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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Democratic party will have no pudding-stick with which to stir the bubbling mass. The bill for the amendment, however, prevailed; and the African race was thus constitutionally restored to the political privileges of American citizenship. To the achievement of this grand result, no one contributed more of eloquence, statesmanship, or personal effort than Charles Sumner; and by the liberated millions no name on earth is more revered. If others forget thee, said Robert B. Elliott of South Carolina, thy fame shall be guarded by the millions of that emancipated race whose gratitude shall be more enduring than the monumental marble. By Mr. Sumner's remarkable speech early in 1869, on The Alabama claims, which he undoubtedly over-estimated, and which led to the rejection by the Senate of the Clarendon-Johnson treaty, he somewhat endangered our friendly relations with England, and was severely criticised by the English press; yet his design was not so much to obtain heavy damages, as
Caribbean Sea (search for this): chapter 17
id he, it is plain that the navy of the United States, acting under orders from Washington, has been engaged in measures of violence, and of belligerent intervention, being war without the authority of Congress. An act of war without the authority of Congress is no common event. This is the simplest statement of the case. The whole business is aggravated when it is considered that the declared object of this violence is the acquisition of foreign territory, being half an island in the Caribbean Sea; and, still further, that this violence has been employed, first, to prop and maintain a weak ruler, himself a usurper, upholding him in power that he might sell his country; and, secondly, it has been employed to menace the Black Republic of Hayti. He denounced Baez as a usurper who would sell his country, and said that the treaty was a violation of the Constitution of the United States, as well as of that of San Domingo. On the ensuing day Mr. Howe replied to Mr. Sumner, defending
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ion between the insurgents and the Spanish government; but his most remarkable effort was in opposition to the president's Dominican treaty. Mr. Sumner no doubt honestly believed that the scheme of annexing the Republic of San Domingo to the United States was advocated by the administration and its supporters, not for the benefit of the people of that island, but for the enrichment of certain speculators; and he most frankly, perhaps too sharply, avowed his opinions on the subject. During ther held in higher consideration by foreign courts. But he and the president were at variance. On the 27th of March, 1871, he again spoke on the San-Domingo treaty. On evidence before the Senate, said he, it is plain that the navy of the United States, acting under orders from Washington, has been engaged in measures of violence, and of belligerent intervention, being war without the authority of Congress. An act of war without the authority of Congress is no common event. This is the si
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): chapter 17
cial reconstruction. equal Suffrage. the Alabama claims. the Cubans. the Dominican treaty. rupture with Gen. Grant. displacement of Mr. Sumner. speech on San Domingo. The laws, the rights, The generous plan of power, delivered down From age to age by our renowned forefathers, So dearly bought, the price of so much blood,most remarkable effort was in opposition to the president's Dominican treaty. Mr. Sumner no doubt honestly believed that the scheme of annexing the Republic of San Domingo to the United States was advocated by the administration and its supporters, not for the benefit of the people of that island, but for the enrichment of certaindenounced Baez as a usurper who would sell his country, and said that the treaty was a violation of the Constitution of the United States, as well as of that of San Domingo. On the ensuing day Mr. Howe replied to Mr. Sumner, defending Baez; and he insinuated, in conclusion, that Mr. Sumner, Judaslike, was trying to stab the Republ
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
cal privileges of American citizenship. To the achievement of this grand result, no one contributed more of eloquence, statesmanship, or personal effort than Charles Sumner; and by the liberated millions no name on earth is more revered. If others forget thee, said Robert B. Elliott of South Carolina, thy fame shall be guarded by the millions of that emancipated race whose gratitude shall be more enduring than the monumental marble. By Mr. Sumner's remarkable speech early in 1869, on The Alabama claims, which he undoubtedly over-estimated, and which led to the rejection by the Senate of the Clarendon-Johnson treaty, he somewhat endangered our friendly relations with England, and was severely criticised by the English press; yet his design was not so much to obtain heavy damages, as to exhibit the wrong done by England in furnishing that vessel to the rebels, and also the underlying principles of international law, by which sovereign states in their intercourse with each other ought
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
of Boston. This alliance, owing to disparity of age and taste, was infelicitous; and a divorce was decreed May 10, 1873, by Judge Holt of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. By this circumstance the friendly relations between Mr. Sumner and the Hon. Samuel Hooper, father-in-law of Mrs. Sumner, were in no respect disturbed. In imputation rest upon your administration? Mr. Motley is one of the best known and most renowned of our countrymen. . . . I need not say that they (the men of Massachusetts) are surprised at the rumor that he is to be removed. They are pained to have it said that his removal is on account of Mr. Sumner's opposition to the San-Domingo treaty. His removal will be regarded by the Republicans of Massachusetts as a blow not only at him, but at Mr. Sumner. . . . I want to see the President and Congress in harmony, and the Republican party united and victorious. To accomplish this, we must all be just, charitable, and forgiving. Very truly, Henry Wilson.
the liberated millions no name on earth is more revered. If others forget thee, said Robert B. Elliott of South Carolina, thy fame shall be guarded by the millions of that emancipated race whose gratitude shall be more enduring than the monumental marble. By Mr. Sumner's remarkable speech early in 1869, on The Alabama claims, which he undoubtedly over-estimated, and which led to the rejection by the Senate of the Clarendon-Johnson treaty, he somewhat endangered our friendly relations with England, and was severely criticised by the English press; yet his design was not so much to obtain heavy damages, as to exhibit the wrong done by England in furnishing that vessel to the rebels, and also the underlying principles of international law, by which sovereign states in their intercourse with each other ought always to be guided. He subsequently used his influence in securing the consent of the Senate to the treaty of Washington, by which an award of less consideration was secured. I
Jonathan Mason (search for this): chapter 17
r the press, and in making preparations for the coming conflict in the re-establishment of order in the Southern States. On the twenty-seventh day of October he was united in marriage, by the Right Rev. Bishop Manton Eastburn, with Mrs. Alice (Mason) Hooper, the widow of Mr. William Sturgis Hooper, and daughter of Mr. Jonathan Mason of Boston. This alliance, owing to disparity of age and taste, was infelicitous; and a divorce was decreed May 10, 1873, by Judge Holt of the Supreme Court of MMr. Jonathan Mason of Boston. This alliance, owing to disparity of age and taste, was infelicitous; and a divorce was decreed May 10, 1873, by Judge Holt of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. By this circumstance the friendly relations between Mr. Sumner and the Hon. Samuel Hooper, father-in-law of Mrs. Sumner, were in no respect disturbed. In regard to naming children after great men, Mr. Sumner wrote this pleasant and sensible letter to a father in New York who proposed to call his son Charles Sumner:-- My dear----,--Don't make a mistake. Never name a child after a living man. This is the counsel I give always, and most sincerely. Who knows that I may not
Nellie Grant (search for this): chapter 17
t of the president. a letter to Mr. Stanton. Financial reconstruction. equal Suffrage. the Alabama claims. the Cubans. the Dominican treaty. rupture with Gen. Grant. displacement of Mr. Sumner. speech on San Domingo. The laws, the rights, The generous plan of power, delivered down From age to age by our renowned forefhe should not consider the work completed until he saw a colored member in the Senate. During the presidential campaign of this year he favored the election of Gen. Grant, although he believed a better nomination might have been made. On the 3d of February, 1869, he strongly advocated in the Senate the enactment of a law by Coso they had, undoubtedly, some influence on his intellectual temper. On account of the opposition to his annexation scheme, and perhaps for some other reasons, Gen. Grant, against the advice of many of his supporters, removed in 1870, from his place as minister to England, Mr. J. L. Motley, the historian, and an intimate friend o
Bishop Manton Eastburn (search for this): chapter 17
his services than she, and that he had better remain at Washington. He came, however, and stood beside her when she passed away. Returning from her grave, he bowed his head in the loneliness of sorrow, and exclaimed, I have now no home! The summer was spent in revising his speeches for the press, and in making preparations for the coming conflict in the re-establishment of order in the Southern States. On the twenty-seventh day of October he was united in marriage, by the Right Rev. Bishop Manton Eastburn, with Mrs. Alice (Mason) Hooper, the widow of Mr. William Sturgis Hooper, and daughter of Mr. Jonathan Mason of Boston. This alliance, owing to disparity of age and taste, was infelicitous; and a divorce was decreed May 10, 1873, by Judge Holt of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. By this circumstance the friendly relations between Mr. Sumner and the Hon. Samuel Hooper, father-in-law of Mrs. Sumner, were in no respect disturbed. In regard to naming children after great
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