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Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
a beina thet's so, cumrades, very logically remarked one of the number, doan't it nat'rally foiler thet the devil ara on the Union side, ana moughtent we 'bout so wall guv it up fur a dade beat 'ter onst! When the rebel army retreated from Murfreesboro, its column came suddenly upon the scout as he was eating his breakfast in an oak opening near the highway. There was no chance of escape or concealment, for the opening was covered with immense trees standing fifteen and twenty feet apart, wthickly around him, but he escaped unhurt! The God to whom he had prayed shielded him, and brought him safely out of the hands of his enemies. In six days, after unparalleled hardships, he reached the Union lines. A few days before I left Murfreesboro, Bible started on another trip into the enemies' lines to establish a chain of spy stations up to Bragg's headquarters. He succeeded in the perilous enterprise, and, when I last heard of him, was pursuing his usual avocation, doing really mor
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
oldiers had unslung and were holding ready to apply to Bible's flanks. Why, ye karn't mean thet! ye karn't mean thet, cunnel! again piteously cried the scout, Wh — wh — whot'll become on the old 'ooman-whot'll become on the cow-brutes? D-n the old woman and the cow-brutes, shouted the officer, riding forward and leaving the new recruit to his fate. And thus Bible marched to the Tullahoma and thus he enlisted in the second regiment of Alabama Infantry. He remained a fortnight at Tullahoma, and while there obtained a correct idea of the number and disposition of the enemies' forces, and brought away with him, in his head, an accurate map of the rebel fortifications. Desertions being frequent, the picket lines had been doubled, and when he was ready to leave, it had become next to impossible to penetrate them. But he was equal to the emergency, and hit upon a bold expedient which proved successful. Restrictions had been laid by the commanding general on the importation o
Richmond, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
d their captain. They were pledged to resist all attacks on the person or property of any of their number, and met frequently in the woods in the vicinity of their homes. This organization secured Bible safety and free expression of opinion till long after Tennessee went out of the Union. In fact, he felt so secure that, in 1862-a year after the State seceded — under the protection of his band of Home Guards, he inaugurated and carried through a celebratior of the fourth of July at Richmond, Tennessee, under the very guns of a rebel regiment then forming in the town. An act of so much temerity naturally attracted the attention of the Confederate authorities, and not long afterward he was roused from his bed one morning, before daybreak, by three hundred armed men, who told him that he was a prisoner, and that all his property was confiscated to the Government. They at once enforced the confiscation act ; and this, he said, taking from his wallet a piece of soiled paper, ara who
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
the boy. He war allers furgettina himself, ana thinkina uv other folk. He war all-all the pride uv my life-him ana Sallybut it pleased the Lord ter tuck him afore me — but only fur a time-only fur a time-'fore long I shill hev him agin-agin — up thar — up thar! His emotion choked his utterance for awhile. When he resumed, he said: At the eend uv a fortn't, trav'lina by night ana sleepina by day, ana livina on the darkies when my fixin's guv out, I got inter the Union lines 'bove Nashville. And what became of your wife and daughter? I asked. Lettle Sally went ter har sister. My wife walked eighty miles ter har father's. He's one on yer quality folk, ana a durned old secesh, but he's got humin nature in him, ana Sally's safe thar. I'se seed har twice ter his house. The old 'un he's know'd on't, but he hain't nuver said a word. Bible's scouting adventures would fill a volume, and read more like a romance of the middle ages than a matter-of-fact history of the pr<
McMinnville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
ate scrip, to effectually raise the spirits; and then the scout, saying, Ye kin reckon on gittina sich brandy, giniral, as wull sot ye up so high ye'll nuver come down agin, walked leisurely out of the rebel lines. Once, while scouting near McMinnville, Bible was captured by a small party of Forrest's cavalry. One of the Confederates knew him, and he was told he must die. Throwing a rope over the limb of a tree, they adjusted it about his neck, and the rebel officer, taking out his watch, sth his watch in his hand. At last, turning suddenly away, he said to his men: Take off the rope! Take him to the general. He may do what he likes with him. I'll be d-d if I'll hang him. Before they reached Forrest's headquarters at McMinnville, they were set upon by a squad of Union cavalry, who rescued the prisoner, captured a half dozen of the privates, and gave the captain a mortal wound in the side. Bible laid him upon the grass, and, taking his head tenderly in his lap, prayed
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
Bible Smith, the East Tennessee scout and spy. No troops in the Union service were more thoroughly patriotic than the Union men of East Tennessee. Mostly of Scotch Irish stock, and often imbued with the most profound and earnest religious sentiEast Tennessee. Mostly of Scotch Irish stock, and often imbued with the most profound and earnest religious sentiment, they united the earnest puritanism of Cromwell's Ironsides to the skill, tact, and daring of the pioneers of the border. These qualities, added to their thorough knowledge of the country, and its inhabitants, and a sort of free masonry which pd the Ohio, in their great work of putting down the rebellion, than William Jehosaphat Smith, better known throughout East Tennessee as Bible Smith from his Scriptural middle name. Smith was one of the middle class of farmers of that mountain region in the vicinity of their homes. This organization secured Bible safety and free expression of opinion till long after Tennessee went out of the Union. In fact, he felt so secure that, in 1862-a year after the State seceded — under the protection
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.17
the side. Bible laid him upon the grass, and, taking his head tenderly in his lap, prayed for him. As the captain turned his eyes to take a last look at the setting sun, he placed the scout's hand against his heart, and saying: I'm going now — I feel at peace — I owe it to you-God bless you for it, may God forever bless you, he uttered a low moan and died. While the rebel forces lay encamped around Chattau nooga, Bible made them a professional visit. For two days, from the top of Lookout Mountain, he looked down on their fortifications. With the works fully mapped in his mind, so that, in his rude way, he could sketch them upon paper, he started, just at nightfall of a murky, stormy day, to make his way northward. Arriving at the house of a pretended friend, he took supper, and retired to sleep in a small room on the ground floor. It was not far from eleven oa clock, and raining and blowing violently, when a light rap came at his window. He got up-he always slept in his clot
Squire Pursley (search for this): chapter 1.17
going with that big canteen? Ter git some bust-head, giniral. Ye knows we karn't live wuthout thet, replied Bible, with affected simplicity. Perhaps you karn't: don't you know it's against regulations. I'll string you up, and give you fifty. Oh, no! ye woan't do thet, I knows, giniral, fur ye's a feller feelina for we pore sogers, said Bible. We karn't live wuthout a leetle ruin; wuthout a leetle, nohow, giniral! Where do you expect to get it? asked the general. Ter Squire Pursley's, said the scout, naming a planter living a few miles outside of the lines. He's got some on the tallest old rye ye uver seed. I knows him. Ana he's the biggest brandy, too, an~ the purtiest nigger gal (rolling his tongue in his mouth and smacking his lips) thar is anywhar round. She's whiter'n ye is, giniral, ana the snuggest piece uv house furnitura as uver wus grow'd. And how do you expect to pass the pickets? asked the standard authority on Tactics. I reckon this wull bru
on, doing really more service to the country than many a star-shouldered gentleman who is talked of now in the newspapers, and may be read of centuries hence in history. If I have outlined his character distinctly, the reader has perceived that he is brave, simple-hearted, outspoken, hospitable, enterprising, industrious, loyal to liberty, earnest in his convictions-though ignorantly confounding names with things — a good husband and father, with a quiet humor which flavors character as Worcester sauce flavors a good dinner, a practical wisdom which trusts in the Lord, but keeps its powder dry, some talent for bragging, and that intensity of nature and disposition to magnify every thing (illustrated in his story and conversation) which leads the Southerner to do nothing by halves, to throw his whole soul into whatever he undertakes, to be, like Jeremiah's figs, if good, very good: if bad, not fit to feed the pigs. Though morally and intellectually superior to the mass of poor Sou
Bible Smith, the East Tennessee scout and spy. No troops in the Union service were more thoroughly patriotic than the Union men of East Tennessee. Mostly of Scotch Irish stock, and often imbued with the most profound and earnest religious sentiment, they united the earnest puritanism of Cromwell's Ironsides to the skill, tact, and daring of the pioneers of the border. These qualities, added to their thorough knowledge of the country, and its inhabitants, and a sort of free masonry which prevailed among the hunted and persecuted Union men of the region made them invaluable as scouts and spies. Among them all none perhaps acquired more renown or accomplished more for the benefit of the Union armies of the Cumberland and the Ohio, in their great work of putting down the rebellion, than William Jehosaphat Smith, better known throughout East Tennessee as Bible Smith from his Scriptural middle name. Smith was one of the middle class of farmers of that mountain region; and had had ve
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