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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Cross Roads (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 113
Vicksburg, Miss., July 13. I send a brief description of the expedition to Jackson, Mississippi, which left this city on the morning of the first instant, and returned on the evening of the ninth instant, under command of Brigadier-General E. S. Dennis, commander of the First division of the Seventeenth Army Corps, and a complete list of the losses in diffierent companies during the engagement on the morning of the seventh instant, at a point some three miles west of Jackson, known as Cross-roads, or rather where the Canton road intersects the main Jackson road. On the evening of June thirtieth, orders were received at the headquarters of the different regiments composing the force to make the necessary arrangements for a move the next morning at two o'clock; and when the specified time arrived, everything was in readiness, and a start effected. Although the day was exceedingly warm and dusty, we marched to Big Black river, where we went in camp for the night, with the expecta
Clinton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 113
ts and the protection of their old emblem and protector, the Stars and Stripes, under which they have won many hard-fought battles. Here we went into camp, to spend another night under the grand canopy of Heaven. Next morning we moved by the break of day, and made fine progress, it having rained the night previous, which tended to recreate and enliven our little army, as it had been very warm and dusty the preceding three days; and at two o'clock P. M. we were encamped in the suburbs of Clinton, a small town on the Vicksburg and Jackson railroad. Here we had made ample arrangements for doing our rations justice, when the advance, a detachment of cavalry, was attacked, and a general move was the result. Eatables of every description, which had been served in the most luxuriant style, were put aside, and a line of battle formed, but to no avail, as the enemy retreated upon our making arrangements to meet them; consequently we retired, spending the balance of our hours of rest in p
Big Black (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 113
, at a point some three miles west of Jackson, known as Cross-roads, or rather where the Canton road intersects the main Jackson road. On the evening of June thirtieth, orders were received at the headquarters of the different regiments composing the force to make the necessary arrangements for a move the next morning at two o'clock; and when the specified time arrived, everything was in readiness, and a start effected. Although the day was exceedingly warm and dusty, we marched to Big Black river, where we went in camp for the night, with the expectation of resuming our journey at an early hour next morning; but not so. Morning came, but no orders, in consequence of which we lay in camp all day and the second night, our delay being to await the construction of the pontoon bridge over the river, and to attend to the drawing of rations and forage; but early on the morning of the third instant we took our position in ranks, and marched, slowly on until we arrived at Champion Hil
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 113
Doc. 35. General Dennis' expedition. headquarters Seventy-Sixth Illinois Volunteer infantry, Vicksburg, Miss., July 13. I send a brief description of the expedition to Jackson, Mississippi, which left this city on the morning of the first instant, and returned on the evening of the ninth instant, under command of Brigadier-General E. S. Dennis, commander of the First division of the Seventeenth Army Corps, and a complete list of the losses in diffierent companies during the engagement on the morning of the seventh instant, at a point some three miles west of Jackson, known as Cross-roads, or rather where the Canton road intersects the main Jackson road. On the evening of June thirtieth, orders were received at the headquarters of the different regiments composing the force to make the necessary arrangements for a move the next morning at two o'clock; and when the specified time arrived, everything was in readiness, and a start effected. Although the day was exceedingly
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 113
r infantry, Vicksburg, Miss., July 13. I send a brief description of the expedition to Jackson, Mississippi, which left this city on the morning of the first instant, and returned on the evening ofring the engagement on the morning of the seventh instant, at a point some three miles west of Jackson, known as Cross-roads, or rather where the Canton road intersects the main Jackson road. On ond brigade, First division, would effect a flank movement on them. Previous to our entering Jackson a flag of truce was sent out by the citizens with a request that we should not shell the city, t of the enemy's, thereby gaining advantages in other sources and by destroying a bridge over Pearl River, at Jackson, which was partially completed. Still, the general supposition is that it was noJackson, which was partially completed. Still, the general supposition is that it was not the intention of General Dennis to engage the enemy as he did, knowing their forces outnumbered ours, having some three thousand five hundred cavalry and mounted infantry, while our entire force of
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 113
position is that it was not the intention of General Dennis to engage the enemy as he did, knowing their forces outnumbered ours, having some three thousand five hundred cavalry and mounted infantry, while our entire force of effective men did not exceed two thousand, but to attract their attention so that our train could be put past danger. I must not close without speaking of our noble brigade commander, Colonel Dorublazer, Forty-sixth Illinois infantry, his staff, Colonel Busey, commanding seventy-sixth, and Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, commanding forty-sixth, who at all times were to be found with their commands in the discharge of their duties. Also to the minor officers of the brigade, who can be numbered only among the best, and as an honor to the service of the United States. Long may they survive among the roaring cannon and clashing of arms, is the prayer of many a noble heart under their commands, and may their heads be crowned with laurels ere this cruel war is over.
Bakers Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 113
n's Chicago battery, but were successfully repulsed on each occasion, with a comparatively small loss on our side, but heavy on the enemy's, the battery pouring a murderous fire of grape, canister, and shell into their ranks as they advanced, with the Eleventh Illinois infantry as a support, who at no time were idle. After this repulse we had no more serious trouble, but still an attack was hourly expected on the train, which at this time was perfectly safe. In this manner we reached Baker's Creek, about one and a half miles east of Champion Hills, where we camped for the night, after a hard day's work, the men and animals being completely fatigued and worn out, having been destitute of any food of importance for the past day, and the heat being very oppressive, in consequence of which there were several cases of sunstroke, one of which proved fatal. Time rolled on, and by four o'clock the next morning our noble little band could be seen wending their way in the direction of Bla
eace. Morning came, and we advanced as per orders, at seven o'clock, but proceeded only a short distance when this regiment was ordered to the rear, the train having been attacked by a squad of rebel cavalry, and for the remainder of the day we acted in the capacity of rear guard, but did not encounter any enemy, they having gone to their advance to support a battery which was operating against our front. After one o'clock the enemy fell back in the direction of Canton, learning that Colonel Coates' Second brigade, First division, would effect a flank movement on them. Previous to our entering Jackson a flag of truce was sent out by the citizens with a request that we should not shell the city, reporting no enemy there, so we marched through their once prosperous but now desolate capital, with banners flying, filling the air with the melodious sounds of martial music, amidst the prolonged cheers of the men, and arrived at the river on the southeast of the city, where we went in
Doc. 35. General Dennis' expedition. headquarters Seventy-Sixth Illinois Volunteer infantry, Vicksburg, Miss., July 13. I send a brief description of the expedition to Jackson, Mississippi, which left this city on the morning of the first instant, and returned on the evening of the ninth instant, under command of Brigadier-General E. S. Dennis, commander of the First division of the Seventeenth Army Corps, and a complete list of the losses in diffierent companies during the engagement on the morning of the seventh instant, at a point some three miles west of Jackson, known as Cross-roads, or rather where the Canton road intersects the main Jackson road. On the evening of June thirtieth, orders were received at the headquarters of the different regiments composing the force to make the necessary arrangements for a move the next morning at two o'clock; and when the specified time arrived, everything was in readiness, and a start effected. Although the day was exceedingly
l, the general supposition is that it was not the intention of General Dennis to engage the enemy as he did, knowing their forces outnumbered ours, having some three thousand five hundred cavalry and mounted infantry, while our entire force of effective men did not exceed two thousand, but to attract their attention so that our train could be put past danger. I must not close without speaking of our noble brigade commander, Colonel Dorublazer, Forty-sixth Illinois infantry, his staff, Colonel Busey, commanding seventy-sixth, and Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, commanding forty-sixth, who at all times were to be found with their commands in the discharge of their duties. Also to the minor officers of the brigade, who can be numbered only among the best, and as an honor to the service of the United States. Long may they survive among the roaring cannon and clashing of arms, is the prayer of many a noble heart under their commands, and may their heads be crowned with laurels ere this crue
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