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Holland (Netherlands) (search for this): entry washington-george
n the hands of the executive. Gentlemen of the House of Representatives,—The commissioners, charged with the settlement of accounts between the United and individual States, concluded their important functions within the time limited by law; and the balances, struck in their report, which will be laid before Congress, have been placed on the books of the treasury. On the first day of June last, an instalment of one million of florins became payable on the loans of the United States in Holland. This was adjusted by a prolongation of the period of reimbursement, in the nature of a new loan, at interest at five per cent. for the term of ten years; and the expenses of this operation were a commission of three per cent. The first instalment of the loan of two millions of dollars from the bank of the United States has been paid, as was directed by law. For the second, it is necessary that provision should be made. No pecuniary consideration is more urgent than the regular redem
Hamilton, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry washington-george
aluing the grapes he could not reach. You will perceive, my dear sir, by what is here observed (and which you will be pleased to consider in the light of a confidential communication), that my inclinations will dispose and decide me to remain as I am, unless a clear and insurmountable conviction should be impressed on my mind that some very disagreeable consequences must, in all human probability, result from the indulgence of my wishes. Oct. 3, 1788. To Alexander Hamilton. See Hamilton's letter upon the importance of Washington serving as first President of the United States under the Constitution, in Ford's edition of Washington, XI. 329. On your acceptance of the office of President, Hamilton wrote, the success of the new government in its commencement may materially depend. Although I could not help observing, from several publications and letters, that my name had been sometimes spoken of, and that it was possible the Contingency which is the subject of your letter
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry washington-george
hty God to have you always in his holy keeping. To the Bishops, clergy, and laity of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the States of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina, in General convention assembled. Aug. 19, 1789. I sincerely thank you for your affectionate congratulare happiness, and I beseech the Almighty to take you and yours under his special care. To the religious Society called Quakers, at their yearly meeting for Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and the Western part of Maryland and Virginia. October, 1789. I receive with pleasure your affectionate address, and thank you forrquis de Chastellux. The Constitution which was proposed by the federal convention has been adopted by the States of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Georgia. No State has rejected it. The convention of Maryland is now sitting, and will probably adopt it; as that of South Carolina is expected
fate of nations depends, to crown with success our mutual endeavours for the general happiness. As soon as the war in Europe had embraced those powers, with whom the United States have the most extensive relations, there was reason to apprehend, es of the military art, which can scarcely ever be attained by practice alone. The connexion of the United States with Europe has become extremely interesting. The occurrences, which relate to it, and have passed under the knowledge of the executr relaxing the powers of the Union, annihilating the cement of the confederation, and exposing us to become the sport of European politics, which may play one State against another, to prevent their growing importance, and to serve their own intereste navigated at so much less expense, that we may hope to rival and supply (at least through the West Indies) some part of Europe with commodities from thence. This year the exports from Massachusetts have amounted to a great deal more than their imp
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry washington-george
n, awaits our choice, and are the only alternatives before us. Thus believing, I had not, nor have I now, any hesitation in deciding on which to lean. April 25, 1788. To the Marquis de Chastellux. The Constitution which was proposed by the federal convention has been adopted by the States of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Georgia. No State has rejected it. The convention of Maryland is now sitting, and will probably adopt it; as that of South Carolina is expected to do in May. The other conventions will assemble early in the summer. Hitherto there has been much greater unanimity in favour of the proposed government than could have reasonably been expected. Should it be adopted (and I think it will be), America will left up her head again, and in a few years become respectable among the nations. It is a flattering and consolatory reflection that our rising republics have the good wishes of all the philosophers, patriots, and virtuo
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry washington-george
orthy of your favourable opinion, as well as such as shall, in every respect, best comport with the character of an intelligent and accountable being. To the Congregational Church and Society at Medway, formerly St. John's parish, in the State of Georgia. May, 1791. I learn, with gratitude proportioned to the occasion, your attachment to my person, and the pleasure you express on my election to the Presidency of the United States. Your sentiments on the happy influence of our equal goiding on which to lean. April 25, 1788. To the Marquis de Chastellux. The Constitution which was proposed by the federal convention has been adopted by the States of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Georgia. No State has rejected it. The convention of Maryland is now sitting, and will probably adopt it; as that of South Carolina is expected to do in May. The other conventions will assemble early in the summer. Hitherto there has been much greate
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry washington-george
. W. Ball, to whom his father was married in March, 1730. George was their first-born of six children. With these she was left a widow when her eldest child was little more than ten years of age. In the latter years of her life she lived in Fredericksburg, in a modest house, on the northwest Washington surveying land in Virginia. Residence of the Washington family. soon after Washington's birth, the family moved to an estate in Stafford county. The plain farm-house in which they livedrlooked the Rappahannock River. There Washington's father died, when the former was about ten years of age, leaving a plantation to each of his sons. corner of Charles and Lewis streets. There she died, and was buried a short distance from Fredericksburg, near a ledge of rocks, to which she often resorted for meditation, and which she had selected as Combined arms of the Washington family. her burial-place years before her death. Over the grave stands an unfinished monument of white marble
Ford, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry washington-george
selections from his large correspondence upon this important subject while it was pending will indicate the character of that influence and of Washington's sentiments concerning the new national government. The student is referred to vol. XI. of Ford's edition of the writings of Washington for the complete collection of his letters during this period. He will also find in that volume Washington's diary during the constitutional convention, which, although but a skeleton, will give him an insi in all human probability, result from the indulgence of my wishes. Oct. 3, 1788. To Alexander Hamilton. See Hamilton's letter upon the importance of Washington serving as first President of the United States under the Constitution, in Ford's edition of Washington, XI. 329. On your acceptance of the office of President, Hamilton wrote, the success of the new government in its commencement may materially depend. Although I could not help observing, from several publications and let
Barbados (Barbados) (search for this): entry washington-george
was appointed public surveyor at the age of eighteen. In pursuit of his profession, he learned much of wood-craft and the topography of the country; also of the habits of the Indians in the camp and on the war-path. These were useful lessons, of great value to him in after-life. At the age of nineteen young Washington was appointed an adjutant-general of the militia of a district, with the rank of major, but soon afterwards resigned to accompany his invalid half-brother, Lawrence, to Barbadoes, where George had the small-pox. His brother soon afterwards died, and by his will George became heir to the fine estate of Mount Vernon. In 1753 he was sent on a delicate mission, by the governor of Virginia, to the commander of the French forces making encroachments on the English domain, and performed the duties with great credit, for which he was thanked by the Virginia legislature. So highly were his character and services valued, that when, in 1755, Plan showing foundation of
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry washington-george
me, it will be a desirable thing, for the protection of the Union, to cooperate, as far as the circumstances may conveniently admit, with the disinterested endeavours of your society to civilize and christianize the savages of the wilderness. Under these impressions, I pray Almighty God to have you always in his holy keeping. To the Bishops, clergy, and laity of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the States of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina, in General convention assembled. Aug. 19, 1789. I sincerely thank you for your affectionate congratulations on my election to the chief magistracy of the United States. After having received from my fellowcitizens in general the most liberal treatment, after having found them disposed to contemplate, in the most flattering point of view, the performance of my military services, and the manner of my retirement at the close of the war, I feel that I have a right to console myself
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