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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 158 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 144 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 139 19 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 134 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 129 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 120 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 112 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 110 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 109 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) or search for Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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orous, decisive action is upon us, and we must do our duty. Upon the surface, affairs appear to be quiet, and I can give you no satisfaction as to their real condition. It is true that threats of an attack on Pensacola have been made, but it is uncertain whether any attack will be made. As you know, an attack was made on Sewell's Point, near Norfolk, but the vessel making it was repulsed and disabled. But the general opinion and indications are that the first demonstration will be at Harper's Ferry, and that there, where John Brown inaugurated his work of slaughter, will be fought a fierce and bloody battle. As for myself, I believe that there the war will begin; and that the first boom of cannon that breaks upon our ears will come from that point. But let it begin where it will, and be as bloody and prolonged as it may, we are prepared for the issue! Some think there will be no war; as to that I know not. But whatever others wanted, the object of the Confederate Government is
of junction of the Manasses Gap, with the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, to cut off all communication between Richmond and the Northern portion of the State. This movement, if successful, completely breaks the lines of the rebels, isolates Harper's Ferry from the base of their operations, and involves either the dispersion or capture of the forces at that point. We also learn that a body of Ohio troops is moving from Wheeling by way of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad upon the same point. Wele for offensive operations. The number is daily and rapidly augmented by the constant arrival of regiments from every portion of the Northern States. This is a very formidable force, much larger we believe than can be opposed to it, should Harper's Ferry and Norfolk be attacked or threatened by competent forces at the same time. We possess great advantages, not only in the superiority of numbers, but in our means of concentration against any menaced points. In a very few days our active for
ople were yet ignorant of its existence, the executive officers of Virginia rushed, incontinently, into open war against the United States. They endeavored to obstruct the harbor of Norfolk, in order to secure the plunder of the Navy Yard at Gosport, and sent a military power to complete the work of its spoliation. The enterprise failed indeed to clutch the spoil, but it caused the destruction of millions of dollars' worth of public property. The same thing was, substantially, done at Harper's Ferry. Virginia troops were marched upon the place to seize the arsenal. They did not get possession, as John Brown did, only because the vigilant little garrison, knowing its inability to resist such superior numbers, destroyed the property and made good its retreat. They menaced this capital by open threats of military force, by obstructing the roads leading to it, and by active endeavors to command the navigation of the Potomac. And all this was done while the State, according to the le
mad and wicked fanatics as the settled views of the Government; by startling conjunctures preconcerted by the managers to madden the temper and overwhelm the discretion of the populace, and by provoking outbreak and violence as the topics for frantic appeal to the manhood and patriotism of the State. Tho unnecessary bombardment of the starving garrison of Sumter was intended to stimulate the reluctant mind of Virginia to secession. The simultaneous seizures of Gosport Navy Yard and of Harper's Ferry were the arranged stimulants to confirm the wavering resolution of that State. The futile and calamitous attempt to resist the passage of the troops through Maryland was but another spur to quicken the speed of secession, by driving the State against its better judgment into rebellion. The secession enterprise, everywhere, has been remarkably characterized by the signs of a conspiracy to give the minority a command over the majority. It avoids reference to the popular consent, screens
Doc. 264.-Harper's Ferry. Reason of the evacuation. the Richmond Enquirer says: We are now at liberty, on the best authority, to man and some of the Southern papers have called the Evacuation of Harper's Ferry. The general, like other military men of education, had long k the justness of these views. General Scott's plan was to turn Harper's Ferry by a column from Pennsylvania under General Patterson, effect at Thursday, the 16th instant, General Johnston having waited at Harper's Ferry long enough to make the enemy believe that he intended to conte endangering private property, spiked such of the heavy guns at Harper's Ferry as could not be removed, and on Saturday moved, with his whole ment, in command of a part of the forces who had retreated from Harper's Ferry, and who had been pushed forward towards Romney, as our readers Our readers will thus see what General Johnston's retreat from Harper's Ferry, has done. It has thoroughly broken up General Scott's paper p
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