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Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 156
e, when the case was reported to him, with admirable good judgment, declined to recognize the validity of the claim asserted, as the city had been taken possession of by one of his subordinates before he (General Wilson) could be advised of the existence of an armistice, and he therefore held as prisoners of war Major-Generals Howell Cobb and G. W. Smith, and Brigadier-Generals Mackall, Robertson, and Mercer. On the twenty-first, General Wilson was notified by General Sherman, from Raleigh, North Carolina, over the enemy's telegraph wires, and through the headquarters of General Joseph Johnston, that the reported armistice was a reality, and that he was to cease further operations. To return to General Stoneman's expedition from East Tennessee. Owing to the difficulty of procuring animals for his command, and the bad condition of the roads, General Stoneman was only enabled to start from Knoxville about the twentieth of March, simultaneously with General Wilson's departure from C
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 156
l Canby, at New Orleans, for the purpose of taking part in an expedition at that time preparing to operate against Mobile. Smith's corps started from Eastport on the sixth of February, and Knipe's division of cavalry left Nashville on the twelfth. About the period of the departure of Smith's corps information was received, through various sources, to the effect that part of the shattered remnants of Hood's army, viz., Cheatham's and Lee's corps, where on their way from Mississippi to South Carolina, moving via Selma and Montgomery, Alabama, to reinforce that portion of the enemy's army operating against General Sherman. There remained in Central Mississippi, under General Taylor, but one corps of the enemy's infantry, and about seven thousand of Forrest's cavalry, the headquarters of the command being at Meridian, Mississippi. On the sixth of February a communication was received from Lieutenant-General Grant, directing an expedition, commanded by General Stoneman, to be sent f
Ocmulgee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 156
lle road. At daylight on the eighth Colonel Harndon continued the pursuit, finding the camp occupied by Davis on the evening previous, between the forks of Alligator creek, which was reached just four hours after it had been vacated. The trail was pursued as far as the ford over Gum Swamp creek, Pulaski county, when darkness rendered it too indistinct to follow, and the command encamped for the night, having marched forty miles that day. On the ninth Colonel Harndon pushed on to the Ocmulgee river, crossed at Brown's ferry, and went to Abbeville, where he ascertained Davis' train had left that place at one A. M. that same day, and had gone toward Irwinsville, in Irwin county. With this information Colonel Harndon moved rapidly on toward the latter town, halting within a short distance of it to wait for daylight, in order to make certain of the capture. Before leaving Abbeville, Colonel Harndon, learning of the approach, from the direction of Hawkinsville, of the Fourth Michiga
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 156
commanded by General Stoneman, to be sent from East Tennessee to penetrate North Carolina, and well down towaTo return to General Stoneman's expedition from East Tennessee. Owing to the difficulty of procuring animals in that event, of his forcing a passage through East Tennessee via Lynchburg and Knoxville. To guard against o move from Huntsville, Alabama, as far up into East Tennessee as it could supply itself, repairing the railroed with the prisoners and captured artillery to East Tennessee, reporting his arrival, on the nineteenth, at Gto open up communication through to Greenville, East Tennessee. The object in leaving the cavalry on the othees distant, whereas the distance to Greenville, East Tennessee, was but sixty. Coming to the conclusion that Stoneman, from Macon, Georgia, and Greenville, East Tennessee, almost simultaneously. The question naturallying to be concentrated at some convenient point in Tennessee or Kentucky, preparatory to being mustered out or
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 156
made by me, January 20, as follows : See page 359, ante. General A. J. Smith's corps, at that period, was with me at Eastport, Mississippi; four divisions of General Wilson's cavalry were encamped on the opposite or north bank of the Tennessee river, at Waterloo and Gravelly Springs, Alabama, and the Fourth corps, Major-General Stanley commanding, was stationed at Huntsville, Alabama. This, with the ordinary garrisons of the country, composed my command. The General-in-chief of the cation was being restored, to the accomplishment of which the people of the country zealously gave their assistance. May sixteenth General Grant, through his Chief of Staff, General Rawlins, directed me to order to some point north of the Tennessee river all of Wilson's cavalry except four thousand veterans, who are to remain at Macon, Augusta, and Atlanta, Georgia; those returning to be concentrated at some convenient point in Tennessee or Kentucky, preparatory to being mustered out or othe
Salem (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 156
river and several creeks, as well as the depots of supplies. The detachment sent to Salem did the same, and proceeded to within four miles of Lynchburg, destroying as they advanced. A railroad was never more thoroughly dismantled than was the East Tennesse and Virginia railroad, from Wytheville to near Lynchburg. Concentrating his command, General Stoneman returned to North Carolina, via Jacksonville and Taylorsville, and went to Germantown, whence Palmer's brigade was sent to Salem, North Carolina, to destroy the large cotton factories located there, and burn the bridges on the railroad betwen Greensboroa and Danville, and between Greensboroa and the Yadkin river, which was most thoroughly accomplished, after some fighting, by which we captured about four hundred prisoners. At Salem, seven thousand bales of cotton were burned by our forces. From Germantown the main body moved south to Salisbury, where they found about three thousand of the enemy defending the place, and
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 156
nuous, was extended across the State of Georgia from northwest to south-east, and communication established through the late so-called Southern Confederacy. With characteristic energy, Generals Wilson and Palmer had handbills printed and profusely circulated in all directions throughout the country, offering the President's reward for the apprehension of Davis, and nothing could exceed the watchfulness exhibited by their commands. On the third of May, Davis dismissed his escort at Washington, Georgia, and accompanied by about half a dozen followers, set out to endeavor to pass our lines. Nothing definite was learned of the whereabouts of the fugitives until on the evening of the seventh of May, the First Wisconsin cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Harndon commanding, with one hundred and fifty men, ascertained at Dublin, on the Oconee river, fifty-five miles south-east from Macon, that Davis and party had crossed the river at that point during the day, and had moved out on the J
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 156
On the fourteenth operations were resumed by Upton's division moving through Mount Meigs and Tuskegee toward Columbus, Georgia, and Colonel La Grange, with three regiments of his brigade, of McCook's division, marching along the railroad to West Point, via Opelika. On the sixteenth, General Upton, with about four hundred dismounted men, assaulted and carried the breastworks of Columbus, saving, by the impetuosity of his attacks, the bridges over the Chattahochee, and capturing fifty-two fistol factory, accoutrements, shops, paper-mills, four cotton factories, fifteen locomotives, two hundred cars, and an immense amount of cotton, all of which were burned. The same day, the sixteenth of April, La Grange captured Fort Taylor, at West Point, above Columbus, on the Chattahochee, after assaulting it on three sides, the defence being stubborn. Three hundred prisoners, three guns, and several battle-flags were taken, besides a large quantity of supplies. On the eighteenth the marc
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 156
s to cease further operations. To return to General Stoneman's expedition from East Tennessee. Owing to the difficulty of procuring animals for his command, and the bad condition of the roads, General Stoneman was only enabled to start from Knoxville about the twentieth of March, simultaneously with General Wilson's departure from Chickasaw, Alabama. In the meantime General Sherman had captured Columbia, South Carolina, and was moving northward into North Carolina. About this period reports reached me of the possibility of the evacuation of Lee's army at Richmond and Petersburg, Virginia, and in that event, of his forcing a passage through East Tennessee via Lynchburg and Knoxville. To guard against that contingency, Stoneman was sent toward Lynchburg to destroy the railroad and military resources of that section, and of Western North Carolina. The Fourth Army Corps was ordered to move from Huntsville, Alabama, as far up into East Tennessee as it could supply itself, repairin
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 156
Doc. 78. General Thomas' official report. headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Nashville, June 1, 1865. General: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from the date of the last report made by me, January 20, as folate against Mobile. Smith's corps started from Eastport on the sixth of February, and Knipe's division of cavalry left Nashville on the twelfth. About the period of the departure of Smith's corps information was received, through various sources Total 1 2 6 27 54 3 4 1 100 924 Grand total                   1,122 Report of Rebel Deserters received at Nashville, Tennessee, from January 21 to May 9, (inclusive,) 1865. received. commissioned officers. enlisted men. January 21 to Total 54 2,542 Grand total   2,596 headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Office Provost Marshal General, Nashville June 8, 1865. Respectfully forwarded for the information of the Major-General Commanding. J. G. Parkhurst, Breve
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