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West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
The enemy had done all in his power to strengthen his position during our absence, and fought us with great stubbornness. The First division had the left, and the Second the right and centre. Both sides fought dismounted, in consequence of the dense timber. It was the hardest fight we had yet had, but our men were determined to win. The rebel loss of officers was very heavy. Colonel Green, of the Sixth Virginia, was killed, and also Colonel Collins, of Philadelphia, who graduated at West Point four years ago, and took sides with the South. There were many of our regular officers present who had known him intimately. They buried him and marked the place of his interment. The losses of the First New York dragoons, Sixth Pennsylvania, and First regular cavalry were quite heavy. Here, also, the gallant Captain Joseph P. Ash, of the Fifth United States, was killed. He died in the thickest of the fight, and is deeply lamented by all who knew him. By night we had driven the enem
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
e march and the bivouac. His bright, flashing eye, and clear, ringing voice, inspired and nerved them in the hour of battle. A noble soul to liberty born-- A noble soul for liberty died! In this engagement our loss was pretty severe. Colonel H. Clay Pate, and Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Randolph, were also killed — both of them brave and accomplished officers. Colonel Henry Clay Pate was a native of Western Virginia. He gained some distinction for gallantry as a partisan leader in Kansas during the troubles which attended the formation of a government in that Territory, and on the breaking out of the present war raised a battalion of cavalry in this city, which was soon after merged into the Fifth Virginia cavalry, when he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. He served through the principal battles in Virginia; and, after the promotion of Colonel Rosser to the rank of Brigadier, he was advanced to the command of the regiment. But a few months have elapsed since
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
his troopers. His frank and agreeable face always cheered them in the camp, the march and the bivouac. His bright, flashing eye, and clear, ringing voice, inspired and nerved them in the hour of battle. A noble soul to liberty born-- A noble soul for liberty died! In this engagement our loss was pretty severe. Colonel H. Clay Pate, and Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Randolph, were also killed — both of them brave and accomplished officers. Colonel Henry Clay Pate was a native of Western Virginia. He gained some distinction for gallantry as a partisan leader in Kansas during the troubles which attended the formation of a government in that Territory, and on the breaking out of the present war raised a battalion of cavalry in this city, which was soon after merged into the Fifth Virginia cavalry, when he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. He served through the principal battles in Virginia; and, after the promotion of Colonel Rosser to the rank of Brigadier, he was
Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
oclivities, living on the road. She protested in the strongest terms against the indignity, but was told that if she did not handle them they would not explode. The rebels still continued to show themselves in our front until we had passed Mechanicsville, where General Merritt, by making a demonstration, as though the column were moving toward White House, caused them to destroy a bridge, when we turned short to the right upon the road to Bottom's bridge. We now encamped on the old Gaines' Mill battle-field, and moved at seven o'clock on the morning of the thirteenth, marched in a southeasterly direction, crossed the York river road at Despatch Station, and camped early in the day at Bottom's bridge. It was now necessary to ascertain the whereabouts of General Butler's forces. For the past three days it had rained incessantly; our men were without rations and horses without forage, and the entire command fatigued, hungry and jaded. An officer of General Sheridan's staff, wi
Beaver Dam Station (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
ill dark both small arms and artillery were in constant use. Captain Walter R. Robbins was at one time completely cut off from the balance of the command; but, placing himself at the head of his squadron, he gallantly cut his way through, bringing in several prisoners. While these exciting events were transpiring in the rear, our advance, composed of General Ouster's brigade, of the First division, was doing glorious work in the front. They forded the North Anna river, charged into Beaver Dam station, recaptured three hundred and seventy-eight Union prisoners, including colonels, majors, captains and lieutenants, belonging to the Fifth corps, and taken prisoners while charging the rebel breastworks at Todd's tavern. Their joy, when they saw the flashing blades of the Union cavalry approaching, knew no bounds. They set up a deafening cheer, while the rebel guard, composed of a lieutenant and twenty-five men, skedaddled into the woods. They had no inkling of our approach, and the
Beaver Dam (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
in and flour into the river. A short skirmish here ensued, the enemy retreating precipitately, leaving the telegraph road, turning to the right, and taking the Beaver Dam road. They were closely followed and overtaken, late in the evening, on Mr. Wynne's farm, where they were so closely pressed that they gave battle. A few galload, while our horses got near enough occasionally to lay a blue coat in the dust, and take several of the hindmost in. Wickham, by taking a near route, reached Beaver Dam in advance of Gordon, and just in time to pitch into this living column, which fared but middling. He killed and captured a large body of them. Where BeaverBeaver Dam stood nothing remained but charred and burning ruins of buildings, and two trains of cars, with their contents, that were not consumed, scattered profusely over the ground. The farmers' fencing, far and wide, lighted up the midday sky with a lurid glare. Our evil deeds come home to us, struck us as most beautifully illust
North Anna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
ere transpiring in the rear, our advance, composed of General Ouster's brigade, of the First division, was doing glorious work in the front. They forded the North Anna river, charged into Beaver Dam station, recaptured three hundred and seventy-eight Union prisoners, including colonels, majors, captains and lieutenants, belongingmanner. The road which passes here is the Virginia Central, running from Richmond to Gordonsville. The First division bivouacked on the south side of the North Anna river, while the Second and Third were on the north side. A strong picket guard was thrown out in the rear, and skirmishing was kept up all night. At daylight inly small in these engagements, mostly in wounded. Here night closed on the parties, Fitz Lee still following and harassing their rear till the enemy reached North Anna river, when, about daylight, a sharp fight was kept up, these two brigades holding their own against vastly superior numbers, and steadily driving the enemy before
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
ose we were quietly withdrawn on the afternoon of Sunday, the eighth, and marched back to within about eight miles of Fredericksburg, on the plank-road. Here we bivouacked and made all the preparation we could for the coming trying march. We had alprevailed, and all were anxious to participate in the movement. We moved at daylight, marching in the direction of Fredericksburg until we had arrived within four miles of the city, when we struck off to the left of Spottsylvania Court-house to Hathe service into infantry. General Lee, following his successes, was closely pressing Grant down in the direction of Fredericksburg, giving the cavalry their share in the immediate work. In the meantime it seemed that a vastly organized force of sweeping far around, and tapping our most extended cavalry pickets on the right, on the telegraph road, leading from Fredericksburg to Richmond. Wickham's cavalry brigade--the nearest at hand — took up the pursuit about two hours behind the rear of
Ashland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
ought that the wound was fatal, but Dr. W. W. L. Phillips, Surgeon-in-Chief of the Second division, performed a skilful operation, cutting out the fragments of the shattered bone, and strong hopes are now entertained of his recovery. At four P. M. we crossed the South Anna, and, after marching two miles, bivouacked for the night. At three o'clock on the morning of the eleventh, the First brigade, Second division, was sent, under Brigadier-General H. E. Davies, on a special expedition to Ashland, a distance of seven miles, for the purpose of destroying the railroad and supplies. Great caution and haste were essential, as it was known that General Stuart, with his rebel cavalry, was rapidly making for that point. Our forces arrived in sight of the town at daylight, and formed in line of battle. The First Massachusetts cavalry, Major Sergeant commanding, was selected to charge through the town, which the men did in gallant style, driving a regiment of Virginians, under Colonel Mum
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
and a despatch boat instantly provided to start for Fortress Monroe to communicate with — the War Department. Our men, for three days previous to our arrival at the James river, had literally lived off the country, as many poor families who have lost the whole of their scanty supplies can testify. Our provost-marshals used their utmost endeavors to protect the families of citizens, but upon remonstrating with the men, they would refer you to acts of barbarity committed by the rebels at Fort Pillow and elsewhere. General Sheridan is eminently the right man in the right place. He is, without exception, the best cavalry commander the Army of the Potomac has ever had. He is quick to perceive and bold to execute, and has already won the entire confidence of his command. Brigadier-General D. McM. Gregg was General Sheridan's right-hand man. He consulted him on all occasions, and placed in him the utmost confidence. He knew that where Gregg was, with his fighting division, everythin
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