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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
the South. This is not the fault of the Southerner, for with the possible exception of his lesser fondness for manual labor, he differs in no essential respect from other men of Anglo-Saxon descent, and so far as the race question is concerned, the Northerner who settles in the South is usually the less considerate of the two. But the war absorbed the entire South. Every man and boy took part in it. It devastated the home, and where it did not devastate it impoverished. War was hell in Georgia, where General Sherman learned its character after having created it; and not a mere matter of the morning newspaper, as it was in many a Northern household. It was a matter of necessity that its damning effects should be greatest in the States of the Confederacy. If it is true that a large crop of military schools sprang up in the North, and that much was done to infect the minds of the young with the ideals of militarism, in the South every lad inherited by his birthright the title of
Congo (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
and set a good example to the whites. The Rev. Henry Richards, for many years a missionary on the Congo, writes: I believe the Anglo-Saxon to be naturally far more cruel and brutal than the African. There should be hope then for the latter race. It is to be hoped that there is some truth in the theory of reincarnation, for it affords such grand opportunities for poetic justice. If there is anything in it, the author of The Negro a beast should make his next appearance as a full-blooded Congo black; the author of Leopard's Spots would figure among the mulattos from whom he wishes to save us; and the author of Up from slavery --well — if any man has earned the right to the whitest of skins (if he would like to have one) it is Booker Washington. And if these three gentlemen came on the stage again together, I am confident that we should find the last of the three exerting his powers for the benefit of the other two in a spirit of love to which they are total strangers. And I c
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
imes against women which are his shame, and I have faith that men like Booker Washington can set such a movement on foot. The white clergy of the South have a tremendous responsibility. They have an influence far transcending that of their colleagues in the North. Will they use it like Mr. Dixon and the ministers he creates in his book, to foment misunderstandings and distrust, or to infuse the spirit of Christ into the problem? It is surely discouraging to find the Episcopal bishop of Arkansas, an Ohioan, publicly defending the practice of lynching. We all admit now that the policy of reconstruction was a sad mistake and that Northern interference can do little, but it is still possible to begin a new work of reconstruction based upon human sympathy. If the South will undertake this task, it will escape the battle of the beasts which is otherwise inevitable. Swedenborg somewhere says that the African race is to be the race of love — the race of the future. Let it try to live
William Lloyd Garrison (search for this): chapter 13
We have considered some of the general effects of the Civil War upon the countryeffects which would have been avoided if Garrison's peaceful counsels had prevailed; but many of these evils have been especially concentrated in the South. This is not for slavery, and perhaps I may be pardoned for devoting a chapter to my recollections, believing that they substantiate Garrison's position that gunpowder should have no place in the social pharmacopeia. And first, then, to show that the race questes, Jake was a mean cuss, said Smith, but I liked him first rate. And we finished our buckwheat cakes in silence. If Garrison were alive and could visit the South to-day and read Up from slavery, The leopard's Spots and The Negro a beast, he woule the South can entertain any just expectation of rivaling the North. She is hopelessly handicapped by her mean men. Garrison believed as fully in the abolition of war as in the abolition of slavery. He did not believe in doing evil that good ma
wful nice fellow, but I must say he was a mean one. And then Tom Spear-he was sheriff-he said he'd arrest him if it took him ten years, and Jake, he said he shouldn't. I met Jake in the street one day, and he says to me, says he, Just you tell Tom Spear that I like him first rate, says he; he's done me a lot of good turns and I'd like to do him a good turn, too; but just you tell him that if he tries to grab me I'll shoot him at sight like a dog, I will, says he. Just tell him that. And I tome to go with him, but I wouldn't — not much. I knowed that Jake Hart was a mean man. But he went with three of 'em, and they heard Jake was at Tim Brown's, and they went upstairs and opened the door; and Jake, just as quiet as I am, he shoots Tom Spear dead; and then the next feller shoots Jake right through the chest, and he falls down, but he sits up again and draws a bead on number two, and down he goes, and then he shoots number three, and the fourth man he thought he'd better stay downst
e whites. The Rev. Henry Richards, for many years a missionary on the Congo, writes: I believe the Anglo-Saxon to be naturally far more cruel and brutal than the African. There should be hope then for the latter race. It is to be hoped that there is some truth in the theory of reincarnation, for it affords such grand opportunities for poetic justice. If there is anything in it, the author of The Negro a beast should make his next appearance as a full-blooded Congo black; the author of Leopard's Spots would figure among the mulattos from whom he wishes to save us; and the author of Up from slavery --well — if any man has earned the right to the whitest of skins (if he would like to have one) it is Booker Washington. And if these three gentlemen came on the stage again together, I am confident that we should find the last of the three exerting his powers for the benefit of the other two in a spirit of love to which they are total strangers. And I cannot refrain from adding an
Chapter 11: the results of the war in the South For what can war but endless war still breed? Milton. We have considered some of the general effects of the Civil War upon the countryeffects which would have been avoided if Garrison's peaceful counsels had prevailed; but many of these evils have been especially concentrated in the South. This is not the fault of the Southerner, for with the possible exception of his lesser fondness for manual labor, he differs in no essential respect from other men of Anglo-Saxon descent, and so far as the race question is concerned, the Northerner who settles in the South is usually the less considerate of the two. But the war absorbed the entire South. Every man and boy took part in it. It devastated the home, and where it did not devastate it impoverished. War was hell in Georgia, where General Sherman learned its character after having created it; and not a mere matter of the morning newspaper, as it was in many a Northern household.
n at the date and rubbed my eyes in astonishment. There must be some mistake. The book was printed in the year of Our Lord Igoo! And in one of the greatest cities of the South, too! And what do you suppose is the name of the publishing company which issues this precious work? It is called the American book and Bible house! I turned over the pages of the book. It was an illiterate medley of folly and superstition-an attempt to prove by Scripture that the Negro was not the descendant of Ham, and to show that the serpent in the garden of Eden was a black man! It was just such a book as, if it had been produced by a Negro, would almost have justified despair for his race. It is not remarkable perhaps that a single lunatic should have written such a book, but that a publisher should have been found for it, that commercial success should have been expected from it, that people should buy it and lay it on their Bibles and leave it on their tables to insult the black men who saw it,
fact as we may, a large part of the colored population of the South are our own cousins. The matter of the usual crime committed by Negroes is a frightful one and it will have to be faced, but it is very clear that it has not been faced in the right way. Lynchings, burnings at the stake-and Mr. Dixon depicts one for us — have failed to decrease the number of them. And let us remember that every civilized nation contains solitary brutes who assault and murder women, but that only white Americans still burn at the stake --and that, too, in multitudes. Savagery will not cure savagery, and the tiger cannot tame the leopard. Mr. Dixon seems to see this when he speaks of the mob as a thousandlegged beast, and anticipates with dread the time when there will be a black beast of the same kind to set off against the white beast. He thinks that the permanent display of force by the whites is the best remedy, and forgets, Christian minister though he be, that the efficacy of sympathy and
Pete Bunker (search for this): chapter 13
eared in the distance, and three or four times back it came, until I was in despair. But once again it was slowly blown away, Waitah! Waitah! Waitah! and I heard it no more. It was nearly nine o'clock when I came in to breakfast in the morning and took my seat at a table occupied by two drummers, who were conversing with each other. Tol'able lively night, remarked one of them, whom I shall call Smith. Yes, said I. Who on earth was that man, and what ever became of him? It's Pete Bunker, replied the man. Don't you know Pete? Why, the Bunkers are one of the best families in these parts. The cook found him in the kitchen this morning sitting at the table fast asleep with his head on his arms. He came out of his room for something or other, and couldn't find it again. But Pete don't often get drunk like that. He's a good fellow when he's sober. He's a mean man, though, sometimes, said the other. Do you remember how he shot that nigger Simpson? That was six years
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