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Elmwood, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
y. This could not have been the case had not the residence been fortunate in itself. Multitudes of persons now visit Elmwood every year, and there are few who do not feel its charm. Yet this affords no picture of what the region was in Lowell'sol, but it is probable that his father then resided in Boston, while his elder brother, Charles Russell Lowell, occupied Elmwood. The great and even controlling influence exercised upon Lowell from this time by his betrothed, Maria White, who aftFew letters, I think, were so scintillating as Lowell's; everything that he touched gave out its little electric spark. Elmwood, January to, 1866. My Dear Higginson, I think the best man to write a sketch of Charley for the Libro D'Oro would be t nephews than when he described, at the beginning of his essay On a certain Condescension in foreigners, his walks from Elmwood to Harvard Square about 1870: The war was ended. I might walk townward without that aching dread of bulletins that had
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
of people who are too well known to allow of any other kind of liberties being taken with them. Then follows the letter. The keeper of the station near us is a Mr. S., father of a wonderful boy of whom you may have seen notices. He is an excellent specimen of the Yankee, civil, intelligent, able to write a good account of Secretary C. [Collamer] in our village newspaper, nasal enough, has his own opinions on men and books — opinions on a far higher plane than common. He is from Vermont, knows P.'s [Powers] family wal, and thus confuted to me one day a story he had seen translated from the Italian, to the effect that P. was born in the little hamlet-of Woodstock, inhabited altogether by herdsmen and shepherds. Why, said he, I lived within a stone's chuck oa the haouse he wuz born in. Knew his uncle Dr. P., wal. Still livina. There's five ministers oa the gospil, twelve doctors, and seventeen liars (lawyers) these I know certin, and I guess there's much's forty piano for
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Chapter 5: Lowell of the three authors most widely associated with old Cambridge, only Holmes and Lowell were born there, although its associations became a second nature to Longfellow, who was born in Maine, while that region was still a part of Massachusetts. Lowell felt, even more thoroughly than Holmes, the influence of his Cambridge surroundings, because Holmes went to Europe for his medical training (1833) at the age of twenty-three and never afterward lived in his native town, talth of thought; his prose and verse alike are full of involved periods, conundrums within conundrums. He begins his Moosehead journal with this abstruse and craggy sentence: Thursday, 11th August.--I knew as little yesterday of the interior of Maine as the least penetrating person knows of the inside of that great social millstone which, driven by the river Time, set imperatively a-going the several wheels of our individual activities. He goes on with his rich and delightful gossip, but the
Calcutta (West Bengal, India) (search for this): chapter 5
d high price. It will always have an interest, not merely as Lowell's first serious poetic effort, but as indicating that curious conservatism of his mind — far beyond his father's — which led him to speak with aversion both of Emerson and of the abolitionists, afterward his friends. It gave him, however, a distinct feeling of having tried his wings in song, and of being destined thenceforth to that realm. It was a year or two after this that my elder brother, having lately returned from Calcutta, and having gone promptly to spend an evening with his old friend, came home with an astounding bit of information. Jimmie Lowell, he said,--this being his friend's usual appellation in those days,--thinks he is going to be a poet. The announcement was received by my elders in the family with some disapproval. Cambridge had produced one poet in Oliver Wendell Holmes, but he was also a reputable physician, and relied at that time far more upon his medical than his literary reputation; but
Maria (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
an socially or morally. The How must be left to the care of individual experience. Among the good things of the day, let me thank you for your pamphlet on the Woman question, which I read with great interest; and which is the most compact and telling statement of the case I have seen. We have no intention whatever of going abroad again at present. The climate of Italy, I think, did Mrs. Lowell great good, but she is not well enough now to think of leaving home. I am glad you liked Maria's poem. Two others of hers have been published in Putnam, Necklaces, and The grave of Keats. They are all beautiful, I think, and the greatest pleasure I am capable of is to hear them appreciated. With sincere regard, I remain yours, J. R. Lowell. This was written just two months before Maria Lowell's death, and there does not exist in literature, I think, a more exquisite expression of the possible union between two thoroughly poetic natures. It was, however, a curious influence
Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ing then the Steerforth of the school, joyous, full of life, and variously accomplished. Many a time I have walked up and down what is now Brattle Street, listening reverently to the talk of these older boys, not always profitable, but sometimes most valuable. I remember, for instance, their talking over the plot of Spenser's Faerie Queene years before I had read it, and making it so interesting that we younger urchins soon named a nook with shady apple trees near our bathing place on Charles River the Bower of Blisse. In 1834 Lowell and Story went to college, and my brother afterward to the East Indies, so I was dropped from their circle, except as a boy in a college town watches the works and ways of the students. Both Lowell and Story were popular and socially brilliant in college, but neither gave unmixed satisfaction to the Faculty. Both were of the kind who read old English plays a good deal, and of the rarer number who get some good out of them. Lowell's reputation as
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Chapter 5: Lowell of the three authors most widely associated with old Cambridge, only Holmes and Lowell were born there, although its associations became a second nature to Longfellow, who was born in Maine, while that region was still a part of Massachusetts. Lowell felt, even more thoroughly than Holmes, the influence of his Cambridge surroundings, because Holmes went to Europe for his medical training (1833) at the age of twenty-three and never afterward lived in his native town, though always near it; while Lowell was continuously a Cantabrigian, with only occasionally a few months of absence, until his first diplomatic appointment. Fredrika Bremer told him that he was the only American she had seen whose children were born in the same House with himself; and he was also of the yet smaller number who die in the House of their birth. It would be impossible to say that the Cambridge influence entered more strongly into Lowell than into Holmes, but it was in Lowell's cas
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Cambridge influence entered more strongly into Lowell than into Holmes, but it was in Lowell's case e rarer number who get some good out of them. Lowell's reputation as a wit was established in the eeen ten years earlier in The Collegian, though Lowell's contributions were mainly in prose. After e, in all Mr. Norton's delightful collection of Lowell's correspondence anything quite so thoroughly btedly left no opportunity unused to celebrate Lowell's youthful genius. Lowell's personal populant of human nature in the rapid transition, in Lowell's case, from the writer of decidedly convivialgs to the man addressing, four years later, Lowell's Letters, I. p. 68. the annual meeting of theFew letters, I think, were so scintillating as Lowell's; everything that he touched gave out its lits direction began to show itself very early in Lowell, and I remember that when he began to write inhat English critics, while jealously disputing Lowell's claim to rank in the highest class of poets,[11 more...]
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
w of houses that Lowell walked daily or rode on his little pony to the village post-office; and it was not possible that a child of naturally imaginative turn should escape their influence. It was too soon after the American Revolution — then only fifty years removed — for him to feel any cordial sympathy or envy for the period of hair powder and snuffboxes; but the boy who was already immersing himself in the traditions of English poetry, had the actual form of the British occupation of New England vividly before his eyes. Lowell may have also found, in the garrets of his father's House, such memorials of the confiscation of the estate as in the following account, kept at the height of the great Revolution-- the estate of Thomas Oliver, late of Cambridge, Absentee, to the Committee of correspondence of the town, for the year 1776: Dr. For taking into possession and leasing out said estate£ 2 Also for supporting a negro man belonging to said estate£3.12 For collecting the <
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
hom but Lowell would it have occurred to write by way of illustration, Lord de Roos, long suspected of cheating at cards, would never have been convicted but for the resolution of an adversary, who, pinning his hand to the table with a fork, said to him, blandly, My lord, if the ace of spades is not under your lordship's hand, why then I beg your pardon. It seems to us that a timely treatment of Governor Letcher in the same energetic way would have saved the disasters of Harper's Ferry and Norfolk. And he was one of the first to proclaim publicly, while Mr. Seward was still trying to keep the question of slavery wholly out of the affair: We cannot think that the war we are entering on can end without some radical change in the system of African slavery. . . . The fiery tongues of the batteries in Charleston harbor accomplished in one day a conversion which the constancy of Garrison and the eloquence of Phillips had failed to bring about in thirty years. Such words were half battle
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