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n at night without the knowledge of the enemy, and without loss either of property or men. This victory was not gained without a vast sacrifice of noble lives on the part of the Confederates. Gen. Lee was supported by some of his ablest Lieutenants, and never did they more gallantly execute the orders of their great chieftain. The following extract from Gen. Lee's official report will give the reader a correct view of the field and the disposition of our forces: The morning of the 13th, his arrangements for attack being completed about nine o'clock, the movement veiled by a fog, he advanced boldly in large force against our right wing. Gen. Jackson's corps occupied the right of our line, which rested on the railroad; Gen. Longstreet's the left, extending along the heights to the Rappahannock, above Fredericksburg. Gen. Stuart, with two brigades of cavalry, was posted on the extensive plain on our extreme right. As soon as the advance of the enemy was discovered through
atch the zeal of this good man, and went away resolved to work for a revival. This pious man was not permitted to participate in the revival which he so feelingly predicted. He was soon called to the spirit world, and from his home among the blessed looked down upon the glorious scenes of salvation among the soldiers whom he loved so ardently, and for whom he prayed with a faith strong and unfaltering. A General Association of Chaplains and Missionaries had been formed in this army in August of this year (1863), but the subsequent movements interfered greatly with its complete organization, and it was not until November following that it was properly reorganized and made really efficient. Rev. Dr. McDonald, President of Lebanon University, was the President, and Rev. Walborn Mooney, of the Tennessee Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, was the Secretary. The proceedings of this Association Mr. Browning supposes were lost in the subsequent reverses of the army, and he
October 29th (search for this): chapter 16
the soil of Virginia. The unfortunate General McClellan fell under the ban of his government, and was superseded by General Burnside. The Federal army moved slowly southward from the Potomac to the Rappahannock, while the Confederates made a corresponding march through the Valley of Virginia, crossed the Blue Ridge, and placed themselves on the south side of the last named river. We quote from the notes of Rev. J. W. Mills, who fully participated in all the hardships of the army: October 29th.-Orders just received from headquarters to cook two days rations, and be in readiness to march in the morning at an early hour. All is anxiety — no one knows whither we are to move. Are we to cross the Potomac and attack the Yankees? Or are we to go southwards to some point of railroad communication with home and friends? These are questions of importance to us. I hear men saying: Well, I will go anywhere I am ordered. In this long march many of the soldiers suffered greatly for wa
October 31st (search for this): chapter 16
are permitted to pick their way through the rocks as best they can. The feelings of our people in the Valley, as they saw the troops move on with the head of the column filing off towards the mountains, were very sad. As we marched through Winchester the band played Old Folks at Home. We saw ladies, young and old, looking oh with sad faces, many of them weeping. Could we have spoken to these sorrowing ones, we would have said, Be not alarmed, Stonewall Jackson is somewhere. Friday, October 31st.-In lines and off at 7 o'clock. Many are limping with blistered feet and swollen joints. The barefooted stood the march better than those whose shoes were not a good fit. Many are carrying their shoes in their hands to-day. The Shenandoah river is to wade this morning, and we are anxious to get to it, hoping that the water will be some relief to scalded and burning feet. Some stripped their feet and legs, others plunged in with shoes and socks on. The water was almost freezing cold
n the revival which he so feelingly predicted. He was soon called to the spirit world, and from his home among the blessed looked down upon the glorious scenes of salvation among the soldiers whom he loved so ardently, and for whom he prayed with a faith strong and unfaltering. A General Association of Chaplains and Missionaries had been formed in this army in August of this year (1863), but the subsequent movements interfered greatly with its complete organization, and it was not until November following that it was properly reorganized and made really efficient. Rev. Dr. McDonald, President of Lebanon University, was the President, and Rev. Walborn Mooney, of the Tennessee Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, was the Secretary. The proceedings of this Association Mr. Browning supposes were lost in the subsequent reverses of the army, and hence we are cut off from most reliable information concerning the progress of the revival. The seeds of truth were sown by such
December 31st (search for this): chapter 16
that have distinguished the eventful and glorious campaign of the year just closing, give assurance of hope that the guidance of the same Almighty hand, the coming year, will be no less fruitful of events that will insure the safety, peace, and happiness of our beloved country, and add new lustre to the already imperishable name of the Army of Northern Virginia. R. E. Lee, General. Of the battle of Murfreesboro, which closed this eventful year, General Bragg wrote on the night of December 31: The bloodiest day of the war has closed. At seven in the morning the Confederates attacked the Federal lines and, after ten hours hard fighting, took them at every point except on the extreme left, where they were successfully resisted. The vast numbers and resources of the Federals prevented us from seizing the fruits of this victory, and General Bragg in his dispatch said: Unable to dislodge the enemy from his entrenchments. and hearing of reinforcements to him, I withdrew from his
Chapter 15: winter of 1862-63. The battle of Sharpsburg was followed by a series of movements which brought both armies face to face again on the soil of Virginia. The unfortunate General McClellan fell under the ban of his government, and was superseded by General Burnside. The Federal army moved slowly southward from the Potomac to the Rappahannock, while the Confederates made a corresponding march through the Valley of Virginia, crossed the Blue Ridge, and placed themselves on the soueplied, I will not. Then we will send you to Washington. Very well, sir. Appear before me tomorrow morning prepared to go. Mr. Smith appeared; but the captain and his counsellors, it appears, had thought better of the matter. The winter of 1862 was ushered by the repulse of the Federals at Fredericksburg, and the year was closed by the battle of Murfreesboro and the frightful slaughter at Stone river. The movement against Fredericksburg was the fourth attempt to reach Richmond. General
December 31st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 16
ey were cared for. The victory of Fredericksburg was achieved with a small loss in point of numbers on the part of the Confederates; but among the honored dead there were many who yielded up their lives in joyful hope of a better life. Gen. Lee congratulated the army in the following general order, which, like all the utterances of that unequalled soldier and humble Christian, breathes the spirit of a true faith in God: General orders, no. 138:Headquarters Army of Northern Va., December 31, 1862. 1. The General Commanding takes this occasion to express to the officers and soldiers of the army his high appreciation of the fortitude, valor, and devotion displayed by them, which, under the blessing of Almighty God, have added the victory of Fredericksburg to the long lists of triumphs. An arduous march, performed with celerity under many disadvantages, exhibited the discipline and spirit of the troops, and their eagerness to confront the foe. The immense army of the enem
Chapter 15: winter of 1862-63. The battle of Sharpsburg was followed by a series of movements which brought both armies face to face again on the soil of Virginia. The unfortunate General McClellan fell under the ban of his government, and was superseded by General Burnside. The Federal army moved slowly southward from thefor whom he prayed with a faith strong and unfaltering. A General Association of Chaplains and Missionaries had been formed in this army in August of this year (1863), but the subsequent movements interfered greatly with its complete organization, and it was not until November following that it was properly reorganized and made M. E. Church, South, who labored as a missionary in this army, has furnished us an account of the work in his own and other corps during the winter and spring of 1863-‘64. Beginning his work in Gen. Gist's brigade, and aided by Rev. F. Auld, Rev. A. J. P. De Pass, and other zealous chaplains, he soon witnessed scenes that fille
January, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 16
loss of one-fourth of their number in killed, wounded, and missing, Gen. Bragg wisely determined to fall back behind Duck river, and rest his wearied army. The headquarters of the army were subsequently established at Tullahoma, thirty-eight miles from the fatal field of Murfreesboro. It was now that the signs of that wonderful revival in the army of the West began to appear. I shall never forget, says Rev. W. H. Browning, the look of astonishment in the Association of Chaplains in January, 1863, when Bro. Winchester, a chaplain and a minister in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, announced a conversion in his command, and stated that he believed we were on the eve of one of the most glorious revivals ever witnessed on the American continent! His countenance glowed with an unearthly radiance, and while he spoke our hearts burned within us. He urged us to look for it-pray for it-preach for it. A revival in the army! The thing was incredible. And yet, while we listened to th
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