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East India (search for this): chapter 1
d an appeal, on the day before one Fourth of July, from a broken-down companion of his boyhood who had led a somewhat questionable life, to go down to East Cambridge jail and release another similar worthy, also a playmate, that he might at least spend Independence Day in freedom. Lowell went promptly and paid the fine, which was very likely assessed over again, and for adequate cause, within forty-eight hours. The element of sailor vagrancy, too, was then far more prominent than now. The East India trade was still a lingering Boston enterprise. Cambridge boys were still sent to sea as a cure for naughtiness, or later as supercargoes, this being a mark of confidence. Groups of sailors sometimes strayed through Cambridge, and there were aromatic smells among the Boston wharves. Lowell in particular had a naval uncle, and he wrote of what had been told from childhood when he said in The Growth of the legend :-- The sailors' night watches are thrilled to the core With the lineal o
Weston, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ish university city, so that the settlement first called Newetowne became in May, 1638, Cambridge, and has thus ever since remained. And so essentially was the college the centre of the whole colony, as well as of the town, that there exists among the manuscripts of the Massachusetts Historical Society a memorandum, dated September 30, 1783, to the effect that in the early days the persons appointed to lay out roads into the interior did it only so far as the bank by Mrs. Biglow's house in Weston, and that this they considered to be quite as far as would ever be necessary, it being about seven miles from the college in Cambridge. Fifty years ago, Cambridge boys knew all this tradition very well; and they knew also that the soul-ravishing Mr. Shepard, after publishing a dozen or so of his books in England, printed the last two upon the press which came to Cambridge in the very year when the town assumed its name. We all knew the romance of the early arrival of this press; that the
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1
ill reposes unpublished in the College Library. His kinsman, Jonathan Sewell (not Sewall), born in Cambridge (1766), became an eminent lawyer and legal writer in Canada, was one of the first to propose Canadian federation, in a pamphlet ( 815), and left a work on The Judicial History of France, so far as it relates to the Law of Canadian federation, in a pamphlet ( 815), and left a work on The Judicial History of France, so far as it relates to the Law of the Province of Lower Canada. The eighteenth century also brought the physical sciences on their conquering course, to Harvard College, displacing the established curriculum of theology and philology; but Professor Goodale has shown that they really came in as a branch of theology, or of what is called pastoral care, since the cLower Canada. The eighteenth century also brought the physical sciences on their conquering course, to Harvard College, displacing the established curriculum of theology and philology; but Professor Goodale has shown that they really came in as a branch of theology, or of what is called pastoral care, since the clergy of that day were also largely the medical advisers of their people and had to be instructed for that function. The first Professor of Mathematics and Philosophy, Isaac Greenwood, was not appointed until 1727; he was followed ( 738) by John Winthrop, who was greatly in advance of the science of the day, and whose two lecture
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ct, in spite of great temptations to the contrary. From these we turned to the humbler tomb of Thomas Longhorn, the town drummer, who died in 1685, aged about 68 years, or of Thomas Fox, whose death was in 1693, and who had a quarter of a century before been ordered by the selectmen to look to the youth in time of public worship, & to inform against such as he find disorderly ; or, perhaps with vague curiosity to that of Jane, a negro servant to Andrew Boardman, who died in 1741, when Massachusetts still held slaves. These larger tombs, by reason of their horizontal position, afforded excellent seats for schoolboys, intent perhaps on exploring the results of their walnutting or chestnutting; or possibly a defiant nap might be there indulged. I have often wished that I had learned from Lowell on which of them he sat during that Hallowe'en night when he watched there vainly for ghosts. Only one of these longer epitaphs was in English; and the frequent Eheu, or O spes inanis,
Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
England psalm book. As originally compiled it had dissatisfied Cotton Mather, who had hoped that a little more of art was to be employed in it, and good Mr. Shepard thus ventured to criticise its original compilers, the Rev. Richard Mather of Dorchester and the Rev. Messrs. Eliot and Welde of Roxbury:-- You Roxb'ry poets, keep clear of the crime Of missing to give us very good rhyme, And you of Dorchester, your verses lengthen But with the text's own words you will them strengthen. PresiDorchester, your verses lengthen But with the text's own words you will them strengthen. Presidents Charles Chauncey and Urian Oakes published a few sermons — the latter offering one with the jubilant title, The Unconquerable, All Conquering and More than Conquering Soldier, which was appropriately produced on what was then called Artillery Election in 1674. President Increase Mather was one of the most voluminous authors of the Puritan period, and from his time (1701) down to the present day there have been few presidents of Harvard University who were not authors. All these men we C
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1
rary. His kinsman, Jonathan Sewell (not Sewall), born in Cambridge (1766), became an eminent lawyer and legal writer in Canada, was one of the first to propose Canadian federation, in a pamphlet ( 815), and left a work on The Judicial History of France, so far as it relates to the Law of the Province of Lower Canada. The eighteenth century also brought the physical sciences on their conquering course, to Harvard College, displacing the established curriculum of theology and philology; but Profns or prisons in Germany and Italy, and finding at last (from 1826 onward) a foothold in Harvard University. Such were Charles Follen, Charles Beck, Pietro Bachi; and to these must be added (1816) that delightful and sunny representative of Southern France, that living Gil Bias in hair-powder and pigtail, Francis Sales. To these was later joined (1847) the attractive and inspiring Louis Agassiz. There were also in Cambridge several private libraries which were, for their period, remarkable;
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ed veterans whom we eyed with reverence, chief of whom was Lowell's Old Joe : Old Joe is gone, who saw hot Percy goad Hig that she should be four in three months. When we read in Lowell's letters of his poring over French stories at seven and othing is more curious than the impression held by some of Lowell's English friends — even, it is said, that most intimate fd by Mr. Norton--that the Hosea Biglow dialect was that of Lowell's father, family, and personal circle. All who know anythtions that the Biglow papers were written. The dialect of Lowell's father and his mates, on the other hand, was only too sc path of steady industry. There is abundant evidence in Lowell's letters and in his printed works of his humorous enjoymewho had been a schoolmate of hers, rather sympathized with Lowell's attack upon her; Lowell's Letters, II. pp. 26, 173. CLowell's Letters, II. pp. 26, 173. Compare Holmes's Life and letters, II. p. 108. but when she criticised Longfellow in the New York Tribune, the latter only me
Menotomy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Governor Winthrop and not for Harry Vane. We read in a book by a Cambridge woman, Mrs. Hannah Winthrop, the horrors of that midnight cry, as she calls it, when all the women and children of Cambridge were awakened by drums and bells on the night before the battle of Lexington; when they were bidden to take refuge at Fresh Pond, away from the redcoats' line of march, and when, after the watchful night was over, they went on foot to Andover, passing the dead bodies that lay in what is now Arlington. It must be remembered that the Cambridge of sixty years ago was not merely that number of years nearer to the great Revolution which made us a nation, but was especially full of its associations. In the old First Church, where Dane Hall now stands,--the present church having been built in 1833,--the First Provincial Congress met, which was presided over by John Hancock, from October 17 to December 10, 1774. Here the Committee of Safety met, November 2, and here, on February 1, 1775,
Oriental (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ry of printing says that the press of Harvard College was, for a time, as celebrated as the press of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge in England. And not merely were the foundations of the town and of the college thus laid in literature, but the early presidents of Harvard were usually selected, not merely for soundness of doctrine,which was not always their strong point,--but for their scholarship and even supposed literary taste. President Dunster, for instance, was an eminent Oriental scholar and performed also the somewhat dubious service of preparing the New England psalm book. As originally compiled it had dissatisfied Cotton Mather, who had hoped that a little more of art was to be employed in it, and good Mr. Shepard thus ventured to criticise its original compilers, the Rev. Richard Mather of Dorchester and the Rev. Messrs. Eliot and Welde of Roxbury:-- You Roxb'ry poets, keep clear of the crime Of missing to give us very good rhyme, And you of Dorchester, you
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 1
h from German universities, had written, absolutely no advantage over the American Cambridge. He wrote to my father from Oxford (June 6, 1818): There is more teaching and more learning in our American Cambridge than there is in both the English universities together, thoa between them they have four times our number of students. Harvard Graduates' Magazine, September, 1897, p. 16. Yet he had, with Cogswell and Ticknor, written letter after letter to show the immeasurable superiority of Gottingen to the little American institution; and his low estimate of the English universities as they were in 1818 is confirmed by those who teach in them to-day. It is fair to say that, provincial as the Cambridge of sixty years ago may have been, it offered at least a somewhat refined provincialism, with the good manners and respectable attainments prevailing at that time. Nothing is more curious than the impression held by some of Lowell's English friends — even, it is said, that most intim
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