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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
d in the Genius of Universal Emancipation at Baltimore, in September, 1829. My conscience is now s, and was at this time (1828) established in Baltimore, where he had recently been assaulted and alo Boston, and at a later date he walked from Baltimore to Bennington, Vermont, where Garrison was eermont and became co-editor of the Genius in Baltimore. Before he migrated to Baltimore, however, Baltimore, however, he visited Boston and there on July 4th, 1829, he delivered an address in the Park Street Church why of the Genius of Universal Emancipation in Baltimore. Inasmuch as Garrison had already received s agreed to sign their articles separately. Baltimore was, at that time, the most northern port inlong before Garrison was thrown into jail in Baltimore as the result of a suit for criminal libel, ed people; that the number of subscribers in Baltimore and Washington exceeds that of those in thisdited by an individual who formerly lived at Baltimore, where his feelings have been exasperated by
Lynn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
rampling Oppression and his iron rod: Such is the vow I take-so help me God! Garrison's early history is the familiar tale of poverty, and reminds one of Benjamin Franklin's boyhood. His mother, a person of education and refinement, was, during Garrison's babyhood, plunged into bitter destitution. He was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1805. At the age of nine, in order to help pay for his board, he was working for Deacon Bartlett in Newburyport. Later, he learned shoemaking at Lynn, cabinet-making at Haverhill, and in 1818, at the age of thirteen, was apprenticed to a printer and newspaper publisher. Now began his true education. He read Scott, Byron, Moore, Pope, and Campbell; and at the age of seventeen, was writing newspaper articles in the style of the day. By the time he was twenty, Garrison was a thoroughgoing printer and journalist; and during the last three years of his apprenticeship he had entire charge of his master's paper. During the next four years, he
Newburyport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Franklin's boyhood. His mother, a person of education and refinement, was, during Garrison's babyhood, plunged into bitter destitution. He was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1805. At the age of nine, in order to help pay for his board, he was working for Deacon Bartlett in Newburyport. Later, he learned shoemaking at LNewburyport. Later, he learned shoemaking at Lynn, cabinet-making at Haverhill, and in 1818, at the age of thirteen, was apprenticed to a printer and newspaper publisher. Now began his true education. He read Scott, Byron, Moore, Pope, and Campbell; and at the age of seventeen, was writing newspaper articles in the style of the day. By the time he was twenty, Garrison was a trader whom he had denounced. The Mr. Todd whom he libeled, and about whom he spoke only the truth, was a fellow townsman of Garrison's, being a native of Newburyport, Mass., and was thus a natural target for Garrison's invective. Garrison remained in jail seven weeks, during which time he conducted a most telling campaign of p
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ome. I shall revert again to the relation between these two young men, both so noble, both of such immense consequence to the country, each of them, in a sense, the father of all of us — whose spirits were raised up by God to shed new life upon America. We must return to Garrison as the coeditor with Lundy of the Genius of Universal Emancipation in Baltimore. Inasmuch as Garrison had already received his revelation as to immediate emancipation, and Lundy favored slower methods, the two par target for Garrison's invective. Garrison remained in jail seven weeks, during which time he conducted a most telling campaign of pamphlets, private letters and public cards, sonnets, letters to editors, etc., with the result that the whole of America heard of the incident. Mr. Arthur Tappan of New York became interested in the case, and secured Garrison's release by paying the fine of one hundred dollars. This was in the spring of 1830. Thus it may be seen that at the time that Garrison
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
n has to interfere, until the intelligent Legislature of Massachusetts can provide a durable remedy for this most appalling grievance .. Robert Y. Hayne of Columbia, S. C., begged Otis to find out whether Garrison had mailed him (Hayne) a copy of the Liberator. Otis obsequiously sent a deputy to question Garrison. This was someto obtain evidence to be used in a criminal prosecution of Garrison. Garrison at once becomes the able constitutional lawyer. The Hon. Robert Y. Hayne of Columbia, S. C., says the Liberator of October 29th, 1831, (through the medium of a letter), wishes to know of the Mayor of Boston, who sent a number of the Liberator to him,ether he sent the aforesaid number to the aforesaid individual. Mr. Garrison (through the medium of his paper) wishes to know of the Hon. Robert Y. Hayne of Columbia, S. C., and the Mayor of Boston, what authority they have to put such questions? We can see in this, as in all the rest of Garrison's activity, the tactician of g
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
8) established in Baltimore, where he had recently been assaulted and almost killed in the streets by Austin Woolfolk, a slave trader. Lundy's practice was to walk from town to town throughout the country, founding Antislavery societies, and introducing his newspaper. He first met Garrison while he was on a visit to Boston, and at a later date he walked from Baltimore to Bennington, Vermont, where Garrison was editing a journal, in order to convert Garrison. He succeeded. Garrison left Vermont and became co-editor of the Genius in Baltimore. Before he migrated to Baltimore, however, he visited Boston and there on July 4th, 1829, he delivered an address in the Park Street Church which is really the beginning of his mission. The Reverend John Pierpont (the grandfather of Pierpont Morgan) was present and wrote a hymn for the occasion. Whittier, a stripling, was also present. The tone and substance of this address are strikingly like those of Emerson's Phi Beta Kappa address (del
Chapter 3: the figure The essential quality of all this old society was that it was cold. In the last analysis,after the historical and constitutional questions have been patiently analyzed, after economics and sociology have had their say,the trouble with the American of 1830 was that he had a cold heart. Cruelty, lust, business interest, remoteness from European influence had led to the establishment of an unfeeling civilization. The essential quality of Garrison is that he is hot. This must be borne in mind at every moment as the chief and real quality of Garrison. Disregard the arguments; sink every intellectual conception, every bit of logic and of analysis, and look upon the age:--you see a cold age. Look upon Garrison:--you see a hot coal of fire. He plunges through the icy atmosphere like a burning meteorite from another planet. There is a second contrast. The age was conciliatory: Garrison is aggressive. These two forms of the contrast between Garrison and his
Bennington, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
dy, the quiet Quaker, had been editing the Genius of Universal Emancipation since 1821, and was at this time (1828) established in Baltimore, where he had recently been assaulted and almost killed in the streets by Austin Woolfolk, a slave trader. Lundy's practice was to walk from town to town throughout the country, founding Antislavery societies, and introducing his newspaper. He first met Garrison while he was on a visit to Boston, and at a later date he walked from Baltimore to Bennington, Vermont, where Garrison was editing a journal, in order to convert Garrison. He succeeded. Garrison left Vermont and became co-editor of the Genius in Baltimore. Before he migrated to Baltimore, however, he visited Boston and there on July 4th, 1829, he delivered an address in the Park Street Church which is really the beginning of his mission. The Reverend John Pierpont (the grandfather of Pierpont Morgan) was present and wrote a hymn for the occasion. Whittier, a stripling, was also pr
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ng it let us remember the shattering, repulsive power which self-assertion exercises over smooth, cold people of good taste, whose worldly fortunes and sincere spiritual beliefs are bound up for all eternity with smoothness, coldness, and good taste. The punctuation and typesetting of the article, and the verses (not his own) at the end of it, may also be noted as indicating Garrison's taste and education: In the month of August, I issued proposals for publishing the Liberator in Washington City; but the enterprise, though hailed in different sections of the country, was palsied by public indifference. Since that time, the removal of the Genius of Universal Emancipation to the Seat of Government has rendered less imperious the establishment of a similar periodical in that quarter. During my recent tour for the purpose of exciting the minds of the people by a series of discourses on the subject of slavery, every place that I visited gave fresh evidence of the fact that a gre
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ry place that I visited gave fresh evidence of the fact that a greater revolution in public sentiment was to be effected in the free States--and particularly in New England--than at the South. I found contempt more bitter, opposition more active, detraction more relentless, prejudice more stubborn, and apathy more frozen, than amles separately. Baltimore was, at that time, the most northern port in the coastwise slave trade: and Garrison constantly saw the slaves being shipped south in New England bottoms. It was not long before Garrison was thrown into jail in Baltimore as the result of a suit for criminal libel, brought by a New England slave trader whNew England slave trader whom he had denounced. The Mr. Todd whom he libeled, and about whom he spoke only the truth, was a fellow townsman of Garrison's, being a native of Newburyport, Mass., and was thus a natural target for Garrison's invective. Garrison remained in jail seven weeks, during which time he conducted a most telling campaign of pamphlets,
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