hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 350 0 Browse Search
Ralph Waldo Emerson 210 0 Browse Search
Samuel Longfellow 187 13 Browse Search
John A. Andrew 166 0 Browse Search
Elizur Wright 139 1 Browse Search
Julian Hawthorne 98 0 Browse Search
George L. Stearns 96 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 94 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell 83 1 Browse Search
W. T. G. Morton 74 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches. Search the whole document.

Found 125 total hits in 52 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Pike County Ballads, a mixture of sentiment and profanity. Then he went on to say: I want my children, when they grow up, to read the classics. My boy will go to college, of course; and he will translate Homer and Virgil, and Horace,--I think very highly of Horace; but the literal meaning is a different thing from understanding the poetry. Then my daughters will learn French and German, and I shall expect them to read Schiller and Goethe, Moliere and Racine, as well as Shakespeare and Milton. After that they can read what they like, but they will have a standard by which to judge other authors. He was afraid that the students wasted too much time in painting play-bills and other similar exercises of ingenuity, which lead to nothing in the end. He gave some excellent advice to a young lady who was about visiting Europe for the first time, who doubted if she could properly appreciate the works of art and other fine things that she would be called upon to admire. Don't be afr
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 4
of the best judges of oratory, and it was always interesting to listen to him on that subject. He considered Wendell Phillips the perfection of form and delivery, and sometimes very brilliant, but much too rash in his statements. Everett was also good, but lacked warmth and earnestness. Choate was purely a legal pleader, and outside of the court-room not very effective. He thought Webster one of the greatest of orators, fully equal to Cicero; but they both lacked the poetical element. Sumner's sentences were florid and his delivery rather mechanical, but he made a strong impression owing to the evident purity of his motives. The general public, however, had become suspicious of oratory, so that it was no longer as serviceable as formerly. After all, he would say, the main point for a speaker is to have a good cause. Then, if he is thoroughly in earnest, we enjoy hearing him. He once illustrated his subject by the story of a Union general who tried to rally the fugitives at
Wendell Phillips (search for this): chapter 4
s interesting to listen to him on that subject. He considered Wendell Phillips the perfection of form and delivery, and sometimes very brillihe fact that Webster and Choate both came from Dartmouth; that Wendell Phillips graduated at Harvard, but the university had not seen much of him since. At the mention of Wendell Phillips some of the boys from proslavery families began to sneer. Professor Child raised himself up and said determinedly, Wendell Phillips is as good an orator as either of them! He was chagrined, however, at Phillips's later public course,--Phillips's later public course,--his support of Socialism and General Butler. Neither did he like Phillips's Phi Beta Kappa oration, in which he advocated the dagger and dynaPhillips's Phi Beta Kappa oration, in which he advocated the dagger and dynamite for tyrants. A tyrant, said Professor Child, is what anyone chooses to imagine. My hired man may consider me a tyrant and blow me up according to Mr. Phillips' s principle. The assassins of Garfield and McKinley evidently supposed that they were ridding the earth of two of t
t had life. Secondly, the humorous element, for the bowline is all tail. Thirdly, the reflective element; the monotonous motion makes him think of home,--of his wife or sweetheart,--and he ends the second line with Kitty, O, my darlina. I like such primitive verses much better than the Pike County Ballads, a mixture of sentiment and profanity. Then he went on to say: I want my children, when they grow up, to read the classics. My boy will go to college, of course; and he will translate Homer and Virgil, and Horace,--I think very highly of Horace; but the literal meaning is a different thing from understanding the poetry. Then my daughters will learn French and German, and I shall expect them to read Schiller and Goethe, Moliere and Racine, as well as Shakespeare and Milton. After that they can read what they like, but they will have a standard by which to judge other authors. He was afraid that the students wasted too much time in painting play-bills and other similar exerci
Michel Angelo (search for this): chapter 4
hich lead to nothing in the end. He gave some excellent advice to a young lady who was about visiting Europe for the first time, who doubted if she could properly appreciate the works of art and other fine things that she would be called upon to admire. Don't be afraid of that, said Professor Child; you will probably like best just those sights which you do not expect to; but if you do not like them, say so, and let that be the end of it. Now, I am so unfortunate as not to appreciate Michel Angelo. His great horned Moses is nothing more to me than a Silenus in a garden. The fact does not trouble me much, for I find enough to interest me as it is, and I can enjoy life without the Moses. After mentioning a number of desirable expeditions, he added: You will go to Dresden, of course, to see Raphael's Madonna and Titian's Tribute Money ; and then there are the Green Vaults. I have known the Green Vaults to have an excellent effect on some ladies of my acquaintance. They did not
F. H. Hedge (search for this): chapter 4
ident Eliot and praised the dignified manner with which Eliot regarded him. In 1879 he said one day: We are in the half-way stage between a college and a university, and there is consequently great confusion. If we once became a university, pure and simple, all that would be over; but the difficulty is that the material which comes to us is so poor. I do not mean that the young men are lacking in intelligence, but the great majority of them do not brace themselves to the work. As Doctor Hedge says, the heart of the college is in the boating and ball-playing and not in its studies. His third occupation and chief recreation was his rose-garden. The whole space between his front piazza and Kirkland Street was filled with rose-bushes which he tended himself, from the first loosening of the earth in spring until the straw sheaf-caps were tied about them in November. What more delightful occupation for a scholar than working in a rose-garden! There his friends were most likel
for it is a work that can neither be superseded nor excelled. He was the first to arouse English scholars to the importance of this, as may be read in the dedication of a partial edition taken from the Percy manuscripts and published in London in 1861. He recognized in them the true foundation of the finest literature of the modern world, and he considered them so much the better from the fact that they were not composed to be printed, but to be recited or sung. Matthew Arnold wrote in a lettize the popular excitement of those times, when both parties believed that the very existence of the nation depended on the result of the elections. Professor Child was not the least of an alarmist, and deprecated all unnecessary controversy. In 1861 he even cautioned Wendell Phillips Garrison against introducing too strong an appeal for emancipation in his commencement address; but he was as firm as a granite rock on any question of principle, and when he considered a protest in order he was
nt of good scholarship but like a personal slight upon himself. That Emerson graduated near the foot of his class ought not to prove that an idle college life is a sign of genius. Professor Child talked freely in regard to the meetings of the college faculty, for he believed that graduates had a right to know about them. He quoted some amusing anecdotes of a certain professor who led the opposition against President Eliot and praised the dignified manner with which Eliot regarded him. In 1879 he said one day: We are in the half-way stage between a college and a university, and there is consequently great confusion. If we once became a university, pure and simple, all that would be over; but the difficulty is that the material which comes to us is so poor. I do not mean that the young men are lacking in intelligence, but the great majority of them do not brace themselves to the work. As Doctor Hedge says, the heart of the college is in the boating and ball-playing and not
said Professor Child, is what anyone chooses to imagine. My hired man may consider me a tyrant and blow me up according to Mr. Phillips' s principle. The assassins of Garfield and McKinley evidently supposed that they were ridding the earth of two of the worst tyrants that ever existed. Professor Child was exceptionally liberal. He even supported Woman Suffrage for a time, but he held Socialism in a kind of holy horror, --such as one feels of a person who is always making blunders. In 1878 Professor Child and some other political reformers were elected to a Congressional convention and went with the hope of securing a candidate who would represent the educated classes,--the incumbent at that time being a shoe manufacturer. They argued and worked hard all day, but without success. Late in the afternoon the shoe manufacturer, a worthy man but very ignorant, who afterwards became governor of the State, was renominated; and when it was proposed to make the nomination unanimous Pr
I congratulate you on the success of your statement, which I have read with very great interest. John Brown was like a star and still shines in the firmament. We could not have done without him. He considered Governor Andrew's approbation of John Brown as more important than anything that would be written about him in the future. He did not trouble himself much in regard to Lincoln's second election, for he saw that it was a foregone conclusion; but after Andrew Johnson's treachery in 1866, he felt there was a need of unusual exertion. When the November elections arrived, he told his classes: Next Tuesday I shall have to serve my country and there will be no recitations. When Tuesday came we found him on the sidewalk distributing Republican ballots and soliciting votes; and there he remained until the polls closed in the afternoon. He had little patience with educated men who neglected their political duties. Why are you discouraged? he would ask. Times will change. Reme
1 2 3 4 5 6