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Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 258
ave responsibility. The inhabitants have never taken heartily to Slavery with one accord; their soil and climate are favorable to the employment of white as well as free negro labor; they have seen, across the river, Ohio rising into high prosperity, while Kentucky made little or no progress; and there have been not a few citizens in Mr. Clay's State who have always felt that he was answerable for its inferiority in numbers, wealth, and intelligence, to the States on the opposite bank of the Ohio. Among those who have asserted the higher principles on which the State ought to have been organized, and on which it must have flourished beyond perhaps any other region in the Union, Mr. Cassius M. Clay. has been the most prominent. For a long course of years he has testified against the false policy of his State, at the risk of his life, and to the great injury of his fortunes. He has been hunted out of the State: he has been imprisoned, prosecuted, threatened, and brought within an in
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 258
remarks upon the complications of the United States of America, which, I am surprised to find, are snciples of its structure. Citizens of the United States--of the one Government (not of Confederateited States, but the constitution of the Confederate States, themselves, refusing in every case to re the wars against rebellion? So will the United States rise from the smoke of battle with renewedtest? We overthrow that political element in America which has all through our history been the ste — the old world; we in the new. If the Confederate States are right, then is England wrong. If slny of the powers to gain — by reducing the United States to a Mexican civilization? 3. Can Engla great nation which will still be The United States of America, even should we lose part of the Soutot. Your obedient servant, C. M. Clay, United States Minister Plenipotentiary, &c., to St. Petequestion, Can England afford to offend the United States? Certainly not, says Mr. Clay, for in hal[3 more...]<
West Indies (search for this): chapter 258
fore, a common interest. England was the conservator of liberty in Europe — the old world; we in the new. If the Confederate States are right, then is England wrong. If slavery must be extended in America, then must England restore it in the West Indies, blot out the most glorious page of her history, and call back her freedmen into chains! Let her say to the martyrs of freedom from all the nations who have sought refuge and a magnanimous defence on her shores, return to your scaffold and yo to be addressed to him by England, Mr. Clay becomes the questioner, and asks us where our honor would place us in this contest. Clearly by the side of the Union, because, he says, if slavery be extended in America, it must be restored in the West Indies. If any one doubts the force of this demonstration we are sorry for it, for Mr. Clay has no other to offer. Our examiner next asks us to consider our interest. Clearly, he says, it is to stand by the Union, because they are our best custome
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 258
the world to gain--England, France, or any of the powers to gain — by reducing the United States to a Mexican civilization? 3. Can England afford to offend the great nation which will still be The United States of America, even should we lose part of the South? Twenty millions of people to-day, with or without the slave States, in twenty years we will be 40,000,000! In another half century we will be one hundred millions. We will rest upon the Potomac, and on the west banks of the Mississippi River, upon the Gulf of Mexico. Our railroads will run four thousand miles upon a single parallel, binding our empire, which must master the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans. Is England so secure in the future against home revolt or foreign ambition as to venture now in our need to plant the seeds of revenge in all our future? If Ireland, or Scotland, or Wales shall attempt to secede from that beneficent government of the United Kingdom which now lightens their taxation and gives them se
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 258
s ever since fought a stout battle, by his own printing-press, public speaking, and whole course of life, on behalf of the liberties of whites and blacks, all over the Union. Such is the man who now, having just landed in England on his way to Russia, is evidently struck with surprise at the ignorance he meets with, or is led to infer from the tone of some of the newspapers on the great American question. The impulse was to write to The Times, to set the case clearly before us, and rectify sndition of the Supreme Court, under Southern management, to be aware what the North has to do in upholding justice. Fair jury trial is not to be had in half the States: the coercion of the press is as bad as any thing Mr. C. M. Clay will find in Russia: and as for representative government, we need only point to the three-fifths suffrage of the slave States, and the virtual exclusion from the polls there of all mean whites whose opinions might be supposed likely to be inconvenient. Mr. Clay is
St. Petersburg (Russia) (search for this): chapter 258
s honorable and magnanimous, she cannot. If she is wise, she will not. Your obedient servant, C. M. Clay, United States Minister Plenipotentiary, &c., to St. Petersburg. Mortley's, London, May 17. The reply of the times. We call attention to the letter of Mr. Clay, Minister from the United States to St. Petersburg. ThSt. Petersburg. This lively letter-writer proposes six questions--three relating to his own country, three relating to England. The first question he is more successful in asking than answering--What are we fighting for? We are fighting, says Mr. Clay, for nationality and liberty. We can understand a fight for nationality between different races accomplished.--London Times, May 20. Minister Clay's letter. In order to estimate the character and quality of the letter of the American Ambassador to St. Petersburg, which appeared in The Times of last Monday, and which naturally attracts a good deal of attention, it is necessary to consider who the writer is, what positi
France (France) (search for this): chapter 258
or cotton-spinners, agriculturists or manufacturers, but because we are producers and manufacturers, and have money to spend. It is not the South, as it is urged, but the North who are the best consumers of English commerce. The free white laborer and capitalist does now, and always will, consume more than the white master and the slave. The Union and the expansion of the States and the republican policy make us the best market for England and Europe. What las the world to gain--England, France, or any of the powers to gain — by reducing the United States to a Mexican civilization? 3. Can England afford to offend the great nation which will still be The United States of America, even should we lose part of the South? Twenty millions of people to-day, with or without the slave States, in twenty years we will be 40,000,000! In another half century we will be one hundred millions. We will rest upon the Potomac, and on the west banks of the Mississippi River, upon the Gulf of Mexi
America (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 258
s the conservator of liberty in Europe — the old world; we in the new. If the Confederate States are right, then is England wrong. If slavery must be extended in America, then must England restore it in the West Indies, blot out the most glorious page of her history, and call back her freedmen into chains! Let her say to the martbecomes the questioner, and asks us where our honor would place us in this contest. Clearly by the side of the Union, because, he says, if slavery be extended in America, it must be restored in the West Indies. If any one doubts the force of this demonstration we are sorry for it, for Mr. Clay has no other to offer. Our examinernt to a hundred millions of people, and will have railways four thousand miles long. But is Mr. Clay quite sure that, if we should offend them now, the people of America will bear malice for half a century; and, if they do, is he quite certain that his hundred millions must all be members of one Confederacy, and that we may not th
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 258
s, and encourage the immigration of free labor; but Mr. Clay discountenanced the notion, and used his influence with success, to induce his neighbors to follow the Southern practice in regard to the tenure of labor. To do this in such a country as Kentucky was to incur a very grave responsibility. The inhabitants have never taken heartily to Slavery with one accord; their soil and climate are favorable to the employment of white as well as free negro labor; they have seen, across the river, Ohio rising into high prosperity, while Kentucky made little or no progress; and there have been not a few citizens in Mr. Clay's State who have always felt that he was answerable for its inferiority in numbers, wealth, and intelligence, to the States on the opposite bank of the Ohio. Among those who have asserted the higher principles on which the State ought to have been organized, and on which it must have flourished beyond perhaps any other region in the Union, Mr. Cassius M. Clay. has been
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 258
a relative of the late Henry Clay; but he has never followed the political track of his eminent relative. Henry Clay used to boast that it was by his doing that Kentucky was a slave State. At the time of its organization as a State, a majority of the inhabitants desired to emancipate their negroes, and encourage the immigration , and used his influence with success, to induce his neighbors to follow the Southern practice in regard to the tenure of labor. To do this in such a country as Kentucky was to incur a very grave responsibility. The inhabitants have never taken heartily to Slavery with one accord; their soil and climate are favorable to the employment of white as well as free negro labor; they have seen, across the river, Ohio rising into high prosperity, while Kentucky made little or no progress; and there have been not a few citizens in Mr. Clay's State who have always felt that he was answerable for its inferiority in numbers, wealth, and intelligence, to the States o
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