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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 184
Doc. 95. fight with the Albemarle. Confederate States steamer Albemarle, Plymouth, N. C., May 7, 1864. Commander B. F. Pinkney, Commanding, etc.: Sir — I have the honor to report that in obedience to yours of the fifth instant, I left here at meridian of that day, together with the prize steamer Bombshell, as tender, and the Cotton Plant, to convoy to Alligator river. As soon as we reached the mouth of Roanoake river, we discovered six of the enemy's gun-boats in the Sound, about ten miles distant. See Document 17, page 212, Volume 10, Rebellion Record. They immediately got under way, and stood down the Sound, E. N.E., until we had run about sixteen miles, when three more gun-boats (double-enders) of a much more formidable class, carrying from ten to twelve guns each, made their appearance. Perceiving the unequal contest in which we were compelled to engage, I immediately prepared for action. The enemy steamed up in two columns, half a mile apart, delivering his
Alligator (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 184
Doc. 95. fight with the Albemarle. Confederate States steamer Albemarle, Plymouth, N. C., May 7, 1864. Commander B. F. Pinkney, Commanding, etc.: Sir — I have the honor to report that in obedience to yours of the fifth instant, I left here at meridian of that day, together with the prize steamer Bombshell, as tender, and the Cotton Plant, to convoy to Alligator river. As soon as we reached the mouth of Roanoake river, we discovered six of the enemy's gun-boats in the Sound, about ten miles distant. See Document 17, page 212, Volume 10, Rebellion Record. They immediately got under way, and stood down the Sound, E. N.E., until we had run about sixteen miles, when three more gun-boats (double-enders) of a much more formidable class, carrying from ten to twelve guns each, made their appearance. Perceiving the unequal contest in which we were compelled to engage, I immediately prepared for action. The enemy steamed up in two columns, half a mile apart, delivering his
Roanoke (United States) (search for this): chapter 184
Doc. 95. fight with the Albemarle. Confederate States steamer Albemarle, Plymouth, N. C., May 7, 1864. Commander B. F. Pinkney, Commanding, etc.: Sir — I have the honor to report that in obedience to yours of the fifth instant, I left here at meridian of that day, together with the prize steamer Bombshell, as tender, and the Cotton Plant, to convoy to Alligator river. As soon as we reached the mouth of Roanoake river, we discovered six of the enemy's gun-boats in the Sound, about ten miles distant. See Document 17, page 212, Volume 10, Rebellion Record. They immediately got under way, and stood down the Sound, E. N.E., until we had run about sixteen miles, when three more gun-boats (double-enders) of a much more formidable class, carrying from ten to twelve guns each, made their appearance. Perceiving the unequal contest in which we were compelled to engage, I immediately prepared for action. The enemy steamed up in two columns, half a mile apart, delivering his
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 184
Doc. 95. fight with the Albemarle. Confederate States steamer Albemarle, Plymouth, N. C., May 7, 1864. Commander B. F. Pinkney, Commanding, etc.: Sir — I have the honor to report that in obedience to yours of the fifth instant, I left here at meridian of that day, together with the prize steamer Bombshell, as tender, and the Cotton Plant, to convoy to Alligator river. As soon as we reached the mouth of Roanoake river, we discovered six of the enemy's gun-boats in the Sound, about ten miles distant. See Document 17, page 212, Volume 10, Rebellion Record. They immediately got under way, and stood down the Sound, E. N.E., until we had run about sixteen miles, when three more gun-boats (double-enders) of a much more formidable class, carrying from ten to twelve guns each, made their appearance. Perceiving the unequal contest in which we were compelled to engage, I immediately prepared for action. The enemy steamed up in two columns, half a mile apart, delivering his
John Benton (search for this): chapter 184
bored from the tiller giving way, and the impossibility of producing steam enough to manage the vessel to advantage, prevented me from inflicting much greater damage than we did. The smoke-stack was riddled to such an extent as to render it useless, and so great was my extremity at one time that I was forced to tear down the bulkheads, throw in all my bacon, lard and other combustible matter, to produce steam enough to bring me back to the river. I cannot speak too highly of the officers and crew, especially of the following-named men, viz.: John Benton, James Cullington, J. B. Cooper, H. A. Kahn, John Smith, H. P. Hoy, Thomas Wooten, John Steely, and T. Nichols. The pilot, John B. Hopkins, deserves great credit for the manner in which he manoeuvred the vessel, and brought her safely back to port. Since the engagement, I have learned by flag of truce that there was no one hurt on the Bombshell. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. M. Cooke, Commander, C. S. N.
abored from the tiller giving way, and the impossibility of producing steam enough to manage the vessel to advantage, prevented me from inflicting much greater damage than we did. The smoke-stack was riddled to such an extent as to render it useless, and so great was my extremity at one time that I was forced to tear down the bulkheads, throw in all my bacon, lard and other combustible matter, to produce steam enough to bring me back to the river. I cannot speak too highly of the officers and crew, especially of the following-named men, viz.: John Benton, James Cullington, J. B. Cooper, H. A. Kahn, John Smith, H. P. Hoy, Thomas Wooten, John Steely, and T. Nichols. The pilot, John B. Hopkins, deserves great credit for the manner in which he manoeuvred the vessel, and brought her safely back to port. Since the engagement, I have learned by flag of truce that there was no one hurt on the Bombshell. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. M. Cooke, Commander, C. S. N.
Doc. 95. fight with the Albemarle. Confederate States steamer Albemarle, Plymouth, N. C., May 7, 1864. Commander B. F. Pinkney, Commanding, etc.: Sir — I have the honor to report that in obedience to yours of the fifth instant, I left here at meridian of that day, together with the prize steamer Bombshell, as tender, and the Cotton Plant, to convoy to Alligator river. As soon as we reached the mouth of Roanoake river, we discovered six of the enemy's gun-boats in the Sound, about ten miles distant. See Document 17, page 212, Volume 10, Rebellion Record. They immediately got under way, and stood down the Sound, E. N.E., until we had run about sixteen miles, when three more gun-boats (double-enders) of a much more formidable class, carrying from ten to twelve guns each, made their appearance. Perceiving the unequal contest in which we were compelled to engage, I immediately prepared for action. The enemy steamed up in two columns, half a mile apart, delivering his
bored from the tiller giving way, and the impossibility of producing steam enough to manage the vessel to advantage, prevented me from inflicting much greater damage than we did. The smoke-stack was riddled to such an extent as to render it useless, and so great was my extremity at one time that I was forced to tear down the bulkheads, throw in all my bacon, lard and other combustible matter, to produce steam enough to bring me back to the river. I cannot speak too highly of the officers and crew, especially of the following-named men, viz.: John Benton, James Cullington, J. B. Cooper, H. A. Kahn, John Smith, H. P. Hoy, Thomas Wooten, John Steely, and T. Nichols. The pilot, John B. Hopkins, deserves great credit for the manner in which he manoeuvred the vessel, and brought her safely back to port. Since the engagement, I have learned by flag of truce that there was no one hurt on the Bombshell. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. M. Cooke, Commander, C. S. N.
abored from the tiller giving way, and the impossibility of producing steam enough to manage the vessel to advantage, prevented me from inflicting much greater damage than we did. The smoke-stack was riddled to such an extent as to render it useless, and so great was my extremity at one time that I was forced to tear down the bulkheads, throw in all my bacon, lard and other combustible matter, to produce steam enough to bring me back to the river. I cannot speak too highly of the officers and crew, especially of the following-named men, viz.: John Benton, James Cullington, J. B. Cooper, H. A. Kahn, John Smith, H. P. Hoy, Thomas Wooten, John Steely, and T. Nichols. The pilot, John B. Hopkins, deserves great credit for the manner in which he manoeuvred the vessel, and brought her safely back to port. Since the engagement, I have learned by flag of truce that there was no one hurt on the Bombshell. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. M. Cooke, Commander, C. S. N.
James Cullington (search for this): chapter 184
abored from the tiller giving way, and the impossibility of producing steam enough to manage the vessel to advantage, prevented me from inflicting much greater damage than we did. The smoke-stack was riddled to such an extent as to render it useless, and so great was my extremity at one time that I was forced to tear down the bulkheads, throw in all my bacon, lard and other combustible matter, to produce steam enough to bring me back to the river. I cannot speak too highly of the officers and crew, especially of the following-named men, viz.: John Benton, James Cullington, J. B. Cooper, H. A. Kahn, John Smith, H. P. Hoy, Thomas Wooten, John Steely, and T. Nichols. The pilot, John B. Hopkins, deserves great credit for the manner in which he manoeuvred the vessel, and brought her safely back to port. Since the engagement, I have learned by flag of truce that there was no one hurt on the Bombshell. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. M. Cooke, Commander, C. S. N.
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