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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 53 total hits in 35 results.

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oth State and national politics, and became known as the most adroit of party managers. He was an original leader of the Whig party, active in the election of Governor Seward in 1838 and 1840, in President Harrison's nomination in 1836 and election of 1840, in President Taylor's and General Scott's nominations in 1848 and 1852 respectively. He advocated the nomination of Seward for the Presidency in 1856 and 1860, and cordially supported Fremont and Lincoln. In 1861 he went to Europe with Archbishop Hughes and Bishop McIlvaine, under a commission from the national government, to endeavor to prevent foreign recognition of the Confederacy. On his return he settled in New York City, where he edited the Commercial Advertiser till ill-health caused his retirement in 1867. He published Letters from Europe and the West Indies, and Reminiscences in the Atlantic monthly in 1870. He died in New York City, Nov. 22, 1882. His Autobiography was published in Boston in 1833. Thurlow Weed.
nd election of 1840, in President Taylor's and General Scott's nominations in 1848 and 1852 respectively. He advocated the nomination of Seward for the Presidency in 1856 and 1860, and cordially supported Fremont and Lincoln. In 1861 he went to Europe with Archbishop Hughes and Bishop McIlvaine, under a commission from the national government, to endeavor to prevent foreign recognition of the Confederacy. On his return he settled in New York City, where he edited the Commercial Advertiser tilchbishop Hughes and Bishop McIlvaine, under a commission from the national government, to endeavor to prevent foreign recognition of the Confederacy. On his return he settled in New York City, where he edited the Commercial Advertiser till ill-health caused his retirement in 1867. He published Letters from Europe and the West Indies, and Reminiscences in the Atlantic monthly in 1870. He died in New York City, Nov. 22, 1882. His Autobiography was published in Boston in 1833. Thurlow Weed.
Rochester (New York, United States) (search for this): entry weed-thurlow
n orphan in early childhood, with a very scant school education; learned the printer's trade. When fifteen years of age he entered the army as a volunteer, serving throughout the War of 1812 as quartermaster-sergeant; at the age of twenty-one began the publication of a newspaper, the Agriculturist, at Norwich, N. Y. Two years later he founded the Onondaga county Republican. He was unsuccessful, and worked as a journeyman printer until 1825, when he was engaged to edit a daily paper at Rochester, N. Y., an anti-masonic paper, and was twice elected to the legislature. In 1830 he became editor of the Albany Evening journal, in opposition to the Albany regency, the nullification policy of Calhoun, and also to the policy of President Jackson, and conducted it with great ability more than thirty years. Throughout this period he was influential in both State and national politics, and became known as the most adroit of party managers. He was an original leader of the Whig party, active in
Onondaga (New York, United States) (search for this): entry weed-thurlow
Weed, Thurlow 1797-1882 Journalist; born in Cairo, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1797; became an orphan in early childhood, with a very scant school education; learned the printer's trade. When fifteen years of age he entered the army as a volunteer, serving throughout the War of 1812 as quartermaster-sergeant; at the age of twenty-one began the publication of a newspaper, the Agriculturist, at Norwich, N. Y. Two years later he founded the Onondaga county Republican. He was unsuccessful, and worked as a journeyman printer until 1825, when he was engaged to edit a daily paper at Rochester, N. Y., an anti-masonic paper, and was twice elected to the legislature. In 1830 he became editor of the Albany Evening journal, in opposition to the Albany regency, the nullification policy of Calhoun, and also to the policy of President Jackson, and conducted it with great ability more than thirty years. Throughout this period he was influential in both State and national politics, and became known as the
Norwich, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry weed-thurlow
Weed, Thurlow 1797-1882 Journalist; born in Cairo, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1797; became an orphan in early childhood, with a very scant school education; learned the printer's trade. When fifteen years of age he entered the army as a volunteer, serving throughout the War of 1812 as quartermaster-sergeant; at the age of twenty-one began the publication of a newspaper, the Agriculturist, at Norwich, N. Y. Two years later he founded the Onondaga county Republican. He was unsuccessful, and worked as a journeyman printer until 1825, when he was engaged to edit a daily paper at Rochester, N. Y., an anti-masonic paper, and was twice elected to the legislature. In 1830 he became editor of the Albany Evening journal, in opposition to the Albany regency, the nullification policy of Calhoun, and also to the policy of President Jackson, and conducted it with great ability more than thirty years. Throughout this period he was influential in both State and national politics, and became known as the
Cairo, Greene county (New York, United States) (search for this): entry weed-thurlow
Weed, Thurlow 1797-1882 Journalist; born in Cairo, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1797; became an orphan in early childhood, with a very scant school education; learned the printer's trade. When fifteen years of age he entered the army as a volunteer, serving throughout the War of 1812 as quartermaster-sergeant; at the age of twenty-one began the publication of a newspaper, the Agriculturist, at Norwich, N. Y. Two years later he founded the Onondaga county Republican. He was unsuccessful, and worked as a journeyman printer until 1825, when he was engaged to edit a daily paper at Rochester, N. Y., an anti-masonic paper, and was twice elected to the legislature. In 1830 he became editor of the Albany Evening journal, in opposition to the Albany regency, the nullification policy of Calhoun, and also to the policy of President Jackson, and conducted it with great ability more than thirty years. Throughout this period he was influential in both State and national politics, and became known as the
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): entry weed-thurlow
hout this period he was influential in both State and national politics, and became known as the most adroit of party managers. He was an original leader of the Whig party, active in the election of Governor Seward in 1838 and 1840, in President Harrison's nomination in 1836 and election of 1840, in President Taylor's and General Scott's nominations in 1848 and 1852 respectively. He advocated the nomination of Seward for the Presidency in 1856 and 1860, and cordially supported Fremont and Lincoln. In 1861 he went to Europe with Archbishop Hughes and Bishop McIlvaine, under a commission from the national government, to endeavor to prevent foreign recognition of the Confederacy. On his return he settled in New York City, where he edited the Commercial Advertiser till ill-health caused his retirement in 1867. He published Letters from Europe and the West Indies, and Reminiscences in the Atlantic monthly in 1870. He died in New York City, Nov. 22, 1882. His Autobiography was publis
John C. Fremont (search for this): entry weed-thurlow
ears. Throughout this period he was influential in both State and national politics, and became known as the most adroit of party managers. He was an original leader of the Whig party, active in the election of Governor Seward in 1838 and 1840, in President Harrison's nomination in 1836 and election of 1840, in President Taylor's and General Scott's nominations in 1848 and 1852 respectively. He advocated the nomination of Seward for the Presidency in 1856 and 1860, and cordially supported Fremont and Lincoln. In 1861 he went to Europe with Archbishop Hughes and Bishop McIlvaine, under a commission from the national government, to endeavor to prevent foreign recognition of the Confederacy. On his return he settled in New York City, where he edited the Commercial Advertiser till ill-health caused his retirement in 1867. He published Letters from Europe and the West Indies, and Reminiscences in the Atlantic monthly in 1870. He died in New York City, Nov. 22, 1882. His Autobiograph
Benjamin Harrison (search for this): entry weed-thurlow
egislature. In 1830 he became editor of the Albany Evening journal, in opposition to the Albany regency, the nullification policy of Calhoun, and also to the policy of President Jackson, and conducted it with great ability more than thirty years. Throughout this period he was influential in both State and national politics, and became known as the most adroit of party managers. He was an original leader of the Whig party, active in the election of Governor Seward in 1838 and 1840, in President Harrison's nomination in 1836 and election of 1840, in President Taylor's and General Scott's nominations in 1848 and 1852 respectively. He advocated the nomination of Seward for the Presidency in 1856 and 1860, and cordially supported Fremont and Lincoln. In 1861 he went to Europe with Archbishop Hughes and Bishop McIlvaine, under a commission from the national government, to endeavor to prevent foreign recognition of the Confederacy. On his return he settled in New York City, where he edit
Francis W. Hughes (search for this): entry weed-thurlow
oth State and national politics, and became known as the most adroit of party managers. He was an original leader of the Whig party, active in the election of Governor Seward in 1838 and 1840, in President Harrison's nomination in 1836 and election of 1840, in President Taylor's and General Scott's nominations in 1848 and 1852 respectively. He advocated the nomination of Seward for the Presidency in 1856 and 1860, and cordially supported Fremont and Lincoln. In 1861 he went to Europe with Archbishop Hughes and Bishop McIlvaine, under a commission from the national government, to endeavor to prevent foreign recognition of the Confederacy. On his return he settled in New York City, where he edited the Commercial Advertiser till ill-health caused his retirement in 1867. He published Letters from Europe and the West Indies, and Reminiscences in the Atlantic monthly in 1870. He died in New York City, Nov. 22, 1882. His Autobiography was published in Boston in 1833. Thurlow Weed.
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