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Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry wise-henry-alexander
Wise, Henry Alexander 1806-1876 Diplomatist; born in Drummondtown, Va., Dec. 3, 1806; was admitted to the bar at Winchester, Va., in 1828; settled in Nashville, Tenn., but soon returned to Accomack, where he was elected to Congress in 1833, and remained a member until 1843, when he was appointed minister to Brazil. He was a zealous advocate of the annexation of Texas. He was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1850, and was governor of Virginia from 1856 to 1860. He approved the pro-slavery constitution (Lecompton) of Kansas, and in 1859 published a treatise on territorial government, containing the doctrine of Henry Alexander wise. the right of Congress to protect slavery. The last important act of his administration was ordering the execution of John Brown (q. v.), for the raid on Harper's Ferry. In the Virginia convention, early in 1861, he advocated a peaceful settlement of difficulties with the national government; but after the ordinance of secession h
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry wise-henry-alexander
his administration was ordering the execution of John Brown (q. v.), for the raid on Harper's Ferry. In the Virginia convention, early in 1861, he advocated a peaceful settlement of difficulties with the national government; but after the ordinance of secession had been passed he took up arms against the government, became a Confederate brigadier-general, was an unsuccessful leader in western Virginia, and commanded at Roanoke Island, but was sick at the time of its capture. He died in Richmond, Va., Sept. 12, 1876. Among his publications is Seven decades of the Union: memoir of John Tyler. Speech against know-nothingism. During the know-nothing agitation (q. v.), before the party was organized, Mr. Wise delivered the following speech in Congress, Sept. 18, 1852: The laws of the United States-federal and State laws—declare and defend the liberties of our people. They are free in every sense—free in the sense of Magna Charta and beyond Magna Charta; free by the surpass
B may concur with the community on the subject of this proscription alone, and upon no other subject; and yet the Know-nothings might elect B by their secret sentiment against the public sentiment. Thus it attacks not only American doctrines of expatriation, allegiance, and protection, but the equality of citizenship, and the authority of public sentiment. In the affair of Koszta, how did our blood rush to his rescue? Did the Know-nothing side with him and Mr. Marcy, or with Hulseman and Austria? If with Koszta, why? Let them ask themselves for the rationale, and see if it can in reason abide with their orders. There is no middle ground in respect to naturalization. We must either have naturalization laws and let foreigners become citizens, on equal terms of capacities and privileges, or we must exclude them altogether. If we abolish naturalization laws, we return to the European dogma: Once a citizen, always a citizen. If we let foreigners be naturalized and don't extend to
ble, the rule of public, political right. Indeed, is this not the very essence of the higher law doctrine? It cannot be said to be legitimate public sentiment and the action of its authority. Public sentiment, proper, is a concurrence of the common mind in some conclusion, conviction, opinion, taste, or action in respect to persons or things subject to its public notice. It will and it must control the minds and actions of men, by public and conventional opinion. Count Mole said that in France it was stronger than statutes. It is so here. That it is which should decide at the polls of a republic. But here is a secret sentiment, which may be so organized as to contradict the public sentiment. Candidate A may be a native and a Protestant. and may concur with the community, if it be a Know-nothing community, on every other subject except that of proscribing Catholics and naturalized citizens; and candidate B may concur with the community on the subject of this proscription alone
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry wise-henry-alexander
as a zealous advocate of the annexation of Texas. He was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1850, and was governor of Virginia from 1856 to 1860. He approved the pro-slavery constitution (Lecompton) of Kansas, and in 1859 published a treatise on territorial government, containing the doctrine of Henry Alexander wise. the right of Congress to protect slavery. The last important act of his administration was ordering the execution of John Brown (q. v.), for the raid on Harper's Ferry. In the Virginia convention, early in 1861, he advocated a peaceful settlement of difficulties with the national government; but after the ordinance of secession had been passed he took up arms against the government, became a Confederate brigadier-general, was an unsuccessful leader in western Virginia, and commanded at Roanoke Island, but was sick at the time of its capture. He died in Richmond, Va., Sept. 12, 1876. Among his publications is Seven decades of the Union: memoir of Joh
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry wise-henry-alexander
ted prejudices throughout Europe. The effect of the concussion was general, but the shock was greatest in this country (England). It toppled down the full grown intolerable abuses of centuries at a blow; heaved the ground from under the feet of bign angry sea, and has never yet subsided. Germany first broke the spell of misbegotten fear, and gave the watchword; but England joined the shout, and echoed it back, with her island voice, from her thousand cliffs and craggy shores, in a longer and louder strain. With that cry the genius of Great Britain rose and threw down the gauntlet to the nations. There was a mighty fermentation: the waters were out; public opinion was in a state of projection; liberty was held out to all to think and nd conditions, to own and read. with its wonderful table of contents, from Genesis to the Revelation. Every village in England would present the scene so well described in Burns's Cotter's Saturday night. How unlike this agitation, this shock, th
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry wise-henry-alexander
Wise, Henry Alexander 1806-1876 Diplomatist; born in Drummondtown, Va., Dec. 3, 1806; was admitted to the bar at Winchester, Va., in 1828; settled in Nashville, Tenn., but soon returned to Accomack, where he was elected to Congress in 1833, and remained a member until 1843, when he was appointed minister to Brazil. He was a zealous advocate of the annexation of Texas. He was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1850, and was governor of Virginia from 1856 to 1860. He approved the pro-slavery constitution (Lecompton) of Kansas, and in 1859 published a treatise on territorial government, containing the doctrine of Henry Alexander wise. the right of Congress to protect slavery. The last important act of his administration was ordering the execution of John Brown (q. v.), for the raid on Harper's Ferry. In the Virginia convention, early in 1861, he advocated a peaceful settlement of difficulties with the national government; but after the ordinance of secession ha
United States (United States) (search for this): entry wise-henry-alexander
ress, Sept. 18, 1852: The laws of the United States-federal and State laws—declare and defend haracter. He remained continuously in the United States the full period of five years. When he had consummately a naturalized citizen of the United States, he then, and not until then, returned to ry hour. He applies for protection to the United States. Would the Knownothings interpose in his nd to swear allegiance and fidelity to the United States. The King of Prussia now claims no legal t he hinders the man from returning to the United States, and from discharging the allegiance and fidelity we required him to swear to the United States. The King of Prussia says he should do him s, and his laws were first binding him. The United States say—true, he was born under your laws, butnce, which we required him to swear to the United States; he has sworn fidelity to us, and we have,on to any office or public trust under the United States. The State of Virginia has, from her earl
he United States, he then, and not until then, returned to Prussia to visit an aged father. He was immediately, on his retur seized and forced into the Landwehr, or militia system of Prussia, under the maxim: Once a citizen, always a citizen! There he is forced to do service to the King of Prussia at this very hour. He applies for protection to the United States. Wouldunce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to the King of Prussia, and to swear allegiance and fidelity to the United States. The King of Prussia now claims no legal forfeiture from him—he punishes him for no crime—he claims of him no legal debt—hee required him to swear to the United States. The King of Prussia says he should do him service for seven years, for this wawhich will the Know-nothings take sides? With the King of Prussia against our naturalized citizen and against America, or wieign influence—against American institutions. The King of Prussia is a pretty potent foreign influence—he was one of the
en? Then they will aid a foreign influence against our laws! Will they take sides with our naturalized citizen? If so, then upon what grounds? Now, they must have a good cause of interposition to justify us against all the received dogmas of European despotism. Don't they see, can't they perceive, that they have no other grounds than those I have urged? He is our citizen, nationalized, owing us allegiance and we owing him protection. And if we owe him protection abroad, because of his sn, fair, and free —if anything was ever blatant even—it was the Reformation. To quote from a mighty British pen: It gave a mighty impulse and increased activity to thought and inquiry, agitated the inert mass of accumulated prejudices throughout Europe. The effect of the concussion was general, but the shock was greatest in this country (England). It toppled down the full grown intolerable abuses of centuries at a blow; heaved the ground from under the feet of bigoted faith and slavish obedien
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