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Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
eriously pressed, I sent for permission to advance more rapidly, leaving the train to be protected by the Third brigade. Permission having been obtained, I moved on the double-quick for about one mile, and reached Brice's house about half-past 1 o'clock, when the brigade was halted. Colonel McMillen then led the Ninety-fifth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Brombeck commanding, down the road leading past Brice's house toward Baldwin, and posted it on the left of the road and on the left of the----Illinois, about one fourth of a mile beyond Brice's house. I then returned with him to the brigade, and was directed to repair with the Seventy-second Ohio and the section of Captain Miller's Sixth Indiana battery to the knoll, on which stood a log house, about eight hundred yards in rear of Brice's house, and on the right as you go to Ripley. After the guns had been placed in position, and Captain----'s company of the Seventy-second Ohio had been thrown forward toward the woods in front, the bala
Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
Doc. 49. expedition to Tupelo, Mississippi General Mower's report. headquarters First division, Sixteenth Army corps, Memphis, Tennessee, July 27, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my division on the late expedition to Tupelo, Mississippi: I left La Grange on the morning of the fifth instant with my command, which was composed of the following brigades and batteries: First brigade, Colonel McMillen, Ninety-fifth Ohio volunteer infa— to you. I am, Captain, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Joseph A. Mower, Brigadier-General Commanding. Captain J. H Hough, Assistant Adjntant-General, Right Wing Sixteenth Army Corps. Colonel McMillen's report. Memphis, Tennessee, July 22, 1864. Captain: In obedience to orders, I moved with my command (the First brigade, First division, Sixteenth Army Corps) on the morning of the first instant to the depot of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, when the Ninth Mi
Ripley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
evening of the ninth we reached a point on the Ripley and Fulton road, fifteen or sixteen miles from. The whole column was then put in motion for Ripley. Upon reaching the crossing of the Hatchie th generally, to get it through. I arrived at Ripley, in company with the Genneral commanding, abouvance. Before the troops all left the town of Ripley the enemy made a furious attack upon the placecut off moved out on a road leading north from Ripley, and, under the brave and successful leadershind our left in order to reach the train on the Ripley road, I directed Captain Miller to throw a fewing the open field in our rear, and toward the Ripley road. Lieutenant-Colonel Eaton, commanding thine on the right of the road (as you go toward Ripley), and to contest the ground, if possible, untively on the right of the road as you go toward Ripley, and sent out skirmishers, who soon found the the opposite side of the stream. Arriving at Ripley at half-past 7 A. M., I waited for orders, but
Baldwin, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
hed the cross-roads between one and two P. M., and went into action at once on the right of the Baldwin road, relieving Colonel Waring's brigade of cavalry, which had been forced back to within a shoice's house. As fast as Colonel Hoge's regiment came up they were deployed on the right of the Baldwin road, extending the line in a semi-circular form in the direction of the Guntown road, relievinifth Ohio infantry in advance. This regiment was immediately placed in line on the left of the Baldwin road, with instructions to assist the regiments of Hoge's left in holding that road, and to govdvance to their original position, but failed, succeeding, however, in forming a line along the Baldwin road, and at right angles with it, parallel to the Fulton road, in which position I fought untih Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Brombeck commanding, down the road leading past Brice's house toward Baldwin, and posted it on the left of the road and on the left of the----Illinois, about one fourth of
Rossville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
h Army Corps. Colonel McMillen's report. Memphis, Tennessee, July 22, 1864. Captain: In obedience to orders, I moved with my command (the First brigade, First division, Sixteenth Army Corps) on the morning of the first instant to the depot of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, when the Ninth Minnesota infantry, which had been temporarily assigned, joined the brigade. The troops were embarked on the cars, the artillery and train going by road, the former reaching a point near La Fayette, when we encamped for the night. On the morning of the second instant, by order of Brigadier-General Sturgis, I was placed in command of all the infantry connected with the expedition, which was organized as follows: First brigade: Colonel Alexander Wilken, Ninth Minnesota infantry, commanding; Seventy-second Ohio infantry, veteran volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles G. Eaton, commanding; Ninety-fifth Ohio infantry volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Jefferson Brombeck, commanding; One H
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
the men had thrown away their arms during the retreat, and that those who had arms were short of ammunition. I was directed by General Sturgis to move out on the Salem road, in rear of the First brigade of cavalry, then in advance. Before the troops all left the town of Ripley the enemy made a furious attack upon the place, gainn took up the line of march. Hearing at the cross-roads, where I halted for an hour, that the enemy in force was falling upon a large detachment of our men on the Salem road, and that a large cavalry force was about three miles in our rear, and being almost out of ammunition, I concluded to follow the Salisbury road, and toward eving was joined by Captain Foster, Fifty-ninth regiment A. D., with about six hundred of his own and the Fifty-fifth regiment A. D., he having crossed over from the Salem road, which he considered unsafe. That night we bivouacked near Brooks', about five miles from Salisbury. The next morning at daylight we resumed the march, and
Davis Mills (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
ammunition, I concluded to follow the Salisbury road, and toward evening was joined by Captain Foster, Fifty-ninth regiment A. D., with about six hundred of his own and the Fifty-fifth regiment A. D., he having crossed over from the Salem road, which he considered unsafe. That night we bivouacked near Brooks', about five miles from Salisbury. The next morning at daylight we resumed the march, and after proceeding about three miles turned to the left, taking a settlement road leading to Davis' mills. Upon arriving at Davis', I found the bridge partially destroyed, and upon halting to repair it we were fired upon by a considerable number of the enemy, who were soon driven back, after wounding two of our men on the hill, and one of the flankers of the One Hundred and Fourteenth Illinois, and hitting the horse of Lieutenant-Colonel King, while passing the swamps beyond the bridge. Soon after, we were again attacked in front, but owing to the vigilance of the half-breed scouts of compa
Ellistown (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
fore; in fact it would have been useless to pursue mounted infantry with troops on foot under any circumstances. On the morning of the fifteenth, the enemy again appeared in our front. I awaited their attack, but finding that they were not disposed to approach within musket shot, with the exception of their skirmishers, I moved upon them and drove them about two miles, when they again took to their horses and fled. I then followed the third division, which had already moved out on the Ellistown road. A brigade of cavalry formed the rear guard. I arrived at the camp on Oldtown creek, and was there met by a staff officer of the General commanding the expedition, who directed that my division should pass by the Third and encamp in advance of them. Just as my rear brigade had crossed the creek, and passed through the bottom on the north side of it, several shells were suddenly dropped into the camp by the enemy, who, it seems, had driven in our cavalry the very moment the infant
Guntown (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
the Mobile and Ohio railroad, expecting to strike it at or in the vicinity of Guntown. I had proceeded some five miles with the head of the column, and halted to pldwin road, extending the line in a semi-circular form in the direction of the Guntown road, relieving the cavalry as they took position. As soon as the regiments tming next was placed on the right of Hoge's brigade completing the line to the Guntown road, and relieving the cavalry to that point. The Ninety third Indiana infantry, Colonel Thomas, was placed on the right of the Guntown road, over which it was very evident the enemy was then advancing to attack. The Seventy-second Ohio inf I directed Captain Fitch to put one section of his battery in position on the Guntown road and sweep it with grape and canister. Soon after our success on the righmmanded by myself, in the recent engagement at Brice's cross-roads, near Guntown, Mississippi, on the tenth instant. My brigade on that day marched in the rear of th
Salisbury, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 127
here I halted for an hour, that the enemy in force was falling upon a large detachment of our men on the Salem road, and that a large cavalry force was about three miles in our rear, and being almost out of ammunition, I concluded to follow the Salisbury road, and toward evening was joined by Captain Foster, Fifty-ninth regiment A. D., with about six hundred of his own and the Fifty-fifth regiment A. D., he having crossed over from the Salem road, which he considered unsafe. That night we bivouacked near Brooks', about five miles from Salisbury. The next morning at daylight we resumed the march, and after proceeding about three miles turned to the left, taking a settlement road leading to Davis' mills. Upon arriving at Davis', I found the bridge partially destroyed, and upon halting to repair it we were fired upon by a considerable number of the enemy, who were soon driven back, after wounding two of our men on the hill, and one of the flankers of the One Hundred and Fourteenth Il
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