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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Mountain (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Doc. 9. fight at round Mountain, Tenn. Colonel Grose's report. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose
McMinnville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Doc. 9. fight at round Mountain, Tenn. Colonel Grose's report. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose,
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Doc. 9. fight at round Mountain, Tenn. Colonel Grose's report. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose
Round Mountain (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Doc. 9. fight at round Mountain, Tenn. Colonel Grose's report. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose,
D. P. Woodbury (search for this): chapter 33
Doc. 9. fight at round Mountain, Tenn. Colonel Grose's report. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose,
William Grose (search for this): chapter 33
t. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose, Colonel, commanding Tenth Brigade. J. E. Holland, A. A. A. G.
Doc. 9. fight at round Mountain, Tenn. Colonel Grose's report. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose
Doc. 9. fight at round Mountain, Tenn. Colonel Grose's report. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose
J. E. Holland (search for this): chapter 33
rt. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose, Colonel, commanding Tenth Brigade. J. E. Holland, A. A. A. G.
Mendenhall (search for this): chapter 33
rt. Murfreesboro, Tennessee, August 30, 1862. General J. Ammon. McMinnville, Tennessee: I arrived here this morning at six o'clock. The forces under my command had an engagement with General Forrest between three and four o'clock P. M., on the twenty-seventh instant, at Round Mountain, two and a half miles from Woodbury. He made the attack upon our rear, and, as he supposed, upon our train. But instead of my train, his heavy force came in contact with the Twenty-third Kentucky, under Colonel Mundy. The enemy were handsomely repulsed, and with a portion of Captain Mendenhall's battery, the right wing of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and Colonel Mundy's regiment, we pursued and drove them over two miles, scattering them in every direction. Our loss is four of the Twenty-third Kentucky, and one of Lieutenant-Colonel Cochran's cavalry wounded. The loss of the enemy is much larger. Your obedient servant, W. Grose, Colonel, commanding Tenth Brigade. J. E. Holland, A. A. A. G.
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