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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865. Search the whole document.

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Manning, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ped at Mill Branch. April 8, the column moved over fair roads through a wooded country, with a bright sky overhead, our advance sighting the enemy now and then on the flanks and front. For four miles the course was westerly; then, in consequence of a false report that a bridge in front near Ox Swamp was burned, to the left five miles, on a road running toward the Santee. Then turning again to the right northwesterly until the road of the morning was again entered, it was pursued toward Manning. On the edge of that town our cavalry had a slight skirmish, driving out a small force. Manning, a town of a few hundred inhabitants, was occupied at dark, after an eighteen-mile march that day. General Potter established himself at Dr. Hagen's house. Major Culp, Twenty-fifth Ohio, Colonel Cooper, One Hundred and Seventh Ohio, and some soldierprinters took possession of The Clarendon Banner newspaper office, and changing the title to read The Clarendon Banner of Freedom, issued an editio
Kingville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Chapter 15: Potter's Raid. While at Columbia, S. C., General Sherman sent and destroyed the railroad to Kingsville and the Wateree Bridge. From Cheraw he broke the railroad trestles toward Florence as far as Darlington, and the enemy burned the railroad bridge over the Pedee. Between Florence and Sumterville was a vast amount of rollingstock thus hemmed in. Sherman, considering that this should be destroyed before the roads could be repaired, and that the food supplies in that section shtent were fired as a salute. Soon after, the march was resumed in sultry weather with frequent showers. Ten miles from the Santee the division bivouacked after completing a journey of twenty miles. On the 22d the troops continued on over the Santee road. When opposite Wright's Bluff, the wounded, sick, and about five hundred contrabands were sent to the river for transportation by water. News was received of Lee's surrender which, though not unexpected, caused great rejoicing. General P
Williamsburgh (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
rgeant Wilkins of Company D for this field service. April 5, at 8 A. M., Potter's force moved from Georgetown, the First Brigade in advance, over the centre or Sampit road for three miles, when the column took another to the right leading to Kingstree. Marching through a heavily timbered country and encountering no hostiles, the division compassed nineteen miles, camping at nightfall near Johnson's Swamp. Hallowell's brigade had the advance on the 6th, preceded by the cavalry, the close, walry encountered a few of the enemy's mounted men, who skirmished lightly, and toward evening exchanged shots with them at Seven-Mile Bridge on the right, which the foe burned. Camp was made at Thorntree Swamp after a nineteen-mile march, with Kingstree across the Black River, seven miles to our right. An early start was made on the 7th toward the northwest, through a more open and settled country, containing still more abundant supplies, which our foragers secured, but, by orders, burned a
Round Hill, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
h the right wing of the regiment, reconnoitred for two miles toward Statesburg, but found no enemy, and returned. Everything was ready for an early advance on the 15th, but it was not made until 3 P. M., when the Thirty-second United States Colored Troops having returned from Wright's Bluff, the division moved from Singleton's. It rained in the afternoon and evening. That morning the Twenty-fifth Ohio, ordered to Statesburg to await the division, encountered the enemy and drove them to Round Hill, where they made a stand, causing the Twenty-fifth some loss in repulsing them from there. Potter coming up with the main force, the One Hundred and Seventh Ohio was sent with six companies of the Twenty-fifth to engage the enemy as a demonstration, while the rest of the division, taking a road five miles from Singleton's, leading to the right, moved to flank the enemy collected on the main road. Potter marched until midnight, making twelve miles, and bivouacked near Jenning's Swamp and
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
al Gillmore from Fayetteville, N. C., directing him to execute this work. He suggested that Gillmore's force be twenty-five hundred men, lightly equipped, to move from Georgetown or the Santee Bridge, that the troops be taken from Charleston or Savannah, and added,— I don't feel disposed to be over-generous, and should not hesitate to burn Charleston, Savannah, and Wilmington, or either of them, if the garrisons were needed. . . . Those cars and locomotives should be destroyed if to do it cSavannah, and Wilmington, or either of them, if the garrisons were needed. . . . Those cars and locomotives should be destroyed if to do it costs you five hundred men. These instructions caused the concentration of a selected force at Georgetown, of which the Fifty-fourth formed a part. The resultant movement, called Potter's Raid, during which almost the last encounters of the Rebellion occurred, is little known, as it took place when momentous military events were taking place elsewhere. Georgetown was the port of one of the richest regions in the South, and until our vessels were stationed off its entrance, a resort of blo
Ox Swamp (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
any H, were the men wounded. When Lieutenant Rogers was disabled, Lieutenant Stevens took command of Company A, which he retained until his death. After a march of fifteen miles the Fifty-fourth camped at Mill Branch. April 8, the column moved over fair roads through a wooded country, with a bright sky overhead, our advance sighting the enemy now and then on the flanks and front. For four miles the course was westerly; then, in consequence of a false report that a bridge in front near Ox Swamp was burned, to the left five miles, on a road running toward the Santee. Then turning again to the right northwesterly until the road of the morning was again entered, it was pursued toward Manning. On the edge of that town our cavalry had a slight skirmish, driving out a small force. Manning, a town of a few hundred inhabitants, was occupied at dark, after an eighteen-mile march that day. General Potter established himself at Dr. Hagen's house. Major Culp, Twenty-fifth Ohio, Colonel Co
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
rough Manchester and Fulton Post-Office. Early that morning three companies of the One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops on picket were attacked by two hundred of the enemy, whom they repulsed. The column started at 6 A. M., the Second Brigade in advance, moving over the Santee River road southwesterly. Our rear-guard was the Twenty-fifth Ohio, the enemy following and attacking near Manning's plantation, but they were driven back. John L. Manning, a former governor of South Carolina, was at home. He was a distinguished man and one of the leaders of the Union party in nullification times. After the war he was elected United States Senator, but was not allowed to take his seat. He died only recently. While we were at his plantation, a Confederate officer came to the outposts with a flag of truce, to notify General Potter that an armistice had been concluded between Generals Sherman and Johnston. Hostilities were not to be renewed without forty-eight hours notice.
Eutaw Springs (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
toward Manchester about three miles, burning a long covered railroad-bridge, four cars, two hundred bales of cotton, a gin-house, and a mill filled with corn. Our regiment, from its bivouac in the town, sent details which destroyed three locomotives, fifteen cars, and the large and thoroughly equipped railroad machine-shop in the place. Gen. A. S. Hartwell with the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, Fifty-fourth New York, and two guns of the Third New York Artillery, from Charleston, reached Eutaw Springs on April 10, by way of Monk's Corner and Pineville, to co-operate with General Potter. An effort was made to open communication from there by Maj. William Nutt, Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, with two companies of his regiment, which was unsuccessful, for Potter was thirty miles distant. Hartwell's force returned to Charleston on the 12th, with over one thousand negroes and many wagons and draught animals. Potter resumed the march April 11, leaving the Twentyfifth Ohio as a covering for
Thorntree Swamp (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Johnson's Swamp. Hallowell's brigade had the advance on the 6th, preceded by the cavalry, the close, warm day causing some exhaustion and straggling. The column entered a better region with rolling ground, where foraging parties found good supplies and draught animals. Major Webster of the cavalry encountered a few of the enemy's mounted men, who skirmished lightly, and toward evening exchanged shots with them at Seven-Mile Bridge on the right, which the foe burned. Camp was made at Thorntree Swamp after a nineteen-mile march, with Kingstree across the Black River, seven miles to our right. An early start was made on the 7th toward the northwest, through a more open and settled country, containing still more abundant supplies, which our foragers secured, but, by orders, burned all cotton and mills. Light troops of the enemy, easily dislodged, kept in front of the column. Potter reached the Northeastern Railroad that day and broke the track for several miles, and the One Hundr
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
, General Sherman sent and destroyed the railroad to Kingsville and the Wateree Bridge. From Cheraw he broke the railroad trestles toward Florence as far as Darlington, and the enemy burned the railroad bridge over the Pedee. Between Florence and Sumterville was a vast amount of rollingstock thus hemmed in. Sherman, considering that this should be destroyed before the roads could be repaired, and that the food supplies in that section should be exhausted, wrote General Gillmore from Fayetteville, N. C., directing him to execute this work. He suggested that Gillmore's force be twenty-five hundred men, lightly equipped, to move from Georgetown or the Santee Bridge, that the troops be taken from Charleston or Savannah, and added,— I don't feel disposed to be over-generous, and should not hesitate to burn Charleston, Savannah, and Wilmington, or either of them, if the garrisons were needed. . . . Those cars and locomotives should be destroyed if to do it costs you five hundred men.
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