hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
G. T. Beauregard 2,953 73 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 459 3 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 448 0 Browse Search
L. Polk 387 13 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 380 16 Browse Search
A. S. Johnston 328 0 Browse Search
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) 260 6 Browse Search
W. J. Hardee 241 3 Browse Search
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) 207 115 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 206 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

Found 428 total hits in 93 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
her fate to that of the Southern Confederacy. One of the regiments of Bonham's brigade (Gregg's) had been sent in advance to Norfolk. Its mission was to take possession of the navy-yard and protect all public property there. This was a judicious movement. The many cannon and mortars, and the ammunition stored at Norfolk, were of the greatest value to the Confederacy, then almost entirely destitute of such important supplies. The whole brigade was soon afterwards concentrated at Manassas Junction, in the Department of Alexandria, or the Alexandria line, as it was also called, the command of which devolved upon General Bonham. He remained there until relieved, on the 1st of June, by General Beauregard. As soon as he could be spared from Charleston, General Beauregard made a thorough reconnoissance of the South Carolina coast, from Charleston to Port Royal. This he did at the special request of Governor Pickens, the object being the adoption of a system of defence to be car
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
war-vessels for the South, shows, on the contrary, how great was the folly, how disastrous to our interests the nonacceptance of the contract almost effected, in London, by the house of John Frazer & Co. And Mr. Davis says also: It has been shown that among the first acts of the Confederate administration was the effort to buyan with anything else. I regarded them as the lungs of the country, which, once really closed, asphyxia must follow. I therefore took an early occasion to go to London to see what could be had in the shape of vessels fit to take and keep the sea, for a lengthened period, and strong enough to carry an armament which would render itely more importance to the cause. The letter states, further, that Major Huse had steamer-loads of arms, ammunition, and accoutrements, in divers warehouses of London, but that he could make no shipments to the South, because of his having to fight two governments, and because of the wharfingers' orders not to ship or deliver,
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ps called by South Carolina, which were gradually mustered into the Provisional Army of the Confederate States. Early in May, a brigade of four regiments of South Carolina volunteers was organized, under Brigadier-General Bonham. It consisted of the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, Colonel Gregg; the 2d South Carolina Volunteers, Colonel Kershaw; the 3d South Carolina Volunteers, Colonel Williams; and the 8th South Carolina Volunteers, Colonel Cash. That brigade, made up of the flower of Carolina's chivalry, was sent to Virginia, by order of the War Department, the Old Dominion having, on the 17th of April—four days after the fall of Sumter—joined her fate to that of the Southern Confederacy. One of the regiments of Bonham's brigade (Gregg's) had been sent in advance to Norfolk. Its mission was to take possession of the navy-yard and protect all public property there. This was a judicious movement. The many cannon and mortars, and the ammunition stored at Norfolk, were of the
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
eneral Beauregard makes a reconnoissance of the South Carolina coast. recommends works at Stono, the two Edisngress. Resolutions of the General Assembly of South Carolina. General Beauregard is called to Montgomery. nization and discipline of the troops called by South Carolina, which were gradually mustered into the Provisieauregard made a thorough reconnoissance of the South Carolina coast, from Charleston to Port Royal. This he s command, and to the gallant troops of the State of South Carolina, for the skill, fortitude, and courage by wer his command. Approved May 4th, 1861. South Carolina almost adopted General Beauregard as one of her861. Resolved, That the General Assembly of South Carolina, in grateful recognition of the distinguished sere accordingly sent to the Military Academy of South Carolina, and there enjoyed all the privileges of State to be on the cars, and by Governor Manning, of South Carolina, one of General Beauregard's volunteer aids.
Santa Rosa Island (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ival at Montgomery he was informed that the President desired to send him to Pensacola, to co-operate with General Bragg, and assist him in the execution of a plan—much thought of at the time—the main object of which --was the taking of Fort Pickens. It must be remembered that no sooner had the State of Alabama withdrawn from the Union than the Federal forces stationed at Pensacola, in imitation of Major Anderson, evacuated Fort Barrancas, on the mainland, to occupy Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa Island—a much stronger, and in every way a more inaccessible, work. The fort being in Confederate waters, the authorities at Montgomery feared that its occupancy by the enemy would imply weakness on the part of our government, and might possibly shake the confidence of the people. It had, therefore, been determined to pursue a course towards Fort Pickens similar to that which had been so successfully adopted against Fort Sumter. Hence the desire for the services and experience of him who<
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
t in date was a telegram from President Davis, which read as follows: Montgomery, April 13th, 1861. To General G. T. Beauregard: Thanks for your achieveme Anderson. Jefferson Davis. Then, from the Secretary of War: Montgomery, April 13th, 1861. To General Beauregard: Accept my congratulations. Youation already indicated the influence he would soon exercise over it: Montgomery, April 16th, 1861. My dear General,—In the midst of the eclat of your gloequiring his immediate presence at the seat of government. On his arrival at Montgomery he was informed that the President desired to send him to Pensacola, to co-opaccessible, work. The fort being in Confederate waters, the authorities at Montgomery feared that its occupancy by the enemy would imply weakness on the part of ouever, that as early as February, 1861, the third day after my inauguration at Montgomery, he had directed Captain (afterwards Admiral) Semmes, as agent of the Confede
Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
s he must, how is it possible that he could have rejected the Trenholm offer—as he unquestionably did—if at that time he had a naval officer in Europe, sent thither to effect the identical purchase he then declined? Was it that our government could not have accepted any such proposal, except through the medium of the agent already alluded to? Why not, then, have referred the house of John Frazer & Co. to him, or him to that house? Mr. Prioleau, one of the firm of John Frazer & Co., of Liverpool, through whose hands had passed the negotiations relative to the purchase of these vessels, wrote to General Beauregard the following letter on the subject. It confirms the extracts from Mr. Trenholm's letter, as given above; and adds so much interest to the point under consideration, that we feel justified in submitting it without curtailment. Bruges, September 25th, 1880. My dear General,—The facts with reference to the proposed fleet of armed vessels for the service of the C<
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
order of the War Department, the Old Dominion having, on the 17th of April—four days after the fall of Sumter—joined her fate to that of the Southern Confederacy. One of the regiments of Bonham's brigade (Gregg's) had been sent in advance to Norfolk. Its mission was to take possession of the navy-yard and protect all public property there. This was a judicious movement. The many cannon and mortars, and the ammunition stored at Norfolk, were of the greatest value to the Confederacy, then Norfolk, were of the greatest value to the Confederacy, then almost entirely destitute of such important supplies. The whole brigade was soon afterwards concentrated at Manassas Junction, in the Department of Alexandria, or the Alexandria line, as it was also called, the command of which devolved upon General Bonham. He remained there until relieved, on the 1st of June, by General Beauregard. As soon as he could be spared from Charleston, General Beauregard made a thorough reconnoissance of the South Carolina coast, from Charleston to Port Royal.
Fort Barrancas (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
his immediate presence at the seat of government. On his arrival at Montgomery he was informed that the President desired to send him to Pensacola, to co-operate with General Bragg, and assist him in the execution of a plan—much thought of at the time—the main object of which --was the taking of Fort Pickens. It must be remembered that no sooner had the State of Alabama withdrawn from the Union than the Federal forces stationed at Pensacola, in imitation of Major Anderson, evacuated Fort Barrancas, on the mainland, to occupy Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa Island—a much stronger, and in every way a more inaccessible, work. The fort being in Confederate waters, the authorities at Montgomery feared that its occupancy by the enemy would imply weakness on the part of our government, and might possibly shake the confidence of the people. It had, therefore, been determined to pursue a course towards Fort Pickens similar to that which had been so successfully adopted against Fort Sumter.<
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
, whose zeal and efforts were untiring, General Beauregard finally yielded, and drew out a plan for the defence of Port Royal, with the distinct requirement, however, that the field-works proposed in the plan should be armed with the heaviest ordnance, chiefly 10-inch and rifled guns, and that a steel-clad floating battery, with a similar armament, should be moored midway between the two field-works. His explanation was, that while the harbors of New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Charleston, Savannah, and New Orleans—the entrances to which are from half a mile to one and a quarter miles broad—require strongly casemated forts, armed with several hundred guns of heavy caliber, it could not be expected that Port Royal harbor, with an entrance nearly three miles wide and twenty-six feet deep, could be effectively protected by small, hastily constructed fieldworks, inadequately armed. What General Beauregard had predicted was unfortunately realized. In the autumn of that year the enemy's
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...