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unsafe the service of two guns hitherto available in that quarter. On the exterior, the chief injury done is to be noticed at southeast pass coupe and two next upper casemates on east front. From these localities the scarp has fallen away completely, and left the arches exposed, as well as the sand filling half down to the floor of the second tier. At 11.40 P. M. six monitors opened on Fort Sumter from distances of eight hundred to one thousand yards. They were joined, at 1 A. M., on the 2d, by the Ironsides, and together fired 185 shots, of which 116 struck outside, 35 inside, and 34 passed over. The projectiles used were 8-inch Parrotts, rifleshell, and 11 and 15 inch smooth-bore shot and shell. Fort Sumter was unable to answer, not having a gun in working order, but a heavy fire was kept up on the fleet from Fort Moultrie with good effect, two of the monitors being apparently injured, and requiring assistance when they retired. The effect of this fire on Fort Sumter was t
eneral,—I arrived in Charleston on the 13th of September, 1862, and assumed command on the 24th of that month. In the interval I was engaged in ascertaining the plans and measures taken by Major-General Pemberton, my predecessor, for the defence, particularly, of Charleston and Savannah, and in rapid inspections of the condition and defensive resources of the Department, the results of which were communicated to the War Department in two papers, dated, the one relative to Charleston, on the 3d, and the other, chiefly concerning Savannah, on the 10th of October, 1862. At the time the troops in that Department (as then arranged) consisted of— In South Carolina. Infantry6,564 Artillery in position1,787 Field artillery1,379 Cavalry2,817 ——12,547 In Georgia. Infantry3,834 Artillery in position1,330 Field artillery445 Cavalry1,580 ——7,189 —— Total of all arms in Department19,736 Of this force, 1787 artillery in position, 727 light artillerists, 4139 infantr
for an attempt to capture the enemy's pickets in the Marsh Battery, near Vincent's Creek. On the 5th the guns in Battery Wagner were all in fighting order. Our sharp-shooters, armed with Whitworth g the night of the 4th the enemy's approach was pushed close to Battery Wagner. At 12 M., on the 5th, the Federal flag, which had been one hundred yards south of Wagner, was abreast of the south an to believe that the enemy's plan was to carry Battery Gregg by a boat attack on the night of the 5th, or early on the morning of the 6th; that the fleet should prevent the landing of reinforcements purpose sailors or men able to handle boats and oars with efficiency were essential. On the 5th inst. Brigadier-General Ripley, commanding the First Military District, prepared, by my order, as pehed; the whole fort is much weakened; a repetition to-morrow of to-day's fire (alluding to the 5th inst.) will make the work almost a ruin. The mortar fire is still very heavy and fatal, and no impo
ia: My scouts report shipment of troops, both infantry and cavalry, from Norfolk, supposed for Charleston. Large quantities of forage shipped. Cavalry left 6th inst. The Chief-Engineer was instructed to lay out and erect a line of works on James Island from Secessionville to Dill's house, in lieu of the present defensive e fleet should prevent the landing of reinforcements at Cummings's Point; that Battery Wagner should be shelled fiercely by the ironclads; and on the morning of the 6th, on a given signal, the assault on Battery Wagner was to take place. This plan was frustrated, however, by the repulse of the attacking party on Battery Gregg. About 1.30 A. M.; on the morning of the 6th, they were seen approaching, in from fifteen to twenty barges, by the passages leading from Vincent and Schooner creeks that lie between James and Morris islands. The garrison at Cummings's Point was on the alert, and received them with a brisk fire of grape and musketry. The enemy was
o send 500 infantry and one light battery to report to Brigadier-General Mercer, in Savannah. The enemy on Morris Island worked laboriously on his batteries and trenches, while strong reinforcements of troops were daily seen arriving. On the 7th I received a telegram from you informing me that the balance of Colquitt's brigade was ordered to Charleston. There was little firing throughout the day. Only two casualties occurred on Morris Island. On the 8th Brigadier-General Evans reporgazines, therefore, were not destroyed. The guns in the batteries were spiked as far as their condition allowed, and the implements generally destroyed, and equipments carried off. The evacuation was concluded at about 1 1/2 h. A. M. of the 7th inst. The boats containing the portion of the garrison last embarked were fired upon by the enemy's barges, but without effect. Only two of our boats, containing crews of about 19 men and 27 soldiers—or some 46 in all—were captured by the enemy's ar
uch destructive raids as devastated the Combahee some days ago. Thus far, however, I can see no evidence of reduction. General Hunter was at Hilton Head on the 8th instant; his troops hold the same positions as heretofore, and apparently in the same force—a brigade on Folly, one on Seabrook's Island, and the balance on the islandsthe balance of Colquitt's brigade was ordered to Charleston. There was little firing throughout the day. Only two casualties occurred on Morris Island. On the 8th Brigadier-General Evans reported his arrival in Savannah. A large increase was visible in the enemy's fleet in the Stono. During the day firing at intervals was th, 1863. Brig.-General Q. A. Gillmore, Commanding U. S. Forces, etc., etc.: General,—Your letter of the 5th was not received at these Headquarters until the 8th instant. I cannot bandy allegations with you, and much less shall I emulate the temper and spirit in which your communication was conceived; but will simply confine
if the purpose of the enemy be to send his reinforcements to the Mississippi, you will go on and co-operate with General Johnston in that quarter. This I answered by a telegram, on the 13th of same month, as follows: Enemy's ironclads and forces still as heretofore reported to Department, excepting a gunboat expedition reported in Altamaha, and one preparing for St. John's River, Florida. I will prepare as far as practicable for contingencies referred to in Department's letter, 10th inst. Please send me any positive information relative to movements or intentions of enemy. But, in order that the War Department should be thoroughly cognizant of the state of affairs in my Department, I further addressed to you a letter, on the 15th June, in which I pointed out how utterly insufficient were the forces at my command to resist those of the enemy, and that on my own responsibility I could not further deplete the force in the Department. I drew your attention, in this same le
n the south end of Morris Island. the enemy carries the position. want of labor to fortify, and of infantry support, the cause of lodgment. strong demonstration against James Island by way of the Stono. the enemy assaults Battery Wagner on the 11th. is repulsed with loss. General Beauregard again appeals for negro labor. on the morning of the 16th General Hagood attacks the enemy on James Island, and drives him back.—the enemy's concentration on Little Folly and Morris islands. nine hunds were yet in position. My telegram to you of that date was: Nothing of importance has occurred since yesterday. Evans's brigade is arriving in Savannah, and Colquitt's regiments arriving here. About seven o'clock on the morning of the 11th, the fleet and land batteries opened heavily on Battery Wagner, and were replied to by Fort Sumter and Batteries Simkins and Gregg. One casualty occurred during the day, the enemy as well as ourselves working persistently, in spite of the exces
in his vicinity. Hagood reports 2500 infantry on Seabrook's Island fortifying; five monitors still there. Enemy in force on Folly Island, actively erecting batteries yesterday. Season favorable for enemy's operations for quite a month. On the 12th I telegraphed as follows to the Hon. the Secretary of War: Have ordered to General Pemberton (contrary to my opinion) Evans's brigade and one regiment, amounting to 2700 men, leaving only 6000 infantry available in whole South Carolina and Geomkins and Gregg. One casualty occurred during the day, the enemy as well as ourselves working persistently, in spite of the excessive heat. Our garrison on Morris Island consisted of 1245, of all arms. At 5.45 A. M., on the morning of the 12th, the enemy opened on Fort Sumter with an 8-inch Parrott gun, firing from a battery north and west of Craig's Hill, Morris Island—distance estimated to be at least forty-four hundred yards. Eleven shots, in all, were fired at the fort; four missed,
an attack, if one should be designated at that place; but if the purpose of the enemy be to send his reinforcements to the Mississippi, you will go on and co-operate with General Johnston in that quarter. This I answered by a telegram, on the 13th of same month, as follows: Enemy's ironclads and forces still as heretofore reported to Department, excepting a gunboat expedition reported in Altamaha, and one preparing for St. John's River, Florida. I will prepare as far as practicable fadvanced trenches, and, in conjunction with Fort Sumter and Battery Simkins, prevented any progress on the part of the enemy. His batteries in rear replied to the fire of Wagner, and interrupted our communications with Cummings's Point. On the 13th the enemy endeavored several times to repair the damages done to his advanced works during the preceding night, but well-directed shots from Battery Wagner as often drove him back. The batteries in rear and the fleet then opened fire on Wagner an
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