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Reeves Point (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
ch was his intention he abandoned it after a skirmish with our pickets. During the day Brevet Brigadier-General H. L. Abbott, Chief of Artillery, was busily engaged in landing artillery and ammunition, so that if the assault failed, siege operations might at once be commenced. Consequent to the fall of Fisher, the enemy, during the nights of the sixteenth and seventeenth, blew up Fort Caswell, and abandoned both it and their very extensive works on Smith's island, at Smithville and Reeve's Point, thus placing in our hands all the works erected to defend the mouth of the Cape Fear river. In all the works were found one hundred and sixty-nine pieces of artillery, nearly all of which are heavy; over two thousand stands of small arms; considerable quantities of commissary stores, and full supplies of ammunition. Our prisoners numbered one hundred and twelve commissioned officers and one thousand nine hundred and seventy-one enlisted men. I have no words to do justice to the b
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
e afternoon of the fourth. One of them, the Atlantic, was of too heavy draught to come up the James; Curtis' brigade of Ames' division was therefore placed on river steamboats and sent down the river to be transferred to her. The embarkation of the remainder of the force commenced at sunset of the fourth and was completed at noon of the fifth instant; each vessel, as soon as it was loaded, was sent to Fort Monroe, and at nine o'clock P. M. of the fifth the whole fleet was collected in Hampton Roads. The troops were all in heavy marching order, with four days rations from the morning of the fourth in their haversacks, and forty rounds of ammunition in their boxes. No horses, wagons, or ambulances were taken; the caissons of the artillery were left behind, but in addition to the ammunition in the limber-chests, one hundred and fifty rounds per gun, in packing boxes, were embarked. I went down the river personally with the Lieutenant-General, and on the way received from him addi
Myrtle Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
sion, which it was supposed had been sent further south, was still here, and that it was his outposts which we were meeting. The first object which I had in view after landing was to throw a strong defensive line across the peninsula from the Cape Fear river to the sea, facing Wilmington, so as to protect our rear from attack while we should be engaged in operating against Fisher. Our maps indicated that a good position for such a line would be found a short distance above the head of Myrtle Sound, which is a long, shallow piece of water separated from the ocean by a sand-spit of about one hundred yards in width, and communicates with it by Masonboro Inlet. It was supposed that the right flank of a line at that point would be protected by the sound, and, being above its head, that we should by it control the beach as far up as the inlet, and thus, in case of need, be able to land supplies in quiet water there. Our landing place was selected with reference to this idea. An exam
Masonboro Inlet (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
hundred yards outside of them. The iron-clads moved down to within range of the fort and opened fire upon it. Another division was placed to the northward of the landing-place, so as to protect our men from any attack from the direction of Masonboro Inlet. At eight o'clock nearly two hundred boats, beside steamtugs, were sent from the navy to the transports, and the disembarkation of men, provisions, tools, and ammunition simultaneously commenced. At three o'clock P. M. nearly eight thous a good position for such a line would be found a short distance above the head of Myrtle Sound, which is a long, shallow piece of water separated from the ocean by a sand-spit of about one hundred yards in width, and communicates with it by Masonboro Inlet. It was supposed that the right flank of a line at that point would be protected by the sound, and, being above its head, that we should by it control the beach as far up as the inlet, and thus, in case of need, be able to land supplies i
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
to our success, and certainly nothing could surpass the perfect skill with which the fleet was handled by its commander. Every request which I made to Admiral Porter was most cheerfully complied with, and the utmost harmony has existed between us from the outset to the present time. I forward herewith General Ames' report. I have the honor to be, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Alfred H. Terry, Major-General. Brigadier-General J. A. Rawlins, Chief of Staff, City Point, Virginia. Brigadier-General Comstock's report. headquarters United States forces, Fort Fisher, North Carolina, January 27, 1865. sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of engineer operations in connection with the capture of Fort Fisher, together with a sketch of that work and another of the country in the vicinity. Fort Fisher is situated on the peninsula between the Cape Fear river and the Atlantic ocean, about a mile and a half north-east of Federal Point. For fi
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
iver, where the enemy, in case he should attack us, would be least exposed to the fire of the gunboats. Curtis' brigade of Ames' division was moved down toward Fisher during the morning, and at noon his skirmishers, after capturing on their way a small steamer which had come down the river with shells and forage for the garriso Brigadier-General J. A. Rawlins, Chief of Staff, City Point, Virginia. Brigadier-General Comstock's report. headquarters United States forces, Fort Fisher, North Carolina, January 27, 1865. sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of engineer operations in connection with the capture of Fort Fisher, togetheh was exploded, and whose dimensions are un known. C. B. C. Brigadier-General Ames' report. headquarters Second division, twenty-Fourth Army corps, Fort Fisher, N. C., January 16, 1865. Captain A. Terry, Assistant Adjutant-General: I have the honor to submit the following report of the late movements and operations of
Stuart (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
men and material for it might be at hand. These troops, under the command of Brevet Brigadier-General H. L. Abbott, were to follow me to Beaufort, North Carolina, and await orders. It was not until this time that I was informed that Fort Fisher was the point against which we were to operate. During the evening of the fifth orders were given for the transports to proceed to sea at four o'clock the next morning, and accompanying these orders were sealed letters, to be opened when off Cape Henry, directing them to rendezvous, in case of separation from the flag-ship, at a point twenty-five miles off Beaufort, North Carolina. The vessels sailed at the appointed hour. During the sixth instant a severe storm arose, which so much impeded our progress that it was not until the morning of the eighth that my own vessel arrived at the rendezvous; all the others excepting the flag-ship of General Paine were still behind. Leaving Brigadier-General Paine to assemble the other vessels as
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
llerists and a company of engineers, so that in case siege operations should become necessary the men and material for it might be at hand. These troops, under the command of Brevet Brigadier-General H. L. Abbott, were to follow me to Beaufort, North Carolina, and await orders. It was not until this time that I was informed that Fort Fisher was the point against which we were to operate. During the evening of the fifth orders were given for the transports to proceed to sea at four o'clock the next morning, and accompanying these orders were sealed letters, to be opened when off Cape Henry, directing them to rendezvous, in case of separation from the flag-ship, at a point twenty-five miles off Beaufort, North Carolina. The vessels sailed at the appointed hour. During the sixth instant a severe storm arose, which so much impeded our progress that it was not until the morning of the eighth that my own vessel arrived at the rendezvous; all the others excepting the flag-ship of G
New Inlet (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
rse by traverse, the work was won. Fort Fisher consists of two fronts — the first, or land-front, running across the peninsula at this point, seven hundred yards wide, is four hundred and eighty yards in length, while the second or sea-front runs from the right of the first parallel to the beach to the mound battery, a distance of thirteen hundred yards. The land-front is intended to resist any attack from the north, the sea-front to prevent any of our naval vessels from running through New Inlet or landing troops on Federal Point. 1. Land-Front.--This front consists of a half bastion on the left or Cape Fear river side, connected by a curtain with a bastion on the ocean side. The parapet is twenty-five feet thick, averages twenty feet in height, with traverses rising ten feet above it, and running back on their tops, which were from eight to twelve feet in thickness, to a distance of from thirty to forty feet from the interior crest. The traverses on the left half bastion wer
Fort Caswell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 132
report. headquarters United States forces on Federal Point, N. C., January 25, 1865. General: I have the honor to submit the following detailed report of the operations which resulted in the capture of Fort Fisher and the occupation of Fort Caswell, and the other works at the mouth of Cape Fear river. On the second instant I received from the Lieutenant-General in person orders to take command of the troops destined for the movement. They were three thousand three hundred picked men ry, was busily engaged in landing artillery and ammunition, so that if the assault failed, siege operations might at once be commenced. Consequent to the fall of Fisher, the enemy, during the nights of the sixteenth and seventeenth, blew up Fort Caswell, and abandoned both it and their very extensive works on Smith's island, at Smithville and Reeve's Point, thus placing in our hands all the works erected to defend the mouth of the Cape Fear river. In all the works were found one hundred an
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