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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 218
Doc. 202.-Col. Duryea's proclamation. Fort Monroe, Va., May 27th, 1861. Special orders No. 5.--Col. A. Duryea, Fifth Regiment Volunteers, will at once assume command of the camp of the two New York regiments, Mr. Segar's farm, and issue such orders and make such regulations, consistent with the Articles of War, as will insure good order and a thorough system of instruction and discipline; he will see that a proper guard is posted each night over the well and on and near the bridge leading toward the fort, in such manner that there can be no danger of harm to them. Any depredations committed upon the property of citizens, or any unnecessary inconvenience imposed upon them by any number of the command, must be promptly noticed and reported in writing to the Major-General commanding the Department. By command of Major-General Butler. Grier Talmadge, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. To the Inhabitants of Hampton and vicinity: Having been placed by order of Major-Gen.
posted each night over the well and on and near the bridge leading toward the fort, in such manner that there can be no danger of harm to them. Any depredations committed upon the property of citizens, or any unnecessary inconvenience imposed upon them by any number of the command, must be promptly noticed and reported in writing to the Major-General commanding the Department. By command of Major-General Butler. Grier Talmadge, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. To the Inhabitants of Hampton and vicinity: Having been placed by order of Major-Gen. Butler, in command of the troops in this vicinity, outside of the walls of Fort Monroe: hereby notify all, that their rights of person and property will be entirely respected; that their cooperation in maintaining law and order is expected, both by reporting every violation of them, when committed by any one attached to the camp, and by preserving local order and restraining such of their fellow-citizens as may entertain perverted i
Grier Talmadge (search for this): chapter 218
ystem of instruction and discipline; he will see that a proper guard is posted each night over the well and on and near the bridge leading toward the fort, in such manner that there can be no danger of harm to them. Any depredations committed upon the property of citizens, or any unnecessary inconvenience imposed upon them by any number of the command, must be promptly noticed and reported in writing to the Major-General commanding the Department. By command of Major-General Butler. Grier Talmadge, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. To the Inhabitants of Hampton and vicinity: Having been placed by order of Major-Gen. Butler, in command of the troops in this vicinity, outside of the walls of Fort Monroe: hereby notify all, that their rights of person and property will be entirely respected; that their cooperation in maintaining law and order is expected, both by reporting every violation of them, when committed by any one attached to the camp, and by preserving local order and
Doc. 202.-Col. Duryea's proclamation. Fort Monroe, Va., May 27th, 1861. Special orders No. 5.--Col. A. Duryea, Fifth Regiment Volunteers, will at once assume command of the camp of the two New York regiments, Mr. Segar's farm, and issue such orders and make such regulations, consistent with the Articles of War, as will insure good order and a thorough system of instruction and discipline; he will see that a proper guard is posted each night over the well and on and near the bridge leading toward the fort, in such manner that there can be no danger of harm to them. Any depredations committed upon the property of citizens, or any unnecessary inconvenience imposed upon them by any number of the command, must be promptly noticed and reported in writing to the Major-General commanding the Department. By command of Major-General Butler. Grier Talmadge, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. To the Inhabitants of Hampton and vicinity: Having been placed by order of Major-Gen.
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 218
ons committed upon the property of citizens, or any unnecessary inconvenience imposed upon them by any number of the command, must be promptly noticed and reported in writing to the Major-General commanding the Department. By command of Major-General Butler. Grier Talmadge, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. To the Inhabitants of Hampton and vicinity: Having been placed by order of Major-Gen. Butler, in command of the troops in this vicinity, outside of the walls of Fort Monroe: hereby nMajor-Gen. Butler, in command of the troops in this vicinity, outside of the walls of Fort Monroe: hereby notify all, that their rights of person and property will be entirely respected; that their cooperation in maintaining law and order is expected, both by reporting every violation of them, when committed by any one attached to the camp, and by preserving local order and restraining such of their fellow-citizens as may entertain perverted intentions. You can rely that all offences against you will be severely punished; that no effort will be spared to detect the guilty, and that you, as a comm
Doc. 202.-Col. Duryea's proclamation. Fort Monroe, Va., May 27th, 1861. Special orders No. 5.--Col. A. Duryea, Fifth Regiment Volunteers, will at once assume command of the camp of the two New York regiments, Mr. Segar's farm, and issue such orders and make such regulations, consistent with the Articles of War, as will insure good order and a thorough system of instruction and discipline; he will see that a proper guard is posted each night over the well and on and near the bridge leading toward the fort, in such manner that there can be no danger of harm to them. Any depredations committed upon the property of citizens, or any unnecessary inconvenience imposed upon them by any number of the command, must be promptly noticed and reported in writing to the Major-General commanding the Department. By command of Major-General Butler. Grier Talmadge, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. To the Inhabitants of Hampton and vicinity: Having been placed by order of Major-Gen.
guilty, and that you, as a community, will also be held responsible for every act committed by any one of your numbers, where the particular offender is not surrendered. Be assured that we are here in no war, against you, your liberty, your property, or even your local customs; but to keep on high that flag of which your own great son was the bearer; to sustain those institutions and those laws made by our ancestors and defended by their common blood. Remember all these things, and if there be those among you who, maddened by party feeling, misled by wilful falsehoods or a mistaken sense of duty, have thought to obliterate the national existence, let them at least pause till they learn the true value of what they have imperilled, and the nature of that into which they are asked to plunge. We have all confidence that, in Virginians in arms against us, we have honorable foes, whom we hope yet to make our friends. Col. A. Duryea, Acting Brigadier-General. N. Y. Times, May 31.
Doc. 202.-Col. Duryea's proclamation. Fort Monroe, Va., May 27th, 1861. Special orders No. 5.--Col. A. Duryea, Fifth Regiment Volunteers, will at once assume command of the camp of the two New York regiments, Mr. Segar's farm, and issue such orders and make such regulations, consistent with the Articles of War, as will iCol. A. Duryea, Fifth Regiment Volunteers, will at once assume command of the camp of the two New York regiments, Mr. Segar's farm, and issue such orders and make such regulations, consistent with the Articles of War, as will insure good order and a thorough system of instruction and discipline; he will see that a proper guard is posted each night over the well and on and near the bridge leading toward the fort, in such manner that there can be no danger of harm to them. Any depredations committed upon the property of citizens, or any unnecessary inconm at least pause till they learn the true value of what they have imperilled, and the nature of that into which they are asked to plunge. We have all confidence that, in Virginians in arms against us, we have honorable foes, whom we hope yet to make our friends. Col. A. Duryea, Acting Brigadier-General. N. Y. Times, May 31.
May 27th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 218
Doc. 202.-Col. Duryea's proclamation. Fort Monroe, Va., May 27th, 1861. Special orders No. 5.--Col. A. Duryea, Fifth Regiment Volunteers, will at once assume command of the camp of the two New York regiments, Mr. Segar's farm, and issue such orders and make such regulations, consistent with the Articles of War, as will insure good order and a thorough system of instruction and discipline; he will see that a proper guard is posted each night over the well and on and near the bridge leading toward the fort, in such manner that there can be no danger of harm to them. Any depredations committed upon the property of citizens, or any unnecessary inconvenience imposed upon them by any number of the command, must be promptly noticed and reported in writing to the Major-General commanding the Department. By command of Major-General Butler. Grier Talmadge, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. To the Inhabitants of Hampton and vicinity: Having been placed by order of Major-Gen.
guilty, and that you, as a community, will also be held responsible for every act committed by any one of your numbers, where the particular offender is not surrendered. Be assured that we are here in no war, against you, your liberty, your property, or even your local customs; but to keep on high that flag of which your own great son was the bearer; to sustain those institutions and those laws made by our ancestors and defended by their common blood. Remember all these things, and if there be those among you who, maddened by party feeling, misled by wilful falsehoods or a mistaken sense of duty, have thought to obliterate the national existence, let them at least pause till they learn the true value of what they have imperilled, and the nature of that into which they are asked to plunge. We have all confidence that, in Virginians in arms against us, we have honorable foes, whom we hope yet to make our friends. Col. A. Duryea, Acting Brigadier-General. N. Y. Times, May 31.