebraska and Dakota in the years 1855–;57; and An account of the 5th army Corps at the battle of five Forks. He died in Newport, R. I., Aug. 8, 1882. A memorial statue of him was erected on Little Round Top, Gettysburg, in 188
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
1882 Military officer; born in Cold Spring, N. Y., Jan. 8, 1830; graduated at West Point in 1850, entering the topographical engineers, and was assistant Professor of Mathematics at the Military Academy from 1859 to 1861. He was made colonel of the 5th Gouverneur Kemble Warren. New York Volunteers, August, 1861, and commanded a brigade in the campaign of 1862. In September he was promoted brigadier-general. He engaged in the battles of Manassas (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exceedingly active and efficient, fro
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
nd was assistant Professor of Mathematics at the Military Academy from 1859 to 1861. He was made colonel of the 5th Gouverneur Kemble Warren. New York Volunteers, August, 1861, and commanded a brigade in the campaign of 1862. In September he was promoted brigadier-general. He engaged in the battles of Manassas (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exceedingly active and efficient, from the battle of the Wilderness to the battle of Five Forks. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was the
Cold Spring, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
Warren, Gouverneur Kemble 1830-1882 Military officer; born in Cold Spring, N. Y., Jan. 8, 1830; graduated at West Point in 1850, entering the topographical engineers, and was assistant Professor of Mathematics at the Military Academy from 1859 to 1861. He was made colonel of the 5th Gouverneur Kemble Warren. New York Volunteers, August, 1861, and commanded a brigade in the campaign of 1862. In September he was promoted brigadier-general. He engaged in the battles of Manassas (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exce
Five Forks (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
s (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exceedingly active and efficient, from the battle of the Wilderness to the battle of Five Forks. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was the author of Explorations in the Dakota country; Preliminary report of explorations in Nebraska and Dakota in the years 1855–;57; and An account of the 5th army Corps at the battle of five Forks. He died in Newport, R. I., Aug. 8, 1882. A memorial statue of him was erected on Little Round Top, Gettysburg, in 188
Auburn, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
59 to 1861. He was made colonel of the 5th Gouverneur Kemble Warren. New York Volunteers, August, 1861, and commanded a brigade in the campaign of 1862. In September he was promoted brigadier-general. He engaged in the battles of Manassas (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exceedingly active and efficient, from the battle of the Wilderness to the battle of Five Forks. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was the author of Explorations in the Dakota country; Preliminary report of expl
West Point (New York, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
Warren, Gouverneur Kemble 1830-1882 Military officer; born in Cold Spring, N. Y., Jan. 8, 1830; graduated at West Point in 1850, entering the topographical engineers, and was assistant Professor of Mathematics at the Military Academy from 1859 to 1861. He was made colonel of the 5th Gouverneur Kemble Warren. New York Volunteers, August, 1861, and commanded a brigade in the campaign of 1862. In September he was promoted brigadier-general. He engaged in the battles of Manassas (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exce
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
s (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exceedingly active and efficient, from the battle of the Wilderness to the battle of Five Forks. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was the author of Explorations in the Dakota country; Preliminary report of explorations in Nebraska and Dakota in the years 1855–;57; and An account of the 5th army Corps at the battle of five Forks. He died in Newport, R. I., Aug. 8, 1882. A memorial statue of him was erected on Little Round Top, Gettysburg, in 188
South Dakota (South Dakota, United States) (search for this): entry warren-gouverneur-kemble
s (or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exceedingly active and efficient, from the battle of the Wilderness to the battle of Five Forks. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was the author of Explorations in the Dakota country; Preliminary report of explorations in Nebraska and Dakota in the years 1855–;57; and An account of the 5th army Corps at the battle of five Forks. He died in Newport, R. I., Aug. 8, 1882. A memorial statue of him was erected on Little Round Top, Gettysburg, in 188
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