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Julian Hawthorne (search for this): chapter 5
r's face was reflected on Longfellow's as in a mirror. Hawthorne was a classmate of Longfellow, and in the biography of thr which are always friendly,--but never more than that on Hawthorne's side,--with one exception, where he thanks Longfellow fn; and Longfellow may be said to have opened the door for Hawthorne into the great world. Hawthorne's friendship for PresideHawthorne's friendship for President Pierce proved an advantage to him financially, but it also became a barrier between him and the other literary men of his . Longfellow frankly admitted that he did not understand Hawthorne, and he did not believe that anyone at Bowdoin College unew; but so far as genius was concerned, he believed that Hawthorne would outlive every other writer of his time. He had theenjoyed it. He may not have walked such long distances as Hawthorne, or so rapidly as Dickens, but he was a good walker. Hby storm, did not make so much of an impression on him as Hawthorne's Marble Faun, which he read through in a day and calls a
Charlie Ross (search for this): chapter 5
tances as Hawthorne, or so rapidly as Dickens, but he was a good walker. His sister, Mrs. Greenleaf, built a memorial chapel in North Cambridge for the Episcopal society there, and from this Longfellow formed the habit of walking in that direction by way of the Botanic Garden. Somewhere in the cross streets he became acquainted with two children, the son and daughter of a small shop-keeper. They, of course, told their mother about their white-haired acquaintance, and with the fate of Charlie Ross before her eyes, their mother warned them to keep out of his way. He might be a tramp, and tramps were dangerous! However, it was not long before the children met their white-haired friend again, and the boy asked him: Are you a tramp? Mother thinks you're a tramp, and she wants to know what your name is. It may be presumed that Mr. Longfellow laughed heartily at this misconception, but he said: I think I may call myself a tramp. I tramp a good deal; but you may tell your mother tha
John Brown (search for this): chapter 5
to have gratified his curious, or sentimental admirers; for every autograph he gave would have made a purchaser for his publishers. Harmony did not always prevail in the Saturday Club, for politics was the all-embracing subject in those days and its members represented every shade of political opinion. Emerson, Longfellow, and Lowell were strongly anti-slavery, but they differed in regard to methods. Lowell was what was then called a Seward man, and differed with Emerson in regard to John Brown, and with Longfellow in regard to Sumner. Holmes was still more conservative; and Agassiz was a McClellan Democrat. William Hunt, the painter, believed that the war was caused by the ambition of the leading politicians in the North and South. Longfellow had the advantage of more direct information than the others, and enjoyed the continued successes of the Republican party. In the spring of 1866 a number of Southerners came to Boston to borrow funds in order to rehabilitate their pl
ifax, --a popular book in its time, but not read very much since. He calls Charles Reade a clever and amusing writer. We find nothing concerning Disraeli, Trollope, or Wilkie Collins. Neither do we hear of critical and historical writers like Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, Carlyle, and Froude. He went, however, to call on Carlyle in England, and was greatly impressed by his conversation. The scope of Longfellow's reading does not compare with that of Emerson or Marian Evans; but the doctors say t in their own dialect, greatly to their surprise and satisfaction. From a number of incidents in this journey, related by Rev. Samuel Longfellow, the following has a permanent interest: When the party came to Verona in May, 1869, they found Ruskin elevated on a ladder, from which he was examining the sculpture on a monument. As soon as he heard that the Longfellow party was below, he came down and greeted them very cordially. He was glad that they had stopped at Verona, which was so int
Louis Agassiz (search for this): chapter 5
ve made a purchaser for his publishers. Harmony did not always prevail in the Saturday Club, for politics was the all-embracing subject in those days and its members represented every shade of political opinion. Emerson, Longfellow, and Lowell were strongly anti-slavery, but they differed in regard to methods. Lowell was what was then called a Seward man, and differed with Emerson in regard to John Brown, and with Longfellow in regard to Sumner. Holmes was still more conservative; and Agassiz was a McClellan Democrat. William Hunt, the painter, believed that the war was caused by the ambition of the leading politicians in the North and South. Longfellow had the advantage of more direct information than the others, and enjoyed the continued successes of the Republican party. In the spring of 1866 a number of Southerners came to Boston to borrow funds in order to rehabilitate their plantations, and were introduced at the Union League Club. Finding themselves there in a cong
Marian Evans (search for this): chapter 5
better Miss Muloch's John Halifax, --a popular book in its time, but not read very much since. He calls Charles Reade a clever and amusing writer. We find nothing concerning Disraeli, Trollope, or Wilkie Collins. Neither do we hear of critical and historical writers like Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, Carlyle, and Froude. He went, however, to call on Carlyle in England, and was greatly impressed by his conversation. The scope of Longfellow's reading does not compare with that of Emerson or Marian Evans; but the doctors say that every man of forty knows the food that is good for him, and this is true mentally as well as physically. He refers more frequently to Tennyson than to any other writer, and always in a generous, cordial manner. Of the Idyls of the King he says that the first and third Idyls could only have come from a great poet, but that the second and fourth are not quite equal to the others. Once, at his sister's house, he held out a book in his hand and said: Here is s
T. G. Appleton (search for this): chapter 5
house, with windows on only two sides, is not like a handsome suburban residence. Longfellow could look across the Cambridge marshes and see the sunsets reflected in the water of the Charles River. Here he lived from 1843, when he married Miss Appleton, a daughter of one of the wealthiest merchant-bankers of Boston, until his death by pneumonia in March, 1882. The situation seemed suited to him, and he always remained a true poet and devoted to the muses: Integer vitae scelerisque purus. nts, and hold the water until it could be made useful. He wished that the Alpine Club would take an interest in the matter. After enjoying so much in Switzerland it would be only fair for them to do something for the benefit of the country. Mr. Appleton then said: That is a work for government to do; to which Ruskini replied: Governments do nothing but fill their pockets, and issue this, --taking out a handful of Italian paper currency, which was then much below par. Everyone has his or he
Oliver Wendell Holmes (search for this): chapter 5
ers; for every autograph he gave would have made a purchaser for his publishers. Harmony did not always prevail in the Saturday Club, for politics was the all-embracing subject in those days and its members represented every shade of political opinion. Emerson, Longfellow, and Lowell were strongly anti-slavery, but they differed in regard to methods. Lowell was what was then called a Seward man, and differed with Emerson in regard to John Brown, and with Longfellow in regard to Sumner. Holmes was still more conservative; and Agassiz was a McClellan Democrat. William Hunt, the painter, believed that the war was caused by the ambition of the leading politicians in the North and South. Longfellow had the advantage of more direct information than the others, and enjoyed the continued successes of the Republican party. In the spring of 1866 a number of Southerners came to Boston to borrow funds in order to rehabilitate their plantations, and were introduced at the Union League C
Wilkie Collins (search for this): chapter 5
is too feminine for a man; too masculine for a woman. He says of Dickens, after reading Barnaby Rudge : He is always prodigal and ample, but what a set of vagabonds he contrives to introduce us to! Barnaby Rudge is certainly the most bohemian and esoteric of Dickens's novels. He liked much better Miss Muloch's John Halifax, --a popular book in its time, but not read very much since. He calls Charles Reade a clever and amusing writer. We find nothing concerning Disraeli, Trollope, or Wilkie Collins. Neither do we hear of critical and historical writers like Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, Carlyle, and Froude. He went, however, to call on Carlyle in England, and was greatly impressed by his conversation. The scope of Longfellow's reading does not compare with that of Emerson or Marian Evans; but the doctors say that every man of forty knows the food that is good for him, and this is true mentally as well as physically. He refers more frequently to Tennyson than to any other writer, a
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 5
aternions to appreciate Longfellow's art, or any art pure and simple. Evangeline, which is perhaps the finest of Longfellow's poems, is not a favorite with youthful readers. He was greater as a man, perhaps, than as a poet. Future ages will have to determine this; but he was certainly one of the best poets of his time. Professor Hedge, one of our foremost literary critics, spoke of him as the one American poet whose verses sing themselves; and with the exception of Bryant's Robert of Lincoln, and Poe's Raven, and a few other pieces, this may be taken as a judicious statement. Longfellow's unconsciousness is charming, even when it seems childlike. As a master of verse he has no English rival since Spenser. The trochaic meter in which Hiawatha is written would seem to have been his own invention; At least I can remember no other long poem composed in it. and is a very agreeable change from the perpetual iambics of Byron and Wordsworth. Evangeline is perhaps the most suc
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