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China (China) (search for this): chapter 12
m it proper to speak briefly of the services rendered to our soldiers and to the Union cause by two ladies of Boston, who, during the entire war, devoted almost their whole time to works of charity and love, for the comfort of our soldiers, and the alleviation of their sufferings; one of whom was Mrs. Harrison Gray Otis, and the other Miss Abby W. May. Mrs. Harrison Gray Otis was the daughter of a Boston merchant, William H. Boardman, Esq., who was largely engaged in the North-west Coast, China, and India trade. She was early married to the eldest son of the Hon. Harrison Gray Otis, who bore his father's name. Upon the death of her husband, she passed seven years in Europe, for the purpose of educating her three sons, and returned to America, making Boston her permanent home. Connected by blood and marriage with some of the oldest and most distinguished families in the country, blessed with personal attractions, mental gifts, and a magnetism that drew about her the good as we
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ator from Kansas, and George B. Loring, of Salem. Letters were also read from Governor Andrew, Alexander H. Bullock of Worcester, Charles G. Loring, Alexander H. Rice and Samuel Hooper of Boston, and Benjamin F. Butler of Lowell. The letter of G and crowned by the happiness of having served the State with singleness of heart. The Republican Convention met in Worcester on the 15th of September, and organized by the choice of Mr. Gillett, of Westfield, for temporary chairman, who, on takpresidents and secretaries, among whom were several of the representative men of the party. Alexander H. Bullock, of Worcester, was unanimously nominated for Governor, and William Claflin, of Newton, for Lieutenant-Governor. Henry S. Briggs, of Pported by William S. Robinson, of Malden, chairman of the Committee on Resolutions. The Democratic Convention met in Worcester, on the 29th of September. John K. Tarbox was chosen temporary chairman, and Edward Avery, of Braintree, permanent pres
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
he Rebel States, at which Theophilus Parsons, Professor in Cambridge Law School, presided; and speeches were made by Mr. Parsons, Richard H. Dana, Jr., Henry Ward Beecher, S. C. Pomeroy, United States Senator from Kansas, and George B. Loring, of Salem. Letters were also read from Governor Andrew, Alexander H. Bullock of Worcester, Charles G. Loring, Alexander H. Rice and Samuel Hooper of Boston, and Benjamin F. Butler of Lowell. The letter of Governor Andrew, which contained the views he tnd efficient officer in the war, was nominated for Governor, and Thomas F. Plunkett, of Pittsfield, for Lieutenant-Governor; S. O. Lamb, of Greenfield, for Secretary of State; Thomas C. Amory, Jr., of Boston, for Treasurer; Arthur F. Devereux, of Salem, for Auditor; and Horatio G. Parker, of Cambridge, for Attorney-General. The election took place on Tuesday, the 7th of November, and resulted in a complete triumph of the Republican party; electing their State ticket by a large plurality, and
Pittsfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
sidents and secretaries, among whom were several of the representative men of the party. Alexander H. Bullock, of Worcester, was unanimously nominated for Governor, and William Claflin, of Newton, for Lieutenant-Governor. Henry S. Briggs, of Pittsfield, was nominated for Auditor; Jacob H. Loud, of Plymouth, for Treasurer; Chester I. Reed, of Taunton, for Attorney-General; and Oliver Warner, of Northampton, for Secretary of State. In the afternoon, speeches were made by Hon. Charles Sumner,and wellex-pressed addresses upon political affairs from a Democratic stand-point. Darius N. Couch, of Taunton, who had distinguished himself as an able and efficient officer in the war, was nominated for Governor, and Thomas F. Plunkett, of Pittsfield, for Lieutenant-Governor; S. O. Lamb, of Greenfield, for Secretary of State; Thomas C. Amory, Jr., of Boston, for Treasurer; Arthur F. Devereux, of Salem, for Auditor; and Horatio G. Parker, of Cambridge, for Attorney-General. The election t
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ebels gathered in the Canadas. The battalion was completed and mustered in on the 2d of January, 1865; and Colonel Burr Porter, formerly in command of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry, was appointed major. Two battalions were raised in the State of New York, to which the Massachusetts battalion was attached; and the three battalions were known as and designated the Twenty-sixth Regiment, New-York Volunteer Cavalry. They were mustered in for one year's service. So eager were our young men to select a suitable location for its uses. The proprietors of the Astor House tendered to this association the gratuitous use of a room or rooms in their hotel for its meetings at any time they might desire to make such use of them. The State of New York threw open the Park Barracks on Broadway as a temporary receiving hospital, and the southern portion of it was at once fitted up for that purpose. The Association of Physicians and Surgeons of New York and Brooklyn were appointed to take
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ng to recruit men in Savannah ahead of the United States; and this was made the ground for repealin, and was a captain in the Eleventh Infantry, U. S.A., and had risen from that position, by his braa, Jr., Henry Ward Beecher, S. C. Pomeroy, United States Senator from Kansas, and George B. Loring,ecial commemoration. The President of the United States and his Cabinet were invited to be presentes the present aspect of political affairs in America; from which we make an extract:— At thid citizens ever assembled on the continent of America. Among the good people of Richmond, Va., wreedmen. Although the Government of the United States ought to serve out rations, and to protectrmy of the United States from the interior of America to the shores of the Atlantic,— It gives of educating her three sons, and returned to America, making Boston her permanent home. Connected by Massachusetts for the service of the United States during the war, of all arms, and including[4 more...]<
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
proofs of hearty good-will, that could never be misunderstood. The name of the association would indicate, that it covered the six New-England States, and so, in a certain way, it did; but it was plain that to bring supplies northward from Rhode Island and Connecticut would be unwise; and, consequently, those two States forwarded their goods to New York, except on a few occasions, when shipment by sea to some remote Southern ports was more cheaply effected from Boston than from New York. Ths armies, 34,383 men, bearing upon their standards the names of those memorable battle-fields upon which they had won such immortal renown. This does not include the regiments which passed through the city from the States of Connecticut and Rhode Island; the care, reception, and entertainment of which devolved upon their energetic and able military agent, Colonel John H. Almy, whose entire time was industriously devoted to their interests, and whose services were of infinite value to the asso
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
the pastor, Rev. J. B. Miles. Then there was singing and prayer, addresses by the clergymen, and by the Mayor and others. At the conclusion, a collection was taken up for the benefit of the Christian Commission, and a large sum realized. In Roxbury, the State Guards, Captain Edward Wyman, with a band, marched in the evening through the principal streets, accompanied by a large body of citizens. In Elliott Square there was a grand display of fireworks. The Norfolk House and many dwellingsections from the Scriptures; prayer was made by Rev. Phillips Brooks, of Philadelphia; after which, a hymn written by Robert Lowell was sung by the congregation, to the tune of Old Hundred. This was followed by an address by Rev. Dr. Putnam, of Roxbury, of transcendent eloquence and beauty. After the services in the church, a procession moved to the large pavilion erected on the lawn in the rear of Harvard Hall, where an elegant and substantial dinner was provided. The scene in the pavilio
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
eans and men, for the national defence. The magnitude of the Rebellion, and the firm determination of the people of Massachusetts to suppress it, had absorbed all other questions, and obliterated from the public mind all minor issues. On the 3d of April, Governor Andrew received the following telegram from Secretary Stanton:— The following telegram from the President announcing the evacuation of Petersburg, and probably of Richmond, has just been received by this Department: City Point, Virginia, April 3d, 8.30, A. M.— This morning General Grant reports Petersburg evacuated, and he is confident Richmond also is. He is pushing forward to cut off, if possible, the retreating army. A. Lincoln. Later.—It appears by the despatch of General Weitzell, just received by the Department, that our forces under his command are in Richmond, having taken it at 8.35 this morning. Edwin M. Stanton. Immediately upon the receipt of this important and gratifying information, the Govern<
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
e extraordinary and brilliant exploits of the army commanded by Major-General Sherman, whose march through the States of Georgia, South Carolina, and far into the State of North Carolina, while it swept, by its resistless energy, the cities of Savan state prisoner at Fort Warren, and that he was shortly afterwards released from confinement, and permitted to return to Georgia. We will add, in this connection, that the writer had known Mr. Stephens when he was a member of Congress; and, while a Union cause, believed it would be wise and also expedient to have Mr. Stephens released from confinement, and return to Georgia, to exercise his personal influence to bring about a kind and loyal feeling to the Government in the South. It is just,s in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas; and had been unfurled where Burnside and Sherman had led in the Carolinas and in Georgia,—a sight was presented which awakened the most patriotic and sublime thoughts in the heart of every loyal person. As
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