hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 350 0 Browse Search
Ralph Waldo Emerson 210 0 Browse Search
Samuel Longfellow 187 13 Browse Search
John A. Andrew 166 0 Browse Search
Elizur Wright 139 1 Browse Search
Julian Hawthorne 98 0 Browse Search
George L. Stearns 96 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 94 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell 83 1 Browse Search
W. T. G. Morton 74 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches. Search the whole document.

Found 336 total hits in 105 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
roma of a foreign air upon him. Longfellow and his whole family were natural cosmopolitans. There was nothing of the proverbial Yankee in their composition. Whittier was a Quaker by creed, but he was also much of a Yankee in style and manner. Emerson looked like a Yankee, and possessed the cool Yankee shrewdness. Lowell's Bethe had greater celebrity he never enjoyed half the worldly prosperity of Longfellow. While Emerson was earning a hard livelihood by lecturing in the West, and Whittier was dwelling in a country farm-house, Longfellow occupied one of the most desirable residences in or about Boston, and had all the means at his command that a mo poetry is that which forces itself upon our memories, so that it becomes part of our life without the least effort of recollection. Such are Emerson's Problem, Whittier's Barbara Frietchie, and Longfellow's Santa Filomena. Whene'er a noble deed is wrought, Whene'er is spoken a noble thought, Our hearts in glad surprise To highe
Henry James (search for this): chapter 5
dyls could only have come from a great poet, but that the second and fourth are not quite equal to the others. Once, at his sister's house, he held out a book in his hand and said: Here is some of the finest dramatic poetry that I have ever read. It was Tennyson's Queen Mary; but there were many who would not have agreed with his estimate of it. Rev. Samuel Longfellow considered the statement very doubtful. In the summer of 1868 Longfellow went to Europe with his family to see what Henry James calls the best of it. Rev. Samuel Longfellow and T. G. Appleton accompanied the party, which, with the addition of Ernest Longfellow's beautiful bride, made a strong impression wherever they were seen. In fact their tour was like a triumphal procession. Longfellow was everywhere treated with the distinction of a famous poet; and his fine appearance and dignified bearing increased the reputation which had already preceded him. His meeting with Tennyson was considered as important as th
Henry W. Longfellow (search for this): chapter 5
in which he obtained his postage stamps; but Longfellow confessed that he had given away a large num every shade of political opinion. Emerson, Longfellow, and Lowell were strongly anti-slavery, but itics but his bad manners that were hissed. Longfellow set his glass down with emphasis, and replieas applause as well as hisses for Sumner. Longfellow had a leonine face, but it was that of a ver story was quite incredible. In his youth Longfellow seems to have taken to guns and fishing-rodsollege in the autumn of 1862 and called on Mr. Longfellow, who had been entertained at his father's his young acquaintance. It is certain that Longfellow addressed a poem to Mrs. Longworth which wilat has ever befallen a man's domestic life. Longfellow was widowed for the second time, and five chd not pass. It was after this calamity that Longfellow undertook his metrical translation of Dante'y heart also there is a cross of snow. In Longfellow's diary we meet with the names of many books[5 more...]
Barbara Frietchie (search for this): chapter 5
some! Heaven no hahnsomer! There is true poetry in this; and so there is in the Indian cradlesong: The poor little bee that lives in the tree; The poor little bee that lives in the tree; Has but one arrow in his quiver. Either of these incidents is sufficient to testify to Longfellow's Hiawatha. The best poetry is that which forces itself upon our memories, so that it becomes part of our life without the least effort of recollection. Such are Emerson's Problem, Whittier's Barbara Frietchie, and Longfellow's Santa Filomena. Whene'er a noble deed is wrought, Whene'er is spoken a noble thought, Our hearts in glad surprise To higher levels rise. Those are fortunate in this life who feel the glad surprise of Longfellow. Hiawatha is equally universal in its application to modern life. The questions of the Indian boy and the replies of his nurse, the good Nikomis, are not confined to the life of the aborigines. Every spirited boy is a Hiawatha, and in one form or anoth
reason was chiefly a political one. At a distance Longfellow's politics attracted little attention, but in Cambridge they could not help being felt. In 1862 a strong movement emanated from the Harvard Law-School to defeat Sumner and Andrew, and the lines became drawn pretty sharply. As it happened, the prominent conservatives with one or two exceptions all lived to the east and north of the college grounds, while Longfellow, Lowell, Doctor Francis (who baptized Longfellow's children), Prof. Asa Gray, and other liberals lived at the west end; and the local division made the contest more acrimonious. The conservatives afterwards felt the bitterness of defeat, and it was many years before they recovered from this. A resident graduate of Harvard, who was accustomed to converse on such subjects as the metaphysics of Hamilton's quaternions, once said that Longfellow was the paragon of schoolgirls, because he wrote what they would like to so much better than they could. This was contemp
Charles Reade (search for this): chapter 5
le Faun, which he read through in a day and calls a wonderful book. Of Adam Bede he says: It is too feminine for a man; too masculine for a woman. He says of Dickens, after reading Barnaby Rudge : He is always prodigal and ample, but what a set of vagabonds he contrives to introduce us to! Barnaby Rudge is certainly the most bohemian and esoteric of Dickens's novels. He liked much better Miss Muloch's John Halifax, --a popular book in its time, but not read very much since. He calls Charles Reade a clever and amusing writer. We find nothing concerning Disraeli, Trollope, or Wilkie Collins. Neither do we hear of critical and historical writers like Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, Carlyle, and Froude. He went, however, to call on Carlyle in England, and was greatly impressed by his conversation. The scope of Longfellow's reading does not compare with that of Emerson or Marian Evans; but the doctors say that every man of forty knows the food that is good for him, and this is true menta
Edward J. Lowell (search for this): chapter 5
l-embracing subject in those days and its members represented every shade of political opinion. Emerson, Longfellow, and Lowell were strongly anti-slavery, but they differed in regard to methods. Lowell was what was then called a Seward man, and diLowell was what was then called a Seward man, and differed with Emerson in regard to John Brown, and with Longfellow in regard to Sumner. Holmes was still more conservative; and Agassiz was a McClellan Democrat. William Hunt, the painter, believed that the war was caused by the ambition of the leadifellow set his glass down with emphasis, and replied: If good manners could not say it, thank heaven bad manners did; and Lowell supported this with some pretty severe criticism of the Union League Club. In justice to the Union League Club, however,minent conservatives with one or two exceptions all lived to the east and north of the college grounds, while Longfellow, Lowell, Doctor Francis (who baptized Longfellow's children), Prof. Asa Gray, and other liberals lived at the west end; and the l
ty knows the food that is good for him, and this is true mentally as well as physically. He refers more frequently to Tennyson than to any other writer, and always in a generous, cordial manner. Of the Idyls of the King he says that the first andouse, he held out a book in his hand and said: Here is some of the finest dramatic poetry that I have ever read. It was Tennyson's Queen Mary; but there were many who would not have agreed with his estimate of it. Rev. Samuel Longfellow considered t and his fine appearance and dignified bearing increased the reputation which had already preceded him. His meeting with Tennyson was considered as important as the visit of the King of Prussia to Napoleon III., and much less dangerous to the peace o It has often been said that Hiawatha does not represent the red man as he really is, and this is true. Neither does Tennyson represent the knights of King Arthur's court as they were in the sixth century A. D. They are more like modern English g
ues, like the Torso of the Belvidere, were objects of aversion to him. Poets and musical composers see more with their ears than they do with their eyes. The single work of art that attracted him strongly at this time was a statue of Venus, by Canova, which he compares to the Venus dea Medici, and his brother Samuel remarks that he was always more attracted by sculpture than painting. Canova was a genius very similar to Longfellow himself, as nearly as an Italian could be made to match an AmCanova was a genius very similar to Longfellow himself, as nearly as an Italian could be made to match an American, and he was then at the height of his reputation. In 1829 Longfellow returned to Portland and was immediately chosen a professor at Bowdoin College, where he remained for the next seven years. When, in 1836, Professor Ticknor retired from his position as instructor of modern languages at Harvard, his place was offered to Longfellow and accepted. This brought him into the literary centre of New England, and one of the first acquaintances he made there was Charles Sumner, who was lectu
ede he says: It is too feminine for a man; too masculine for a woman. He says of Dickens, after reading Barnaby Rudge : He is always prodigal and ample, but what a set of vagabonds he contrives to introduce us to! Barnaby Rudge is certainly the most bohemian and esoteric of Dickens's novels. He liked much better Miss Muloch's John Halifax, --a popular book in its time, but not read very much since. He calls Charles Reade a clever and amusing writer. We find nothing concerning Disraeli, Trollope, or Wilkie Collins. Neither do we hear of critical and historical writers like Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, Carlyle, and Froude. He went, however, to call on Carlyle in England, and was greatly impressed by his conversation. The scope of Longfellow's reading does not compare with that of Emerson or Marian Evans; but the doctors say that every man of forty knows the food that is good for him, and this is true mentally as well as physically. He refers more frequently to Tennyson than to any
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11