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Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 213
arrant, and cause the cotton or cotton yarn specified in the affidavit, to be seized and retained until an investigation can be had before the court of the Confederate States. Sec. 5. Every steamboat or railroad car which shall be used with the consent of the owner or person having the same in charge for the purpose of violating this act, shall be forfeited in like manner to the use of the Confederate States. But nothing in this act shall be so construed as to prohibit the exportation to Mexico, through its coterminous frontier. Congress C. S. A., May 21, 1861. I, J. J. Hooper, Secretary of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of an act To prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through the seaports of said States, and to punish persons offending therein, which passed Congress, and was approved on the 21st day of May, 1861. J. J. Hooper, Secretary. --Mobile Regist
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 213
1. The Congress of the Confederate States of America do enact, that, from and after the 1st day oflockade of any of the ports of the Confederate States of America by the Government of the United StUnited States, it shall not be lawful for any person to export any raw cotton or cotton yarn from the ConfedConfederate States of America, except through the seaports of the said Confederate States; and it shall bConfederate States; and it shall be the duty of all the marshals and revenue officers of the said Confederate States to prevent all viConfederate States to prevent all violations of this act. Sec. 2. If any person shall violate, or attempt to violate or evade the proe illegally exported, for the use of the Confederate States; and in addition thereto, he shall be gurfeited in like manner to the use of the Confederate States. But nothing in this act shall be so co of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a trhibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through the seaports of said Sta[1 more...]
Doc. 198.-exportation of cotton. An act to prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through the seaports of said States, and to punish persons offending therein. Section 1. The Congress of the Confederate States of America do enact, that, from and after the 1st day of June next, and during the existence of the blockade of any of the ports of the Confederate States of America by the Government of the United States, it shall not be lawful for any person to export any raw cotton or cotton yarn from the Confederate States of America, except through the seaports of the said Confederate States; and it shall be the duty of all the marshals and revenue officers of the said Confederate States to prevent all violations of this act. Sec. 2. If any person shall violate, or attempt to violate or evade the provisions of the fore-going sections, he shall forfeit all the cotton or cotton yarn thus attempted to be illegally exported, for the use of the Conf
J. J. Hooper (search for this): chapter 213
s act, shall be forfeited in like manner to the use of the Confederate States. But nothing in this act shall be so construed as to prohibit the exportation to Mexico, through its coterminous frontier. Congress C. S. A., May 21, 1861. I, J. J. Hooper, Secretary of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of an act To prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through the seaports of said Shrough its coterminous frontier. Congress C. S. A., May 21, 1861. I, J. J. Hooper, Secretary of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of an act To prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through the seaports of said States, and to punish persons offending therein, which passed Congress, and was approved on the 21st day of May, 1861. J. J. Hooper, Secretary. --Mobile Register.
Doc. 198.-exportation of cotton. An act to prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through the seaports of said States, and to punish persons offending therein. Section 1. The Congress of the Confederate States of America do enact, that, from and after the 1st day of June next, and during the existence of the blockade of any of the ports of the Confederate States of America by the Government of the United States, it shall not be lawful for any person to export any raw cotton or cotton yarn from the Confederate States of America, except through the seaports of the said Confederate States; and it shall be the duty of all the marshals and revenue officers of the said Confederate States to prevent all violations of this act. Sec. 2. If any person shall violate, or attempt to violate or evade the provisions of the fore-going sections, he shall forfeit all the cotton or cotton yarn thus attempted to be illegally exported, for the use of the Conf
May 21st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 213
ose of violating this act, shall be forfeited in like manner to the use of the Confederate States. But nothing in this act shall be so construed as to prohibit the exportation to Mexico, through its coterminous frontier. Congress C. S. A., May 21, 1861. I, J. J. Hooper, Secretary of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of an act To prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through thhrough its coterminous frontier. Congress C. S. A., May 21, 1861. I, J. J. Hooper, Secretary of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of an act To prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through the seaports of said States, and to punish persons offending therein, which passed Congress, and was approved on the 21st day of May, 1861. J. J. Hooper, Secretary. --Mobile Register.