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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War. Search the whole document.

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Melita (Malta) (search for this): chapter 2
t, they spake with tongues and magnified God. Thus, at the headquarters of the Italian band at Caesarea was the first Church of Gentile converts established. Centurion Julius, of Augustus' band, under whose charge Paul was sent to Rome, was a kind-hearted, gallant soldier, if not a Christian; for he entreated the Apostle courteously, and gave him liberty, when they touched at Sidon, to go unto his friends and refresh himself. And when Paul and his companions were shipwrecked on the island of Malta, another soldier, whose name was Publius, the chief man, or governor, received them and lodged them three days courteously. It was doubtless under a deep sense of this man's kindness that St. Paul prayed for his sick father, and laid his hands on him and healed him. In every age of the Church since, soldiers have been found among the most zealous and devoted followers of the Redeemer. When Christianity was made popular by the example and patronage of Roman Emperors, of course tho
Bristol (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
his arms, he would exclaim, This is nothing but the hand of God. He taught his soldiers to regard themselves as the instruments of God's glory and their country's good. In the great revival which prevailed in England under the preaching of Whitefield, the Wesleys, and their associates, godly soldiers bore a conspicuous part. And in America, no lay preacher was more zealous and successful than Captain Thomas Webb, of the British army. Converted under the preaching of John Wesley at Bristol, England, he soon began to recommend in public the grace which had renewed his own heart. Afterwards in America he preached with great fervor, and as he always appeared before the people in his military dress, he attracted large crowds, and many of his hearers felt the power of the gospel proclaimed by this soldier of the Cross. The name of Col. Gardiner is like ointment poured forth. Wild and profligate in early life, he strove, after his conversion, to make some amends for his sinful care
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
e Bible as a revelation from Heaven. On the other hand, the patient endurance of hardships, toil, and all manner of privation by a people whom they had been educated to look upon as voluptuous, tyrannical, and effeminate, by reason of their peculiar institutions, must have filled them with astonishment, if not with admiration. The leading public journal of the world thus described the impression made on the European mind by the attitude of the Southern people: The people of the Confederate States have made themselves famous. If the renown of brilliant courage, stern devotion to a cause, and military achievements almost without a parallel, can compensate men for the toil and privations of the hour, then the countrymen of Lee and Jackson may be consoled amid their sufferings. From all parts of Europe, from their enemies as well as from their friends, from those who condemn their acts as well as those who sympathize with them, comes the tribute of admiration. When the history
Chersonesus (Ukraine) (search for this): chapter 2
see how a Christian could die. He sleeps on the field of his fame, and his lonely tomb, beneath the tropical grove, is hung round with unfading laurels, and never will the Christian traveller or soldier pass it without dropping one tear to him who sleeps beneath. Hedley Vicars was an excellent Christian soldier. In the midst of the dangers attending the hard service in the Crimea he was as peaceful and happy as if reposing quietly with his friends at home. In one of his letters from Sebastopol he says to his sister: It is six months since I have been in reach of a house of prayer, or have had an opportunity of receiving the sacrament; yet never have I enjoyed more frequent or precious communion with my Saviour than I have found in the trenches, or in the tent. When, I should like to know, could we find the Saviour more precious than when the bullets are falling around like hail? Again he writes: I have often heard it said, the worse man, the better soldier. Facts contradict t
h admiration. The leading public journal of the world thus described the impression made on the European mind by the attitude of the Southern people: The people of the Confederate States have made themselves famous. If the renown of brilliant courage, stern devotion to a cause, and military achievements almost without a parallel, can compensate men for the toil and privations of the hour, then the countrymen of Lee and Jackson may be consoled amid their sufferings. From all parts of Europe, from their enemies as well as from their friends, from those who condemn their acts as well as those who sympathize with them, comes the tribute of admiration. When the history of this war is written the admiration will doubtless become deeper and stronger, for the veil which has covered the South will be drawn away, and disclose a picture of patriotism, of unanimous self-sacrifice, of wise and firm administration, which we can now only see indistinctly. The details of that extraordin
France (France) (search for this): chapter 2
m and healed him. In every age of the Church since, soldiers have been found among the most zealous and devoted followers of the Redeemer. When Christianity was made popular by the example and patronage of Roman Emperors, of course thousands of all classes flocked to her standard; but history also shows that every rise of the pure faith in ages of superstition and ignorance, every genuine revival, has been sustained and helped forward by military men. Among the Reformers in Germany, in France, and in England, there were devout soldiers, who wielded the sword of the Spirit as valiantly against the enemies of the Lord as they did the sword of war against the enemies of their country. Whatever some may think of Oliver Cromwell, there is no doubt that he was a devout and earnest Christian, and that there was much sound religion among his invincible Ironsides. He talks of experimental religion as no man could who had not felt its inward and renewing power. After a number of fruit
America (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 2
egard themselves as the instruments of God's glory and their country's good. In the great revival which prevailed in England under the preaching of Whitefield, the Wesleys, and their associates, godly soldiers bore a conspicuous part. And in America, no lay preacher was more zealous and successful than Captain Thomas Webb, of the British army. Converted under the preaching of John Wesley at Bristol, England, he soon began to recommend in public the grace which had renewed his own heart. Afterwards in America he preached with great fervor, and as he always appeared before the people in his military dress, he attracted large crowds, and many of his hearers felt the power of the gospel proclaimed by this soldier of the Cross. The name of Col. Gardiner is like ointment poured forth. Wild and profligate in early life, he strove, after his conversion, to make some amends for his sinful career by his zeal and devotion in the cause of Christ. His full influence for good only the f
Israel (Israel) (search for this): chapter 2
o man, neither accuse any falsely; and be content with your wages. Thus from the beginning did the men of war receive the truth. Was it not a Centurion, a Roman captain of a hundred men, that gave that simple and beautiful illustration of his faith as he kneeled before the Saviour praying for his servant? How pure must have been his life, and how clear and strong his faith, to bring from our Lord that high commendation, Verily, I say unto you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel. We cannot forget that amidst the darkness and horror of the crucifixion conviction seized the heart of another Roman soldier, and while the Jews derided the suffering Christ, he exclaimed, Truly, this man was the son of God. It was in the house of Cornelius of the Italian band, a devout man, that feared God with all his house, who gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God always, that the gospel message was opened to the heathen world. To this godly soldier an angel was sent to
Christian (search for this): chapter 2
also shows that every rise of the pure faith in ages of superstition and ignorance, every genuine revival, has been sustained and helped forward by military men. Among the Reformers in Germany, in France, and in England, there were devout soldiers, who wielded the sword of the Spirit as valiantly against the enemies of the Lord as they did the sword of war against the enemies of their country. Whatever some may think of Oliver Cromwell, there is no doubt that he was a devout and earnest Christian, and that there was much sound religion among his invincible Ironsides. He talks of experimental religion as no man could who had not felt its inward and renewing power. After a number of fruitless efforts against the Royalists, he determined to rally men of religion to his cause, convinced that with a set of poor tapsters and town apprentice people he could never overcome the forces of the King. With these men of religion he always conquered. They marched into battle singing psalms a
Cornelius (search for this): chapter 2
ed before the Saviour praying for his servant? How pure must have been his life, and how clear and strong his faith, to bring from our Lord that high commendation, Verily, I say unto you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel. We cannot forget that amidst the darkness and horror of the crucifixion conviction seized the heart of another Roman soldier, and while the Jews derided the suffering Christ, he exclaimed, Truly, this man was the son of God. It was in the house of Cornelius of the Italian band, a devout man, that feared God with all his house, who gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God always, that the gospel message was opened to the heathen world. To this godly soldier an angel was sent to assure him that his prayers and his alms had come up for a memorial before God. On him, his family, and his devout soldiers, the Holy Ghost fell while Peter preached, and like as it was on the day of Pentecost, they spake with tongues and magnified God. Thus,
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