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Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
fore I was able to shape the order in question, General Johnston and, soon thereafter, General Bragg, came to your room, at your headquarters, where I had gone also, to consult you upon some details. You were explaining your plan of movement, and of the attack, to General Johnston, when I entered your apartment; and, to make the subject clearer, you drew a sketch of the country, in pencil, upon your table, The table bearing the diagram here referred to went, as office furniture, to Charleston, S. C., where the pencil sketch on the board was visible two years afterwards. as I had taken to my office the sketch supplied by the engineers, to enable me to write the order with the necessary precision. General Johnston weighed all that was said with much deliberation, and not until every detail had been very thoroughly discussed did he decide to make the movement, as you proposed it. By this time, Major-Generals Polk and Hardee had likewise arrived. I then remarked that, as the prep
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
the prolongation of our presence in front of their positions before the hour for battle, next morning; that the Federal army would, no doubt, be found intrenched to the eyes, and ready for our attack; that it was unwise to push, against breastworks, troops so raw and undisciplined as ours, badly armed and worse equipped, while their antagonists, besides the advantage of number, position, discipline, and superiority of arms, were largely composed of men lately victorious at Forts Henry and Donelson; that, from his experience in the war with Mexico and, more recently, at Manassas and Centreville, he considered volunteers, when well commanded and occupying strong defensive positions, equal to regulars, if attacked in front, as the Federals would be by us; General Sherman, in his Memoirs, says of the Federal position: The position was naturally strong, with Snake Creek on our right, a deep, bold stream, with a confluent (Owl Creek) to our right front, and Lick Creek, with a similar co
Lick Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
left resting on Owl Creek, its right towards Lick Creek, supported on that flank by half its cavalry between the extreme right of this corps and Lick Creek will be filled by a brigade or division—accoto Pittsburg, passing through Griersford, on Lick Creek. The cavalry will throw well forward advaonfluent (Owl Creek) to our right front, and Lick Creek, with a similar confluent, on our left, thus, with only slight alteration: Two streams, Lick and Owl Creeks—the latter a confluent of Snake as the land rises highest and ridgelike near Lick Creek. Adjoining the river these ravines, deep anr's side— lay three miles below the mouth of Lick Creek. Two roads leading from Corinth, crossing th 5th, at the intersection of the Griersford (Lick Creek) and Ridge roads, from Corinth to Pittsburg,ed from near Owl Creek, on the left, to near Lick Creek, on the right, a distance of less than threes right wing, between the Pittsburg road and Lick Creek. His cavalry protected and supported his ri[1 more...
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
who had been on picket duty at and about Pittsburg Landing, before the appearance of the enemy at tmbers. That our adversary's position at Pittsburg Landing, with his back against a deep, broad rivand method of the movement from Corinth upon Pittsburg, with peculiar minuteness, as, from the woodts line of march by the Ridge road, hence to Pittsburg, half an hour after the rear of the Third Cos or of Pratt's house, on the direct road to Pittsburg, if that road is found practicable, or in th, as far as its intersection with the one to Pittsburg, passing through Griersford, on Lick Creek. to attack the Federal forces at or about Pittsburg Landing. And I know, also, that the result of tdly towards Crump's Landing, six miles below Pittsburg. Another, near the river bank, crossing Snahind General Bragg's right wing, between the Pittsburg road and Lick Creek. His cavalry protected d when required on the right and left of the Pittsburg road, or otherwise, according to exigencies.[6 more...]
Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
f Shiloh, General Grant telegraphed General Buell, who was then at Savannah, that he was heavily attacked by one hundred thousand men, and tha at Franklin, on his way to form a junction with General Grant, at Savannah, where he might be expected early in April. It was known, howevert Mickey's house, at the intersection of the road from Monterey to Savannah. The cavalry, thrown well forward during the march, to reconnoitr, the right wing, with left in front, by the road from Monterey to Savannah, the head of column to reach the immediate vicinity of Mickey's ht. The cavalry with this wing will take position on the road to Savannah, beyond Mickey's, as far as Owl Creek, having advanced guards and be ordered forward, at once, to scout on the road from Monterey to Savannah, between Mickey's and its intersection with the Pittsburg-Purdy rom them we learned that General Grant had returned for the night to Savannah, and that General Sherman commanded the advanced forces. No other
general reserve of about half as many. This second purpose was apparently accomplished, for, during the battle of Shiloh, General Grant telegraphed General Buell, who was then at Savannah, that he was heavily attacked by one hundred thousand men, and that he needed his immediate assistance. In the general orders given above, General Beauregard was announced as second in command, and General Bragg was appointed, nominally, Chief of the General Staff, a position borrowed from Continental European armies, though there was no provision for such an arrangement made by law in the Confederate military service; it was, however, an irregularity not considered important, inasmuch as General Bragg was not to be detached or diverted from the command of his corps. In fact, his designation to that position was simply to enable him, in a contingency on the field, to give orders in the name of the General-in-Chief, or of the second in command; an arrangement which both Generals Johnston and Bea
Owl Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
of Shiloh Church, with his right resting on Owl Creek, and his left on Lick Creek. 1. The Thirdhe nature of the ground, its left resting on Owl Creek, its right towards Lick Creek, supported on road to Savannah, beyond Mickey's, as far as Owl Creek, having advanced guards and pickets well to ight, a deep, bold stream, with a confluent (Owl Creek) to our right front, and Lick Creek, with a slight alteration: Two streams, Lick and Owl Creeks—the latter a confluent of Snake Creek, whichof ravines, the drainage is principally into Owl Creek, as the land rises highest and ridgelike neao approach from all directions; one, passing Owl Creek by a bridge before its junction with Snake Ceight thousand men, on the northwest side of Owl Creek. He then supposed our force was sixty thousst, under General Hardee, extended from near Owl Creek, on the left, to near Lick Creek, on the rigf the Pittsburg road, between the latter and Owl Creek. The front of the column was about eight hu
Shiloh Church (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
uld begin, and make, the advance, with their respective corps, to the vicinity of the enemy's position, as will be found set forth in the written order, which was afterwards printed as follows: Headquarters army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., April 3d, 1862. Special orders, no. 8. I. In the impending movement, the corps of this army will march, assemble, and take order of battle, in the following manner, it being assumed that the enemy is in position about a mile in advance of Shiloh Church, with his right resting on Owl Creek, and his left on Lick Creek. 1. The Third Corps, under Major-General Hardee, will advance, as soon as practicable, on the Ridge road from Corinth, to what is known as the Bark road, passing about half a mile northward of the workhouse. The head of this column will bivouac, if possible, to-night, at Mickey's house, at the intersection of the road from Monterey to Savannah. The cavalry, thrown well forward during the march, to reconnoitre and preve
Hamburg, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
her in the direction of Mickey's or of Pratt's house, on the direct road to Pittsburg, if that road is found practicable, or in the direction of the Ridge road to Hamburg, throwing all its cavalry on the latter road, as far as its intersection with the one to Pittsburg, passing through Griersford, on Lick Creek. The cavalry will throw well forward advanced guards and videttes towards Griersford and in the direction of Hamburg, and during the impending battle, when called to the field of combat, will move by the Griersford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama and Desha's Arkansas battalion, and Ba
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
conditions. But it may be fair to infer that he judged of their number by the effect they produced. Thus it was that Mr. Lincoln was sorely puzzled during the war at his commanding generals reporting constantly that they had fought the Rebels with inferior numbers. In the instance of the battle of Shiloh, this phenomenon might, however, possibly have happened; for in about thirty days, with our defective means of transportation, we had collected at Corinth, from Murfreesboroa, Pensacola, Mobile, New Orleans, and other distant points, an effective force of over forty thousand men of all arms, while the Federals had failed to bring together, in time, at Pittsburg Landing, notwithstanding their ample means of land and water transportation, the armies of Buell, from Nashville, Tennessee, and of Pope, from southeast Missouri. Yet the Confederate army had advanced and was then assembled at Monterey and vicinity, less than nine miles in his front. Our forces, as they had arrived in
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