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Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
at the fort, had remained a mere consolidated affair of regiments in supplies. Returning on February fourth, by steamer Fulton, from leave of absence, and, reporting for duty to the Medical Director, I was expected to proceed to St. Augustine, Florida, and reassume charge of the convalescent hospital. To this end I had already procured transportation, when I was recalled from the boat, and put to the alternative of relieving Surgeon S. W. Gross, United States Volunteers, on Folly and Morris Islands, or to be ready at once for an expedition (probably) into Florida. Expressing myself thankful, because of regarding it a favor, I declared my preference for the expedition, and was, on my request, by written order, directed to report to Brigadier-General T. Seymour, a general, from personal acquaintance, possessing the highest degree of confidence and esteem. Without delay, (nine o'clock P. M.,) reporting, I was ordered to call in the morning for instructions, and received, on so doing
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
former making within one week two trips to Hilton Head and Beaufort. It is, perhaps, not out ofal Director. Surgeon Adolf Majer, U. S. V. Hilton head, South Carolina, April 3-4, 1864. Surgeon Ehat the Cosmopolitan had not yet touched at Hilton Head, but was boarded outside the bar by the Depth New York volunteers, to Jacksonville and Hilton Head, and this, while not yet informed that a foYork volunteers, to Jacksonville, Fla., and Hilton Head. Was not this at Dr. Mulford's own suggest Director. To Surgeon A. Majer, U. S. V. Hilton Head, S. C. Hilton head, S. C. April 8, 1864. SurgeHilton head, S. C. April 8, 1864. Surgeon Ebn. Swift, U. S. A., Medical Director, Department of the South: sir: In reply to several quee in the use of the Department Commander at Hilton Head, and one was left at St. Helena Island, belservant, Dr. Adolf Majer, Surgeon U. S. V. Hilton head, S. C., April 8, 1864. sir: In your comm S. V. Surgeon Ebn. Swift, U. S. A., Medical Director, Department of the South, Hilton Head, S. C. [2 more...]
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
ng an effort to do so by requesting this privilege under a flag of truce. I made the proposition to the General commanding, who entertained the opinion that they might be well taken care of by the enemy, but he finally yielded to the request, which, unfortunately, was refused by our opponents. Meanwhile, the number of wounded at this post (including those of former encounters) has decreased to one hundred and sixty-five by transfer of cases to transport steamers Cosmopolitan, Dictator and Delaware, the former making within one week two trips to Hilton Head and Beaufort. It is, perhaps, not out of place to recommend that no general hospital, beyond those already existing, be established; and especially that the general hospital at Jacksonville be merely conducted as a receiving depot, whence to forward to the above hospitals, adding thereto St. Augustine, Florida. The remoteness from the main depot of supplies of the department, with all its annoying and delaying consequences, and
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
ng consequences, and the readiness with which the returning empty transports can be employed for transportation of sick and wounded, brings me to this conclusion; and, while the interior of Florida, in regard to healthfulness among a larger command, is yet to be tested, there presents itself at the convalescent hospital, St. Augustine, a hospital arrangement which, when completed, will meet all demands.of sanitary law, with no heavy expenses. Should the army of occupation advance toward Middle Florida, there will be an easy and quick communication with the delightful seaside of the old Spanish colony. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Dr. Adolf Majer, Surgeon United States Volunteers, &c. Medical Director's office, April 3, 1864, sir: In your report of the battle of Olustee, you mention having telegraphed Surgeon Smith, in charge of general hospital, Jacksonville, to forward you lint, bandages, and stimulants, and to call on Sanitary Commission. I desire you
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
d myself with procuring a list of the regiments under orders for the expedition, and of getting some information as to the qualities of any more prominent surgeons — an information, as far as it would go, readily given by Surgeon Craven, the Medical Purveyor. In the course of the day the positive assurance that everything would be attended to by the Medical Director began to lose somewhat of its strength, from the direct inquiry of Surgeon Swift, how many ambulances there were at Beaufort, South Carolina, and how many I had already? The question How many I had already? ran in direct line against the assurance given me. The question, How many there were at Beaufort? I justly thought could better and more accurately be answered from the reports of my successor, the Chief of General Hospitals there, than from any guess, by a recollection since the month of September; and my doubts were certainly not dispelled by the circumstance, that when, by transport General Hunter, six ambulance
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
by them. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Ebn. Swift, Surgeon, United States Army, Medical Director. Surgeon Adolf Majer, U. S. V. Hilton head, South Carolina, April 3-4, 1864. Surgeon Ebn. Swift, U. S. A., Medical Director: sir: Having mentioned in my report of the battle of Olustee, that I telegraphed Surgeon Sdred. There were, to my knowledge, only three amputations. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Dr. Adolf Majer, Surgeon U. S. V. Hilton head, S. C., April 8, 1864. sir: In your communication to me of this date, you say: Should I have received a written order, instruction or direction, its execution would hasir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Ebn. Swift, Surgeon, U. S. A., Medical Director To Surgeon Adolf Majer, Surgeon, U. S. V., (present.) Hilton head, S. C., April 8, 1864. sir: The charge of the ambulances is, if I am correct, by Army Regulations, given to the Quartermaster Department, and I would, however I might
Folly Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
d, as well as at the fort, had remained a mere consolidated affair of regiments in supplies. Returning on February fourth, by steamer Fulton, from leave of absence, and, reporting for duty to the Medical Director, I was expected to proceed to St. Augustine, Florida, and reassume charge of the convalescent hospital. To this end I had already procured transportation, when I was recalled from the boat, and put to the alternative of relieving Surgeon S. W. Gross, United States Volunteers, on Folly and Morris Islands, or to be ready at once for an expedition (probably) into Florida. Expressing myself thankful, because of regarding it a favor, I declared my preference for the expedition, and was, on my request, by written order, directed to report to Brigadier-General T. Seymour, a general, from personal acquaintance, possessing the highest degree of confidence and esteem. Without delay, (nine o'clock P. M.,) reporting, I was ordered to call in the morning for instructions, and receiv
Sanderson (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
railroad. At daybreak, February twentieth, the command took its line of march on the road to Sanderson, with its cavalry brigade and Elder's battery, under command of Colonel Guy Henry, in the advance. Passing Sanderson, the general commanding was informed, that we should meet the enemy in force — as the information would have it, fifteen thousand strong — some miles this side of Lake City, b, which, during the battle, was quietly drawn up in the rear of our right and left. Passing Sanderson, I sent the following telegrams: 1. To Surgeon in charge of Field Hospital at Barber's Sta Assistant-Surgeon C. A. Defendorf, Forty-eighth New York volunteers, and twenty-three more at Sanderson, we had now, after dismounting two companies of cavalry, for the purpose of securing an additied to, I had received a telegram from the Medical Director, then at Jacksonville, delivered at Sanderson, ten miles in advance of Barber's, when, by instructions, I had given the day previous, our si
St. Augustine (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
recommend that no general hospital, beyond those already existing, be established; and especially that the general hospital at Jacksonville be merely conducted as a receiving depot, whence to forward to the above hospitals, adding thereto St. Augustine, Florida. The remoteness from the main depot of supplies of the department, with all its annoying and delaying consequences, and the readiness with which the returning empty transports can be employed for transportation of sick and wounded, bringell as at the fort, had remained a mere consolidated affair of regiments in supplies. Returning on February fourth, by steamer Fulton, from leave of absence, and, reporting for duty to the Medical Director, I was expected to proceed to St. Augustine, Florida, and reassume charge of the convalescent hospital. To this end I had already procured transportation, when I was recalled from the boat, and put to the alternative of relieving Surgeon S. W. Gross, United States Volunteers, on Folly and
Baldwin, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
to town, the necessity of establishing a field hospital at that comparatively secure place, and which the General, I knew from conversation, would, (and did) fortify, I had selected more than half the regimental supplies to be brought by rail to Baldwin and thence by wheel to Barber's, and these supplies had arrived about the same hour with the General and staff, on Friday, nineteenth, and could be regarded as more than sufficient. To make sure of the supplies for the post hospital, Jacksonvilmust, therefore, entirely be left for his action. While in the name of our wounded, I feel thankful for the timely supplies, surgical aid and assistance has not been required, nor, if I am correct, been rendered. In forwarding the wounded from Baldwin, I sent one assistant surgeon with each car (drawn by horses), and Mr. Day's personal services were there meritorious beyond praise, as was his offer to stay, in addition to Assistant Surgeon Defendorf, Forty-eighth New York volunteers, with the
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