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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 212
ress her soil, they will not ruffle a flower of her gardens, nor a blade of grass of her field in unkindness. No excesses will mark the footsteps of the armies of the Republic; no institution of the States will be invaded or tampered with, no rights of persons or of property will be violated. The known purposes of the Administration, and the high character of the troops employed, alike guarantee the truthfulness of this statement. When an insurrection was apprehended a few weeks since in Maryland, the Massachusetts regiment at once offered their services to suppress it. These volunteers have been denounced by the press of the South as knaves and vagrants, the dregs and offscourings of the populace, who would rather filch a handkerchief than fight an enemy in manly combat; yet we know: here, that their discipline and bearing are most admirable, and, I presume, it may be safely affirmed, that a larger amount of social position, culture, fortune, and elevation of character, has never b
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 212
ed in flames, the besieging batteries in violation of the usages of civilized warfare, instead of relaxing or suspending, redoubled their fires. A more wanton or wicked war was never commenced on any Government whose history has been written. Contemporary with and following the fall of Sumter, the siege of Fort Pickens was and still is actively pressed; the property of the United States Government continued to be seized wherever found, and its troops, by fraud or force, captured in the State of Texas in violation of a solemn compact with its authorities that they should be permitted to embark without molestation. This was the requital which the lone star State made to brave men who, through long years of peril and privation, had guarded its frontiers against the incursions of the savages. In the midst of the most active and extended warlike preparations in the South, the announcement was made by the Secretary of War of the seceded States, and echoed with taunts and insolent bravado
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 212
also with scalping knife and tomahawk. Is Kentucky willing to link her name in history with the e movement — has been formally abandoned. If Kentucky separates herself from the Union, it must be s to the support of the Southern Confederacy, Kentucky might prolong the desolating struggle that res that has ever gained credence among men. Kentucky, occupying a central position in the Union, id have stood between her bosom and every foe, Kentucky may read her own. No wonder, therefore, that ch a helpless and self-disintegrating league, Kentucky would probably soon find herself adhering to fluences, slavery will perish rapidly away in Kentucky, as a ball of snow melts in a summer's sun. e premises of a mathematical proposition. Is Kentucky prepared to see the hand upon the dial-plate ced upon the Government of the United States, Kentucky should not look so much at the means which mans. Could my voice reach every dwelling in Kentucky, I would implore its inmates — if they would [13 more...]<
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 212
State made to brave men who, through long years of peril and privation, had guarded its frontiers against the incursions of the savages. In the midst of the most active and extended warlike preparations in the South, the announcement was made by the Secretary of War of the seceded States, and echoed with taunts and insolent bravadoes by the Southern press, that Washington City was to be invaded and captured, and that the flag of the Confederate States would soon float over the dome of its Capitol. Soon thereafter there followed an invitation to all the world — embracing necessarily the outcasts and desperadoes of every sea — to accept letters of marque and reprisal, to prey upon the rich and unprotected commerce of the United States. In view of these events and threatenings, what was the duty of the Chief Magistrate of the Republic? He might have taken counsel of the revolutionists and trembled under the menaces; he might, upon the fall of Sumter, have directed that Fort Picken
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 212
ought to — but must leave the State. These words have in them decidedly the crack of the overseer's whip. The Senator evidently treats Virginia as a great negro quarter, in which the lash is the appropriate emblem of authority, and the only argument he will condescend to use. However the freemen of other parts of the State may abase themselves under the exercise of this insolent and prescriptive tyranny, should the Senator, with this scourge of slaves, endeavor to drive the people of Western Virginia from their homes, I will only say, in the language of the narrative of Gilpin's ride: “May I be there to see.” It would certainly prove a deeply interesting spectacle. It is true that before this deliverance of the popular mind of the South from the threatenings and alarm which have subdued it can be accomplished, the remorseless agitators who have made this revolution, and now hold its reins, must be discarded alike from the public confidence and the public service. The count<
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 212
tion to enforce the provisions of this law, has caused a perfect panic among the runaway slaves in the free States, and they have been escaping in multitudes into Canada, unpursued and unreclaimed by their masters. Is there found in this reason for a dissolution of the Union? That the slave States are not recognized as equals at alone saves that institution in the Border States from utter extinction. She cannot carry this law with her into the new Confederacy. She will virtually have Canada brought to her doors in the form of Free States, whose population, relieved of all moral and constitutional obligations to deliver up fugitive slaves, will stand ipes. They have floated over our cradles, let it be our prayer and our struggle that they shall float over our graves. They have been unfurled from the snows of Canada to the plains of New Orleans, and to the halls of the Montezumas, and amid the solitudes of every sea; and everywhere, as the luminous symbol of resistless and be
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 212
ey will not ruffle a flower of her gardens, nor a blade of grass of her field in unkindness. No excesses will mark the footsteps of the armies of the Republic; no institution of the States will be invaded or tampered with, no rights of persons or of property will be violated. The known purposes of the Administration, and the high character of the troops employed, alike guarantee the truthfulness of this statement. When an insurrection was apprehended a few weeks since in Maryland, the Massachusetts regiment at once offered their services to suppress it. These volunteers have been denounced by the press of the South as knaves and vagrants, the dregs and offscourings of the populace, who would rather filch a handkerchief than fight an enemy in manly combat; yet we know: here, that their discipline and bearing are most admirable, and, I presume, it may be safely affirmed, that a larger amount of social position, culture, fortune, and elevation of character, has never been found in so
Benin (Benin) (search for this): chapter 212
doors in the form of Free States, whose population, relieved of all moral and constitutional obligations to deliver up fugitive slaves, will stand with open arms inviting and welcoming them, and defending them, if need be, at the point of the bayonet. Under such influences, slavery will perish rapidly away in Kentucky, as a ball of snow melts in a summer's sun. Kentucky in her soul abhors the African slave trade, and turns away with unspeakable horror and loathing from the red altars of Dahomey. But although the traffic has been temporarily interdicted by the seceded States, it is well understood that this step has been taken as a mere measure of policy for the purpose of impressing the Border States, and of conciliating the European powers. The ultimate legalization of this trade, by a Republic professing to be based upon African servitude, must follow as certainly as does the conclusion from the premises of a mathematical proposition. Is Kentucky prepared to see the hand upon
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 212
d and captured, and that the flag of the Confederate States would soon float over the dome of its Can the rich and unprotected commerce of the United States. In view of these events and threatenins plundered from the mint at New Orleans. United States vessels were received from the defiled hanment for striking at the Government of the United States arrived, the revolutionary States leaped iThe war begun is being prosecuted by the Confederate States in a temper as fierce and unsparing as tor administration of the Government of the United States to justify, on our part, an act so solemn eir slaves into all the Territories of the United States: and this decision, which has never been rshe makes to support the Government of the United States; but as a member of the Southern Confederahas been forced upon the Government of the United States, Kentucky should not look so much at the mng bayonets. A few days since, one of the United States Senators from Virginia published a manifes[4 more...]
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 212
oly lust for power is the soil out of which it sprang. A prominent member of the band of agitators declared in one of his speeches at Charleston, last November or December, that they had been occupied for thirty years in the work of severing South Carolina from the Union. When General Jackson crushed nullification, he said it would revive again under the form of the slavery agitation: and we have lived to see his prediction verified. Indeed, that agitation, during the last fifteen or twenty yits agony is feeling their power, and we well understand how difficult will be the task of overthrowing the ascendency they have secured. But the Union men of the South--believed to be in the majority of every seceded State, except, perhaps, South Carolina--aided by the presence of the Government, will be fully equal to the emergency. Let these agitators perish, politically, if need be, by scores; “A breath can unmake them, as a breath has made.” but destroy this Republic and-- “Where is tha<
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