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Saltillo (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 108
and train was moved into the swamp without any attempt being made by pioneers to render the crossing better, and before all of the train had made the passage the clearing through which the road ran was so badly cut up as to render a recross-age impossible. Two hours work would have sufficed to construct a road upon which the artillery and train could have been recrossed with ease. At ten o'clock, A. M., twenty-three miles from Ripley, about eighteen miles from Tupelo, and six miles from Saltillo, at the cross-roads at Brice's plantation, half a mile east of a deep creek, passable only by a bridge, and while the train was but in part across the Hatchie swamp, the advance encountered the enemy, which it immediately engaged. At twelve o'clock the Second brigade of cavalry moved into position, half a mile in advance of the point of intersection of the Fulton and Pontotoc road, defending this position. The engagement had now assumed a general character, the enemy apparently in great
Ellistown (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 108
ll day. Progress very slow. Marched thirteen miles, and made headquarters at Widow Childers', at intersection of the Saulsbury and Ripley and the Ruckersville and the Salem roads. Cavalry moved to Ruckersville. The advance guard of the infantry encountered a small party of rebels about noon, and chased them toward Ripley, on the LaGrange and Ripley road. Tuesday, June 7.--Upon information received from General Grierson that there was no enemy near Corinth, directed him to move toward Ellistown, on the direct road from Ripley, and instruct Colonel Karge to join him by way of Blackland and Carrollsville. Infantry moved to Ripley, and cavalry encamped on New Albany road, two miles south. Encountered a small party of rebels near Widow Childers', and drove them toward Ripley. In Ripley met an advance of the enemy and drove them on the New Albany road. Cavalry encountered about a regiment of rebel cavalry on that road and drove them south. Several showers during the afternoon, an
Moscow, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 108
lying down without your supper, upon a blanket if you had one, and upon the ground if you hadn't. At dawn of day, having been perfectly refreshed by a hard shower, we started off on our march, without surgeon's call, and without breakfast. At Moscow, we crossed Wolf river where it divides into two branches, making an island. The branch nearest us was bridged; we passed over it to the island and pulled it up after us — the bridge, not the branch — in order that we might bridge the other. Th admit that both horse and rider were distanced this time. I am, dear sir, Very truly yours, L. Dyer, Surgeon Eighty-first Illinois. Colonel McMillen's letter. headquarters, First brigade, First division, Sixteenth Army corps, Moscow, Tenn., June 24, 1864. General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the twenty-second instant, requesting me to give you a statement in writing, setting forth my views of the causes of our defeat at Brice's cross-
Ripley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 108
y of rebels about noon, and chased them toward Ripley, on the LaGrange and Ripley road. Tuesday, ls near Widow Childers', and drove them toward Ripley. In Ripley met an advance of the enemy and drRipley met an advance of the enemy and drove them on the New Albany road. Cavalry encountered about a regiment of rebel cavalry on that roadme road. Colonel Waring's brigade remained in Ripley awaiting the return of Colonel Karge, who joinurposely omitted the details of our march from Ripley to White's Station, as they would extend it to kindest treatment. We had not long been at Ripley before the pursuing column was upon us. Our casponsibility of turning back the expedition at Ripley, you would have avoided the disaster of the bancamped together at Stubbs' plantation, on the Ripley road. At 5:30 o'clock A. M., Colonel Waring'sand then take the rear of the column as far as Ripley, saying that at that point or just beyond he wavalry. The column then moved slowly toward Ripley, at which place it was fiercely attacked by th[12 more...]
Fulton, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 108
ge was on an island in the Hatchie River, and sent him five hundred men and two howitzers for reinforcements. Winslow's brigade of cavalry moved six miles on the Fulton road. Infantry and train moved five miles on same road. Colonel Waring's brigade remained in Ripley awaiting the return of Colonel Karge, who joined him at fivets and undoubted efficiency, encamped together at Stubbs' plantation, on the Ripley road. At 5:30 o'clock A. M., Colonel Waring's brigade took the advance on the Fulton road, Winslow's brigade following, the infantry and trains marching behind. Two miles beyond Stubbs' the army crossed a swamp, known as the Hatchie River, covere, which it immediately engaged. At twelve o'clock the Second brigade of cavalry moved into position, half a mile in advance of the point of intersection of the Fulton and Pontotoc road, defending this position. The engagement had now assumed a general character, the enemy apparently in great force, pressing with vigor upon the
Guntown (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 108
twenty-three miles from Ripley, and six miles from Guntown. * * * * * * * * At Ripley it became a serious de the infantry on its arrival, on its march toward Guntown, and with the remainder of his force to drive the eommanding a brigade and occupying a position on the Guntown road, a little in advance of the cross-roads, was eate retreat of General Sturgis' command from Guntown, Mississippi, to Memphis. I am taking notes and sketchesheard of our defeat under General Sturgis at Guntown, Mississippi, the other day. I wish I could give you someiency of arms among them, having left their guns at Guntown. This rapidly-moving army of living creatures, ce rebel Forrest, at Brice's crossroads, near Guntown, Mississippi, I, an eyewitness and participator in the en back, until they arrived within about two miles of Guntown, when their defence became more obstinate, and our cy in repelling the enemy while on the retreat from Guntown. As a general thing the colored soldiers retained
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 108
far as I know, discretionary powers, and you went on to meet the disaster your better judgment told you was imminent should we encounter an enemy in force beyond Ripley. As to the slanderous charges with which the country is being flooded concerning you personally, they are simply false, and beneath your notice or mine. W. L. Mcmillen, Colonel Ninety-fifth Ohio Infantry, commanding. To Brigadier-General S. D. Sturgis, U. S. V. William C. Ravalle, Captain, Aide-de-Camp, and A. A. A. G., U. S. A. Colonel Waring's letter. headquarters First brigade, cavalry division, Sixteenth Army corps, White Station, Tennessee, June 23, 1864. Brigadier-General S. D. Sturgis: General: I have received your letter of this date, asking me to state my opinion of the manner in which you conducted yourself in the recent expedition into Mississippi, and of the extent to which the failure of that expedition is to be attributed to your fault. In reply, I beg to state, that while I was not inf
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 108
viz.: to proceed to Corinth, Mississippi, by way of Salem and Ruckersville, capture any force that might be ththe cavalry to move to within three or four miles of Salem. Infantry marched to Lamar, eighteen miles from Lafle circumstances, could only make a few miles beyond Salem, and to regulate his march accordingly. Train arrivquarters to Widow Spight's house, two miles west of Salem, and Colonel Hoge's brigade of infantry to Robinson's house, four miles from Salem (west). Sunday, June 5.--Infantry and train started at half-past 4 A. M., and joined the cavalry, two miles east of Salem, at 10 A. M.; issued rations to the cavalry, and fed the forage che Saulsbury and Ripley and the Ruckersville and the Salem roads. Cavalry moved to Ruckersville. The advance en o'clock the column was again put in motion on the Salem road, the cavalry in advance, followed by infantry. ut checking the rebel advance, it retreated down the Salem road. The column was then moved out of Ripley, an
Baldwin, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 108
ountered a portion of the enemy's cavalry. In a few minutes more I received another message from him, saying the enemy numbered some six hundred, and were on the Baldwin road; that he was (himself) at Brice's cross-roads, and that his position was a good one, and he would hold it. He was then directed to leave six hundred or sevenhundred men at the cross-roads, to precede the infantry on its arrival, on its march toward Guntown, and with the remainder of his force to drive the enemy toward Baldwin, and then rejoin the main body by way of the line of the railroad, as I did not intend being drawn from my main purpose, Colonel McMillen arrived at this time, ann here it seemed doubtful that we would meet with serious opposition. It became necessary to send out patrols to procure fuller information. The patrol toward Baldwin almost immediately struck a strong picket of the enemy, and was reinforced before the numbers opposed to us could be known. We were engaged by a force which I th
Wolf (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 108
night, and rest ourselves and animals; and on arriving at a place three miles west of LaGrange, at one o'clock at night, having travelled over all the by-roads and cow-paths in the country, we went into camp. This consisted in lying down without your supper, upon a blanket if you had one, and upon the ground if you hadn't. At dawn of day, having been perfectly refreshed by a hard shower, we started off on our march, without surgeon's call, and without breakfast. At Moscow, we crossed Wolf river where it divides into two branches, making an island. The branch nearest us was bridged; we passed over it to the island and pulled it up after us — the bridge, not the branch — in order that we might bridge the other. This was abetter philosophy than the Irishman's, whose blanket being too short at the bottom, lengthened it with a piece cut from the top. It was now nine o'clock A. M., and we still had twenty-four miles to make before reaching our lines at Collierville. But we were enco
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