hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Doc 578 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 485 1 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 430 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 416 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 310 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 304 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 253 1 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 242 4 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 192 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 154 total hits in 70 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
they were met by the Committee of the Sons of Maine, who escorted them through Battery Place and Bok place. The flag is the gift of the Sons of Maine, residing in New York. Before the ceremony ofrict Attorney, who spoke as follows: men of Maine, citizens of the Union :--I had expected to prark. I am somewhat surprised that soldiers of Maine should not have faced the storm, for as soldiee a forest of gibbets. My friends, the men of Maine resident in this city have desired to bid you that shines in the sunrise over the forests of Maine crimsons the sunset's dying beams on the goldeide the hut of the fisherman and the pioneer. Maine is the child of Massachusetts, and in your heame of their boy. Sir, in behalf of the Sons of Maine in this city, I give you this flag. Guard it oward responded as follows:--Brethren, sons of Maine, brethren of New York, brethren of the Union, by the instructions of the Governor of the State of Maine. The regiment is fully armed and equipped
Portland (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
r. ZZZFen. G. Barker of Augusta, accompanies the regiment. A full drum corps is also attached. Col. Howard is a graduate of West Point, and until recently was Professor of Mathematics in the West Point Academy. He says he was fifteen or twenty minutes behind time at Augusta and at Boston, but that he should endeavor to be more punctual in his departure from New York. Such prompt action will astonish the laggards in New York, who are usually three or four hours behind. Major Sewell of Portland accompanies the regiment, by the instructions of the Governor of the State of Maine. The regiment is fully armed and equipped, and have tents and camp equipage. The uniform is Canada gray throughout. The march through Broadway was enthusiastically cheered by those who had courage enough to brave the storm. At 5 o'clock the regiment left for Philadelphia via Camden and Amboy. For the purpose of going through Baltimore respectably, the Colonel ordered the men to be supplied with ten roun
Quiquechan River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
S. Hazeltine; First Lieutenant, N. Hanscomb; Second Lieutenant, W. A. Hatch. Co. H--Captain, Wm. S. Heath; First Lieutenant, Frank E. Heath; Second Lieutenant, John R. Day. Co. I--Captain, Moses B. Lakeman; First Lieutenant, Albert R. Quimby; Second Lieutenant, Henry M. Rines. Co. K--Captain, Newell Strout; First Lieutenant, B. S. Kelley; Second Lieutenant, Wm. Elder.--National Intelligencer, June 9. This regiment arrived in New York on the 6th of June, by the steamer Bay State, of the Fall River line. It left Augusta, at 5:80 A. M., on Wednesday. In Boston they met with a generous reception, which took the form of a hearty supper. On their arrival at Pier No. 4 North River, they were met by the Committee of the Sons of Maine, who escorted them through Battery Place and Broadway to the White street Arsenal, where the men piled arms, unslung their knapsacks, and made themselves as comfortable as the circumstances would permit. The ceremony of the presentation of a handsome Unite
Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
endeavor to be more punctual in his departure from New York. Such prompt action will astonish the laggards in New York, who are usually three or four hours behind. Major Sewell of Portland accompanies the regiment, by the instructions of the Governor of the State of Maine. The regiment is fully armed and equipped, and have tents and camp equipage. The uniform is Canada gray throughout. The march through Broadway was enthusiastically cheered by those who had courage enough to brave the storm. At 5 o'clock the regiment left for Philadelphia via Camden and Amboy. For the purpose of going through Baltimore respectably, the Colonel ordered the men to be supplied with ten rounds each of ball cartridge, which was done on board the Bay State. The Rev. L. C. Lockwood, on behalf of the Y. M. C. A. of New York, presented to the regiment, before their departure, 250 Soldiers' Text Books, donated by a lady of the city, and 200 of Horace Waters' Patriotic Song Books.--N. Y. Tribune, June 7.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
Forge, and Yorktown. Those stars tell the story of our nation's growth, how it has come from weakness to strength, from thirteen States to thirty-four, until the gleam that shines in the sunrise over the forests of Maine crimsons the sunset's dying beams on the golden sands of California. Let not the story of the flag be folded now, and lost forever. Wherever your axe has rung, the school-house has been reared alongside the hut of the fisherman and the pioneer. Maine is the child of Massachusetts, and in your hearts flows the blood of the Old Bay State. Soldiers! I know that every heart gives an eager response to those which the Massachusetts man uttered as he fell stricken by a Maryland mob, All hail to the Stars and Stripes. (Tremendous cheering.) We give this flag to you, and with it we give you our prayers, and not ours alone, but as the loved home circle gathers far in the Pine Tree State, gray-haired fathers and loving mothers will speak in prayer the name of their boy. S
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
me pledge that speaks of softer and sweeter hours. Your brethern in this hour of battle would give you a strong man's gift — your country's flag. That flag shall be your guardian. Its starry eyes shall look upon you in watchful love — its blended stripes shall stream above you with protection. It is the flag of history. Those thirteen stripes tell the story of our colonial struggle, of the days of ‘76. They speak of the wilderness savage, of old Independence Hall, of Valley Forge, and Yorktown. Those stars tell the story of our nation's growth, how it has come from weakness to strength, from thirteen States to thirty-four, until the gleam that shines in the sunrise over the forests of Maine crimsons the sunset's dying beams on the golden sands of California. Let not the story of the flag be folded now, and lost forever. Wherever your axe has rung, the school-house has been reared alongside the hut of the fisherman and the pioneer. Maine is the child of Massachusetts, and in y<
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
of the Sons of Maine in this city, I give you this flag. Guard it as a woman guards her honor, as children keep the ashes of their father. That flag shall float in triumph, on your avenging march, as those steel fingers point the way through Baltimore to Sumter. That flag shall hover with more than mother's love over your dead. We hear to-day, above the sound of conflict, the voice of the Archangel crying, Victory is on the side of Liberty, Victory is on the side of Law. With unbroken ranorm is Canada gray throughout. The march through Broadway was enthusiastically cheered by those who had courage enough to brave the storm. At 5 o'clock the regiment left for Philadelphia via Camden and Amboy. For the purpose of going through Baltimore respectably, the Colonel ordered the men to be supplied with ten rounds each of ball cartridge, which was done on board the Bay State. The Rev. L. C. Lockwood, on behalf of the Y. M. C. A. of New York, presented to the regiment, before their de
North River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
tain, Moses B. Lakeman; First Lieutenant, Albert R. Quimby; Second Lieutenant, Henry M. Rines. Co. K--Captain, Newell Strout; First Lieutenant, B. S. Kelley; Second Lieutenant, Wm. Elder.--National Intelligencer, June 9. This regiment arrived in New York on the 6th of June, by the steamer Bay State, of the Fall River line. It left Augusta, at 5:80 A. M., on Wednesday. In Boston they met with a generous reception, which took the form of a hearty supper. On their arrival at Pier No. 4 North River, they were met by the Committee of the Sons of Maine, who escorted them through Battery Place and Broadway to the White street Arsenal, where the men piled arms, unslung their knapsacks, and made themselves as comfortable as the circumstances would permit. The ceremony of the presentation of a handsome United States flag, here took place. The flag is the gift of the Sons of Maine, residing in New York. Before the ceremony of presentation took place, Col. Howard requested that, if any c
Valley Forge (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
one has given some pledge that speaks of softer and sweeter hours. Your brethern in this hour of battle would give you a strong man's gift — your country's flag. That flag shall be your guardian. Its starry eyes shall look upon you in watchful love — its blended stripes shall stream above you with protection. It is the flag of history. Those thirteen stripes tell the story of our colonial struggle, of the days of ‘76. They speak of the wilderness savage, of old Independence Hall, of Valley Forge, and Yorktown. Those stars tell the story of our nation's growth, how it has come from weakness to strength, from thirteen States to thirty-four, until the gleam that shines in the sunrise over the forests of Maine crimsons the sunset's dying beams on the golden sands of California. Let not the story of the flag be folded now, and lost forever. Wherever your axe has rung, the school-house has been reared alongside the hut of the fisherman and the pioneer. Maine is the child of Massach<
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 260
fifteen or twenty minutes behind time at Augusta and at Boston, but that he should endeavor to be more punctual in his departure from New York. Such prompt action will astonish the laggards in New York, who are usually three or four hours behind. Major Sewell of Portland accompanies the regiment, by the instructions of the Governor of the State of Maine. The regiment is fully armed and equipped, and have tents and camp equipage. The uniform is Canada gray throughout. The march through Broadway was enthusiastically cheered by those who had courage enough to brave the storm. At 5 o'clock the regiment left for Philadelphia via Camden and Amboy. For the purpose of going through Baltimore respectably, the Colonel ordered the men to be supplied with ten rounds each of ball cartridge, which was done on board the Bay State. The Rev. L. C. Lockwood, on behalf of the Y. M. C. A. of New York, presented to the regiment, before their departure, 250 Soldiers' Text Books, donated by a lady of
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...