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Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
openly denounce him as a common thief, fit for nothing but to plunder unarmed citizens and rob defenceless towns. General Burbridge and his command have shown conspicuous skill and gallantry in this whole campaign. The General has proved his title to an independent command, and Colonels Brown, Hanson, and Ratcliff have ably seconded him in all his movements. The men have endured privations and fought the enemy like heroes, and deserve the very highest meed of praise. Kentucky, Ohio, and Michigan men have done the work effectually this time, and none have borne themselves more gallantly than the Twelfth Ohio cavalry. But, Kentucky has suffered a good deal by the raid. The Covington and Lexington and Lexington and Louisville railroads have been damaged considerably and partly burned, and hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of property destroyed and stolen. The whole country has been full of spies; home rebels have given them aid and comfort, and helped in the work. If General
Beaver, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
Louisville, June 18, 1864. General Burbridge, some weeks ago, started on an expedition into South-western Virginia. His objective point was the Salines, where were encamped about four thousand rebels. He moved up Sandy Valley to the mouth of Beaver, where he was compelled to await supplies. Colonel J. M. Brown was ordered forward with his brigade to reconnoitre. He went to Pound Gap, and moved out into Virginia, skirmishing with the rebels several miles, when he found that the rebels were in ambush in superior force, and were attempting to draw him into the snug trap set for him. He then fell back to the Gap, to avoid being cut off by the flanking movements of the rebels, and from the Gap fell back to Beaver; and John Morgan followed to the Gap, and, as soon as Brown left it, passed through it, taking the direct road to Mt. Sterling. Colonel Brown was immediately ordered in pursuit, and followed close behind Morgan, picking up stragglers. Morgan's force consisted of about tw
Sandy Valley (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
Doc. 103. Morgan's raid in Kentucky. Louisville, June 18, 1864. General Burbridge, some weeks ago, started on an expedition into South-western Virginia. His objective point was the Salines, where were encamped about four thousand rebels. He moved up Sandy Valley to the mouth of Beaver, where he was compelled to await supplies. Colonel J. M. Brown was ordered forward with his brigade to reconnoitre. He went to Pound Gap, and moved out into Virginia, skirmishing with the rebels several miles, when he found that the rebels were in ambush in superior force, and were attempting to draw him into the snug trap set for him. He then fell back to the Gap, to avoid being cut off by the flanking movements of the rebels, and from the Gap fell back to Beaver; and John Morgan followed to the Gap, and, as soon as Brown left it, passed through it, taking the direct road to Mt. Sterling. Colonel Brown was immediately ordered in pursuit, and followed close behind Morgan, picking up stra
Cynthiana, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
hich was false), with two thousand men, and he immediately faced about, and, passing through Georgetown, again moved on Cynthiana. General Burbridge, with his command, reached Lexington about noon, Friday, and, hastily remounting a portion of his forces, started in pursuit. He came upon Morgan Sunday morning, at Cynthiana, drawn up in line of battle and awaiting him. Burbridge immediately attacked him, and in fifty-five minutes had Morgan's command routed and flying in every direction. Morgifty available men defended it. He could have gone out by Frankfort, but allowed himself to be scared and turned toward Cynthiana, by a trick; he stood up for a fair fight at Cynthiana and was whipped, and his army broken up in fifty-five minutes. HCynthiana and was whipped, and his army broken up in fifty-five minutes. His fleeing bands are being overtaken, whipped and captured on all sides. The horses he stole — many of them — have been recaptured. Thus ends the career of this great horse-thief, and his gang of robbers and plunderers. To call them soldiers woul
Ticktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
y and seven hundred infantry, without any artillery. His infantry and one brigade of cavalry, halted at Mt. Sterling, while the other brigade of cavalry, under Howard Smith, passed on toward Lexington, stealing horses and robbing citizens. At Mt. Sterling, they robbed the bank of about sixty thousand dollars, gutted the stores and stole all the horses in the region roundabout. General Burbridge attacked them on Thursday morning. He captured their rear picket, about twenty-five strong, at Ticktown, and moved up on the main body, completely surprising them. The inside pickets were shot down, all of them (about thirty) being killed; and Colonel Brown, who was in the advance, pushed right through the camp of the infantry, shooting them before they had finished their morning nap, and attacked the brigade under Griffith. Hanson's brigade coming up, joined in the attack, and the little battle became fierce and bloody. Hanson pushed his artillery too far forward, and the rebels charged a
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
with his command, reached Lexington about noon, Friday, and, hastily remounting a portion of his forces, started in pursuit. He came upon Morgan Sunday morning, at Cynthiana, drawn up in line of battle and awaiting him. Burbridge immediately attacked him, and in fifty-five minutes had Morgan's command routed and flying in every direction. Morgan's loss here was about five hundred. His force was divided into half a dozen parts, each part taking care of itself. The main force fled toward Augusta, under Morgan himself, which was pursued by Colonel Hanson, again attacked and routed, and again losing several hundred prisoners. The whole country is full of the disorganized and fleeing rebels, and they are being picked up all over the country. Thus has ended Morgan's last raid. He came into the State with about two thousand seven hundred men. He robbed and plundered on all sides. He was pursued and whipped badly three times in six days, and will lose nearly two thousand of his men. M
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
Doc. 103. Morgan's raid in Kentucky. Louisville, June 18, 1864. General Burbridge, some weeks ago, started on an expedition into South-western Virginia. His objective point was the Salines, where were encamped about four thousand rebels. He moved up Sandy Valley to the mouth of Beaver, where he was compelled to await supplies. Colonel J. M. Brown was ordered forward with his brigade to reconnoitre. He went to Pound Gap, and moved out into Virginia, skirmishing with the rebels several miles, when he found that the rebels were in ambush in superior force, and were attempting to draw him into the snug trap set for him. He then fell back to the Gap, to avoid being cut off by the flanking movements of the rebels, and from the Gap fell back to Beaver; and John Morgan followed to the Gap, and, as soon as Brown left it, passed through it, taking the direct road to Mt. Sterling. Colonel Brown was immediately ordered in pursuit, and followed close behind Morgan, picking up stra
Versailles (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
name all those who have lost horses; their name is legion. Everywhere they went they stole horses, from friend and foe. On reaching Georgetown, Morgan and Howard Smith demanded the keys of the bank, but were told that the money was run off. After leaving Lexington, it was evidently Morgan's intention to attack Frankfort, and move out through the south-eastern part of the State, and he had moved his command through Georgetown in that direction. But he learned that General Burbridge was at Versailles (which was false), with two thousand men, and he immediately faced about, and, passing through Georgetown, again moved on Cynthiana. General Burbridge, with his command, reached Lexington about noon, Friday, and, hastily remounting a portion of his forces, started in pursuit. He came upon Morgan Sunday morning, at Cynthiana, drawn up in line of battle and awaiting him. Burbridge immediately attacked him, and in fifty-five minutes had Morgan's command routed and flying in every direction.
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
Doc. 103. Morgan's raid in Kentucky. Louisville, June 18, 1864. General Burbridge, some weeks ago, started on an expedition into South-western Virginia. His objective point was the Salines, where were encamped about four thousand rebels. He moved up Sandy Valley to the mouth of Beaver, where he was compelled to await rne themselves more gallantly than the Twelfth Ohio cavalry. But, Kentucky has suffered a good deal by the raid. The Covington and Lexington and Lexington and Louisville railroads have been damaged considerably and partly burned, and hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of property destroyed and stolen. The whole country hast-marshals, and other agents, may arrest all males and females who have encouraged or harbored guerrillas and robbers, and you may cause them to be collected in Louisville; and when you have enough — say three or four hundred--I will cause them to be sent down the Mississippi, through their guerrilla gauntlet, and by a sailing shi
Mount Sterling, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 192
and, as soon as Brown left it, passed through it, taking the direct road to Mt. Sterling. Colonel Brown was immediately ordered in pursuit, and followed close beh, without any artillery. His infantry and one brigade of cavalry, halted at Mt. Sterling, while the other brigade of cavalry, under Howard Smith, passed on toward Lexington, stealing horses and robbing citizens. At Mt. Sterling, they robbed the bank of about sixty thousand dollars, gutted the stores and stole all the horses in tas at Winchester, threatening Lexington. Hearing of the route of his men at Mt. Sterling, he moved on Lexington Thursday night, and commenced skirmishing with the smir previous hard service and hard fighting, that he was compelled to halt in Mt. Sterling until Friday morning. This gave Morgan time to attack Lexington. It was defickets were surprised and captured; his command was surprised and routed at Mount Sterling; he prowled around Lexington, with four or five hundred men, two or three d
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