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Scottsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
one of the chaplains at this post, and is laboring with great zeal and efficiency. Brother G. C. Trevillian has been for some months our regular colporter to the hospitals here. There are at least 4,000 sick and wounded, and a few weeks may bring as many more, as this is one of the principal points to which the wounded of the great army near Gordonsville are brought. At Lovingston, in Nelson, the government is establishing hospitals; there are now about a thousand at that point. At Scottsville are several hundred sick and wounded, and about as many at Hillsborough, in Albemarle. I would like to have several additional tract distributers at these several points. Rev. J. C. Hiden, chaplain at Charlottesville, gave me some interesting facts in reference to the hospitals in that town. He represents the men as being very eager to hear the Gospel and to secure religious reading-matter. In Staunton, I found Brother Fry, our colporter, earnestly engaged. His labors have, indee
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
were connected turned out to witness the ceremony. Our informant says he has never looked upon a more lovely and impressive scene. We understand that a protracted meeting is in progress in Colonel Cary's regiment, and that Rev. Andrew Broaddus, of Caroline, is officiating. We hear of another revival in which twelve soldiers professed conversion, five of whom united with the Methodists, four with the Baptists, and the remainder with the Presbyterians. The religious community of the Confederate States ought to feel encouraged by these tokens of the Divine power to put forth still greater efforts in behalf of the spiritual welfare of our army. Fully one-third of the soldiers are destitute of a copy of the New Testament, and of all other religious reading. From Fairfax Court House, Rev. J. M. Carlisle wrote, to a religious paper at Richmond: As chaplain of the Seventh Regiment, South Carolina Volunteers, I desire to return thanks to certain unknown parties, in your city, for a
Lovingston (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e presence and blessing have been enjoyed. Thus far seven have been received into the Church. Rev. J. L. Johnson is one of the chaplains at this post, and is laboring with great zeal and efficiency. Brother G. C. Trevillian has been for some months our regular colporter to the hospitals here. There are at least 4,000 sick and wounded, and a few weeks may bring as many more, as this is one of the principal points to which the wounded of the great army near Gordonsville are brought. At Lovingston, in Nelson, the government is establishing hospitals; there are now about a thousand at that point. At Scottsville are several hundred sick and wounded, and about as many at Hillsborough, in Albemarle. I would like to have several additional tract distributers at these several points. Rev. J. C. Hiden, chaplain at Charlottesville, gave me some interesting facts in reference to the hospitals in that town. He represents the men as being very eager to hear the Gospel and to secure relig
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
fferent Churches, some deacons and official members, even preachers, in the daily and constant habit of drinking whiskey for their health. The chaplain of the Twenty-third North Carolina Regiment writes from the camp between Union Mills and Centreville to the Biblical Recorder: . . . If we ever meet with a defeat in this army, it will be in consequence of drunkenness. Young men that never drank at home are using spirits freely in camp. I fear that while Lincoln may slay his thousands, the on the Potomac, and lose it by drunken officers. We are satisfied that God alone can prevent it. If the battle soon to transpire near Manassas is lost, we shall be satisfied that whiskey whipped our men. Another correspondent writes from Centreville to the Central Presbyterian: There is an appalling amount of drunkenness in our army. Not, I believe, so much among the common soldiers as with the officers, high as well as low. Too many of our generals, and colonels, and majors, and captain
Garysburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ment fairly held its own and made some advance, and that there was at least as much religious zeal in the camps as among the Churches at home. I select only a few extracts from newspaper reports, which illustrate the condition of things during the summer and autumn of 186I. A writer, speaking of the religious services in the Fourth North Carolina Regiment, says: There are four ministers of the Gospel attached to this regiment. Sabbath before last a most solemn service was held at Garysburg. The sacrament of the Lord's Supper was administered to the Christian professors of the regiment. The services were conducted by Rev. Captain Miller, aided by several other clergymen. The thought that it would probably be the last time in which some would participate in the ordinance, and that before another opportunity occurred they might be on the field of battle, affected every mind, and gave great tenderness to the meeting. I have spent, says Rev. W. J. W. Crowder, most of
France (France) (search for this): chapter 9
r distribution among the soldiers. They were gladly received, and are being generally read, and I trust will be a positive good. May the blessing of God be upon those whose gift they are. But there came, soon after the first battle of Manassas, and during the long inactivity which followed it, a period of demoralization which was unequalled by any witnessed during the war. Our people generally thought that this great victory had virtually ended the war—that before the spring England and France would recognize the Confederacy, and the North be forced to acknowledge our independence. Many people at home quit praying and went to speculating in the necessaries of life, coining money out of the sufferings of soldiers and people, and the demoralization soon extended to the army. The vices common to most armies ran riot through our camps. Drunkenness became so common as to scarcely excite remark, and many who were temperate, and some who were even total abstinence leaders at home, fe
Albemarle (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
other G. C. Trevillian has been for some months our regular colporter to the hospitals here. There are at least 4,000 sick and wounded, and a few weeks may bring as many more, as this is one of the principal points to which the wounded of the great army near Gordonsville are brought. At Lovingston, in Nelson, the government is establishing hospitals; there are now about a thousand at that point. At Scottsville are several hundred sick and wounded, and about as many at Hillsborough, in Albemarle. I would like to have several additional tract distributers at these several points. Rev. J. C. Hiden, chaplain at Charlottesville, gave me some interesting facts in reference to the hospitals in that town. He represents the men as being very eager to hear the Gospel and to secure religious reading-matter. In Staunton, I found Brother Fry, our colporter, earnestly engaged. His labors have, indeed, been greatly blessed here and elsewhere. He gave me an interesting account of some
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ad, he had read the unvarnished statement of a Richmond paper, which brought the blush of shame to the friends of the country. He doubted its truth, but after travelling the length of the country he was convinced of its truth, and had arrived at the conclusion that drunkenness was the vice of the country. An army surgeon, writing to the Richmond Dispatch respecting the prevalence of drunkenness in the army, says: I was greatly astonished to find soldiers in Virginia, whom I had known in Georgia as sober, discreet citizens, members of different Churches, some deacons and official members, even preachers, in the daily and constant habit of drinking whiskey for their health. The chaplain of the Twenty-third North Carolina Regiment writes from the camp between Union Mills and Centreville to the Biblical Recorder: . . . If we ever meet with a defeat in this army, it will be in consequence of drunkenness. Young men that never drank at home are using spirits freely in camp. I fear t
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
nd their manly bosoms heaving with sobs of true repentance, I trust, and grasped our hands. And then the sobs were audible as the man of God poured forth his fervent prayers for their conversion and their reunion in heaven. That brother, as well as every one present, will never forget our last Sabbath at that camp. Elder J. J. Hyman, army chaplain, in a letter to the Christian Index, gives the following account of religious exercises in his regiment (Forty-ninth Georgia, in Stonewall Jackson's command) the second week after the battle at Cedar Run: On the following Monday night, after all became quiet, I opened a meeting, as usual, in one of the companies, to have what we call family prayer before retiring to rest. Seeing so many making their way towards where we were singing, after singing one hymn we called on one brother, and then another, to lead in prayer. We had what might be called an old-fashioned prayermeeting, with about six hundred soldiers present. After s
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e the enemy in the field. Good tidings came from many other portions of the army. Scenes like the following became more frequent every week: For more than a week a revival has been in progress among the soldiers stationed at Ashland. Services are held every night in the Baptist church, and the seats set apart for the anxious are frequently wellnigh filled by the soldiers, who are asking for the prayers of God's people. Rev. W. E. Hatcher, of Manchester, preaches every night. At Aquia creek thirty have professed conversion within a few weeks, a number of whom were baptized in the Potomac by Rev. Geo. F. Bagby, a chaplain. The entire regiment with which the converts were connected turned out to witness the ceremony. Our informant says he has never looked upon a more lovely and impressive scene. We understand that a protracted meeting is in progress in Colonel Cary's regiment, and that Rev. Andrew Broaddus, of Caroline, is officiating. We hear of another revival in which t
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