hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Aug 1,688 0 Browse Search
Mch Apl 1,040 0 Browse Search
Jly 1,001 1 Browse Search
Mch 851 1 Browse Search
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) 583 9 Browse Search
Jan Feb 500 0 Browse Search
Nov Dec 390 0 Browse Search
Nov 224 0 Browse Search
Sep 220 0 Browse Search
Garth W. James 203 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865. Search the whole document.

Found 343 total hits in 146 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
ined $13. After four hours of ludicrously unsuccessful trials on the part of a number of men, Butler of Company K secured the full pay and the trousers. Wheelbarrow and sack races closed the games. December came in, cold and rainy, for the winter weather had set in. The day, however, was a happy and memorable one, for news was received of General Grant's great victory at Missionary Ridge, and every fort fired a salute, causing spiteful replies from the enemy. A high wind prevailed on the 6th, and those who were upon the bluff or beach witnessed a terrible disaster to the fleet. At 2 P. M. the monitor Weehawken, off the island, foundered, carrying to their death, imprisoned below, four officers and twentyseven men. There was much heavy weather about the first ten days of December. After it subsided, the beach of Morris Island was strewn with logs some thirty feet long and eighteen inches through, a number of which were bolted together with iron. Others were found floating wi
ille was set on fire by our shells. Admiral Dahlgren having demanded the surrender of Sumter, which was refused, a night assault was determined upon jointly by the army and navy; but differences arose regarding the command. When the time came, Gillmore's force was detained in shallow waters by the tide. Commander T. H. Stevens, with eighteen officers and some four hundred sailors and marines, embarked in thirty boats for the enterprise. The leaders landed at Sumter after midnight on the 9th. Major Elliott was prepared for and received the assault with musketry and fragments of the epaulment. In a few minutes all was over, for the brave leaders, finding it impossible to scale the walls, were made prisoners. Our loss was ten officers and one hundred and four men captured and three men killed. As Forts Wagner and Gregg were ordered to be turned for offensive purposes, a covered way between these two works begun, and new batteries ordered to be constructed, there were heavy de
rking parties for the Bluff Battery in the southerly sand-hills near the beach-front. To retard our progress with the works at the front, the enemy maintained a constant cannonade. Batteries Simkins and Cheves were most active against us. On the 15th the enemy's magazine in the latter work was accidentally blown up with 1,200 pounds of powder, causing some casualties. The force of this explosion was felt all over Morris Island. Black Island, between Morris and James islands, where we had a balabor which is not shared by the white troops, but will receive in all respects the same treatment, and be allowed the same opportunities for drill and instruction. During the third week of November several events of interest occurred. On the 15th the Moultrie House on Sullivan's Island, which had long flown a hospital flag, was torn down, disclosing a powerful battery, which opened a terrible fire on us in unison with two other works. This, occurring at 10 P. M., it was thought might cove
boat attack, so our troops were called into line, where they remained until firing ceased. Meanwhile from Gregg and the Ironsides our calcium lights swept the waters about the harbor to discover any force approaching. Our monitor Lehigh grounded the next morning. Under a fierce cannonade a hawser was carried from the Nahant, and by it and the rising tide she was floated at 11 A. M. From Gregg and Chatfield our guns, mounted for the purpose, began to fire on the city at 10 A. M. on the 17th, throwing twenty-one shells. We could see the smoke from the explosions as the shells struck about the wharves, in the burnt district, or well up among the houses. This bombardment of Charleston was from this time maintained with more or less vigor each day and night. Against Sumter, from November 1 to the 20th, we fired an average of five hundred shots daily. Our new work nearest Gregg was named Battery Seymour, and was armed with ten-inch mortars; another still farther south was called
s the Fifty-fourth had more officers and men present toward the last of October than at any time after it left St. Helena Island. Our new and old works being in readiness at Cumming's Point, what General Gillmore calls the second bombardment of Sumter was begun October 26. Its purpose was to prevent guns being mounted there, and to cut down the southeast face, that the casemates of the channel face be taken in reverse. General Seymour had returned and assumed command of the island on the 18th. Under his direction our batteries opened from seven heavy rifles (including a three-hundred-pounder) in Wagner, and four in Gregg and from two mortars. Some fire was directed against Fort Johnson also, the enemy replying briskly. The next day the cannonade was renewed with one gun in Gregg turned upon the city. Our range against Sumter being less than was the case during Wagner's siege, rendered the force of our shot much greater. Sharpshooters in Sumter armed with the long-range Whitwo
ght of all others. This position, despite protest, was denied him by Maj. Michael Schmitt, Independent New York Battalion. When the tour of duty was completed, a report was made of the affair and forwarded to post headquarters. The discrimination did not occur again. By persistent and firm assertion of the rights of the men on the part of all the Fifty-fourth officers, a discontinuance of these and other discourtesies was at last obtained. There arrived from Long Island, Mass., on the 20th, some one hundred and twelve recruits for the regiment, which served to fill the ranks nearly to the maximum. With a single exception they were all volunteers. By this date the Fifty-fourth was well clothed, fully equipped, and prepared for any service. The colder weather, although it brought some discomfort, served to lessen the number of sick. Food was better and more varied. Quartermaster Ritchie, assisted by Sergeant Barquet and Private King, secured bricks from the old lighthouse an
nks nearly to the maximum. With a single exception they were all volunteers. By this date the Fifty-fourth was well clothed, fully equipped, and prepared for any service. The colder weather, although it brought some discomfort, served to lessen the number of sick. Food was better and more varied. Quartermaster Ritchie, assisted by Sergeant Barquet and Private King, secured bricks from the old lighthouse and constructed an oven which furnished soft bread. It had a capacity of two hundred loaves each baking. Troops had been moving from various posts to Hilton Head during January, and on the 27th our brigade was ordered to embark as soon as transportation was provided. During the afternoon of the 28th everything but the tents was loaded upon two steamers assigned to the Fifty-fourth. As darkness fell, camp was struck; but as the vessels could not leave until the next forenoon, the regiment through the early part of the night remained on shore, gathered about small camp-fires.
January 1st (search for this): chapter 7
lls injuring many firemen. Chatfield joined Gregg in the bombardment directed upon the fire. The enemy opened rapidly for a time and then gradually ceased, but our guns continued to fire with more or less vigor all day. On their part the Confederates prepared a Christmas surprise for the gunboat Marblehead lying in the Stono near Legareville. At 6 A. M. some pieces on John's Island, brought there at night, opened on the gunboat, but were soon driven away with loss of men and guns. New Year's Day being the first anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, the non-commissioned officers arranged for a celebration. The men formed and proceeded to the parade-ground, where a dry-goods box covered with a rubber blanket was placed, to serve as a speaker's stand. Chaplain Harrison offered a prayer and then introduced the orator of the day, Sergeant Barquet of Company H. Barquet was in high spirits, and began with the quotation, What means this sea of upturned faces, etc. The speaker
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 7
ease re-joined. Surgeon Stone went North, and was then appointed surgeon, United States Volunteers. Lieutenant Higginson was promoted while absent sick, and was afterward transferred to the Fifth Massachusetts Cavalry as captain. Lieutenant Johnston was discharged. A change in the line formation was necessary after these promotions, which was ordered as follows, Company D being on the left:— D B A E H F K C G I Greek fire was used from our city guns experimentally in twenty shells on January 3. Previous firings with this compound had not been satisfactory in result. The charges on this day seemed more effective, apparently causing a fire in Charleston. It is stated on Confederate authority that the whole number of our shells fired into the city from August 21 to January 5 was 472, of which twenty-eight fell short. They are said to have killed five persons. Our opening thereupon from Cumming's Point was the occasion of great dismay and confusion. A hegira to the country too
January 5th (search for this): chapter 7
ne formation was necessary after these promotions, which was ordered as follows, Company D being on the left:— D B A E H F K C G I Greek fire was used from our city guns experimentally in twenty shells on January 3. Previous firings with this compound had not been satisfactory in result. The charges on this day seemed more effective, apparently causing a fire in Charleston. It is stated on Confederate authority that the whole number of our shells fired into the city from August 21 to January 5 was 472, of which twenty-eight fell short. They are said to have killed five persons. Our opening thereupon from Cumming's Point was the occasion of great dismay and confusion. A hegira to the country took place, by railroad and every kind of vehicle laden with household effects. Those who remained became somewhat accustomed to our shelling. The collection of old iron after each explosion was a regular business. Non-exploded shells were purchased by the authorities. From the Battery
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...