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France (France) (search for this): chapter 10
rn Congressmen, the advocates of slavery brought forward, in the famous Nebraska and Kansas Bill, the iniquitous scheme of abrogating the Missouri Compromise of 1820, prohibiting slavery, that State alone excepted, from all the territory ceded by France to the United States, lying north of 36° 30′ north latitude. After various modifications, the bill came before the Senate on the 30th of January, 1854, when Stephen A. Douglas made a violent attack on Mr. Chase of Ohio, and Mr. Sumner, for havinrie, field, and forest, interlaced by silver streams, skirted by protecting mountains, and constituting the heart of the North-American continent; only a little smaller, let me add, than three great European countries combined,--Italy, Spain, and France,--each of which in succession has dominated over the globe. This territory has already been likened on this floor to the Garden of God. The similitude is found, not merely in its present pure and virgin character, but in its actual geographical
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ergy of New England. Honorable senators who have been so swift with criticism and sarcasm might profit by their example. Perhaps the senator from South Carolina [Mr. Butler], who is not insensible to scholarship, might learn from them something of its graces. Perhaps the senator from Virginia [Mr. Mason], who finds no sanction under the constitution for any remonstrance from clergymen, might learn from them something of the privileges of an American citizen. And perhaps the senator from Illinois [Mr. Douglas], who precipitated this odious measure upon the country, might learn from them something of political wisdom. Sir, from the first settlement of these shores, from those early days of struggle and privation, through the trials of the Revolution, the clergy have been associated, not only with the piety and the learning, but with the liberties, of the country. For a long time New England was governed by their prayers more than by any acts of the legislature; and, at a later day,
Finger Point (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
he Pilgrim Fathers, Mr. Sumner always referred to them with pleasure, as the grand leaders in the cause of civil and political freedom. In a speech at the festival held in Plymouth on the 1st of August, 1853, commemorating the embarkation of the fathers, he most eloquently eulogizes these invincible defenders of a cherished principle and a lofty faith. In reference to its covert bearing on the prominent question of the day (for he could not then speak openly), he entitled this address a Finger-point from Plymouth rock. He concluded it in this eloquent and suggestive strain:-- These outcasts, despised in their own day by the proud and great, are the men whom we have met in this goodly number to celebrate; not for any victory of war, not for any triumph of discovery, science, learning, or eloquence; not for worldly success of any kind. How poor are all these things by the side of that divine virtue which made them, amidst the reproach, the obloquy, and the hardness of the world,
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ms be, Launch our ‘Mayflower,’ and steer boldly through the desperate winter sea. But a battle was impending. Encouraged by the timid servility of the Northern Congressmen, the advocates of slavery brought forward, in the famous Nebraska and Kansas Bill, the iniquitous scheme of abrogating the Missouri Compromise of 1820, prohibiting slavery, that State alone excepted, from all the territory ceded by France to the United States, lying north of 36° 30′ north latitude. After various modificassional prohibition. Everywhere within the sphere of Congress, the great northern hammer will descend to smite the wrong; and the irresistible cry will break forth, No more slave States! Thus, sir, now standing at the very grave of freedom in Kansas and Nebraska, I lift myself to the vision of that happy resurrection by which freedom will be secured hereafter, not only in these Territories, but everywhere under the national government. More clearly than ever before, I now see the beginning
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
the work of John Gaillard and William Lowndes. I appeal to the senators from Maryland to uphold the compromise which elicited the constant support of Samuel Smith, and was first triumphantly pressed by the unsurpassed eloquence of Pinkney. I appeal to the senators from Delaware to maintain the landmark of freedom in the Territory of Louisiana, early espoused by Louis McLane. I appeal to the senators from Kentucky not to repudiate the pledges of Henry Clay. I appeal to the senators from Alabama not to break the agreement sanctioned by the earliest votes in the Senate of their late most cherished fellow-citizen William Rufus King. Sir, I have heard of an honor that felt a stain like a wound. If there be any such in this chamber,--as surely there is,--it will hesitate to take upon itself the stain of this transaction. In respect to the future of his cause he used this bold, prophetic language:-- I am not blind to the adverse signs; but this I see clearly: amidst all seeming
Plymouth Rock (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
1853. his speech on Military Affairs. on the basis of Representation. on the Bill of rights. a finger point from Plymouth rock. reply to Mr. Douglas. a day of trial. Landmark of freedom. importance of the question at issue. iniquity o the prominent question of the day (for he could not then speak openly), he entitled this address a Finger-point from Plymouth rock. He concluded it in this eloquent and suggestive strain:-- These outcasts, despised in their own day by the proge to the character of the Pilgrims (and I cannot suppose otherwise), then is it well for us to be here. Standing on Plymouth Rock, at their great anniversary, we cannot fail to be elevated by their example. We see clearly what it has done for theedom, than the halting politician forgetful of principle, with a senate at his heels. Such, sir, is the voice from Plymouth Rock, as it salutes my ears. Others may not hear it; but to me it comes in tones I cannot mistake. I catch its noble wor
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 10: Mr. Sumner's Tribute to Mr. Downing. his speech at Lowell. his speech respecting Armories. Mr. Sumner as a Correspondent. his Letters. the Pacific Railroad. Secret Sessions of the Senate. his election to Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, 1853. his speech on Military Affairs. on the basis of Representation. on the Bill of rights. a finger point from Plymouth rock. reply to Mr. Douglas. a day of trial. Landmark of freedom. importance of the quesis country, he has earned, it seems to me, this small appropriation, not as a charity to this desolate widow, but as a compensation for labor done. I hope the amendment will be agreed to. At the State Convention of the Free-soil party held in Lowell on the 15th of September following, Mr. Sumner was received with demonstrations of the heartiest enthusiasm, and delivered a thrilling speech on the necessity and practicability of that organization. Capt. Drayton, the hero of The Pearl, who, t
Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e Senate Feb. 23, 1853, in favor of appointing civil instead of military superintendence of our armories, he closed, contrary to his usual custom, with a humorous quotation which gave much point to his fine argument. The manufacture of arms, said he, is a mechanical pursuit; and for myself, I can see no reason why it should not be placed in charge of one bred to the business. Among the intelligent mechanics of Massachusetts, there are many fully fit to be at the head of the arsenal at Springfield; but all these by the existing law are austerely excluded from any such trust. The idea which has fallen from so many senators, that the superintendent of an armory ought to be a military man, that a military man only is competent, or even that a military man is more competent than a civilian, seems to me as illogical as the jocular fallacy of Dr. Johnson, that He who drives fat oxen must himself be fat. Mr. Sumner was an admirable correspondent. He wrote his letters with rapidity, e
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
from Virginia to keep inviolate the compact made in their behalf by James Barbour and Charles Fenton Mercer. I appeal to the senators from South Carolina to guard the work of John Gaillard and William Lowndes. I appeal to the senators from Maryland to uphold the compromise which elicited the constant support of Samuel Smith, and was first triumphantly pressed by the unsurpassed eloquence of Pinkney. I appeal to the senators from Delaware to maintain the landmark of freedom in the Territory of Louisiana, early espoused by Louis McLane. I appeal to the senators from Kentucky not to repudiate the pledges of Henry Clay. I appeal to the senators from Alabama not to break the agreement sanctioned by the earliest votes in the Senate of their late most cherished fellow-citizen William Rufus King. Sir, I have heard of an honor that felt a stain like a wound. If there be any such in this chamber,--as surely there is,--it will hesitate to take upon itself the stain of this transaction.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
appeal on behalf of the Missouri Compromise:-- The Missouri compact, in its unperformed obligations to freedom, stands at this day as impregnable as the Louisiana purchase. I appeal to senators about me not to disturb it. I appeal to the senators from Virginia to keep inviolate the compact made in their behalf by James Barbour and Charles Fenton Mercer. I appeal to the senators from South Carolina to guard the work of John Gaillard and William Lowndes. I appeal to the senators from Maryland to uphold the compromise which elicited the constant support of Samuel Smith, and was first triumphantly pressed by the unsurpassed eloquence of Pinkney. I appeal to the senators from Delaware to maintain the landmark of freedom in the Territory of Louisiana, early espoused by Louis McLane. I appeal to the senators from Kentucky not to repudiate the pledges of Henry Clay. I appeal to the senators from Alabama not to break the agreement sanctioned by the earliest votes in the Senate of th
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