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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Rosser, D. D., of the Virginia Conference, to take the place of Rev. Dr. James E. Evans, whose health had failed, in General Ewell's corps in the Army of Northern Virginia. In midsummer of this year (1863) the people of the South were again called by the President of the Confederacy to observe a day of fasting and prayer. He issued the following proclamation: Again do I call upon the people of the Confederacy — a people who believe that the Lord reigneth, and that his overruling Providence ordereth all things — to unite in prayer and humble submission under his chastening hand, and to beseech his favor on our suffering country. It is meet that when trials and reverses befall us we should seek to take home to our hearts and consciences the lessons which they teach, and profit by the self-examination for which they prepare us. Had not our successes on land and sea made us self-confident and forgetful of our reliance on him; had not love of lucre eaten like a gangrene into t
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
in the woods since the meeting. Is not this glorious news? Oh! how thankful we ought to be to our Heavenly Father for his great loving kindness and mercy to the children of men. I never saw more zealous workers in the cause of Christ than C. and J. C. They are full of the Spirit, and can talk and think of nothing else. The work went on not only in the camps and along the rear lines, but even in the trenches on the very edge of battle. On Sunday evening, writes a soldier from near Fredericksburg, we had a very interesting little meeting in the trenches. It began with some of the battalion singing. One by one the different regiments collected around and joined in. Soon it was turned into a prayer-meeting, and it proved to be one of the most interesting scenes I had witnessed for a long time. In the 14th South Carolina regiment a Christian Association was formed for the purpose, as the Constitution declared, of being helpers of each other's joy in Christ, and laborers togeth
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ts of the army. Rev. R. G. Porter, chaplain of the 10th Mississippi regiment, Bragg's army, says: It makes my very soul happy to witness the manifestations of God's saving power as seen here in the army — from ten to forty at the altar of prayer-have preaching every day when not hindered by the men being called off. The Rev. Dr. Palmer, of New Orleans, preached with power and love, and under his word the revival deepened. Rev. C. W. Miller, army missionary, writes of the work in Georgia, Gen. D. H. Hill's corps: Since I arrived here as missionary I have been engaged every night in religious services with the soldiers. A revival and extensive awakening have been in progress in General Bate's brigade for four weeks. Every night the altar is crowded with weeping penitents. Several have been happily converted. To me it is the most interesting sight of my life. You cannot look upon these penitent, weeping men at the altar of prayer without thinking of the bloody fiel
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
on Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. The field of conflict was now full of startling events. General Lee made his grand movement into Pennsylvania, which culminated in the terrible battle of Gettysburg. From East Tennessee to Texas the different armies on both sides displayed unusual activity. There was but little time for religious services, but on every suitable occasion they were held, and much fruit was gathered even from fields soaking in blood. The following scene will show with what true heroism our Christian soldiers met death: In the retreat of our army from Middle Tennessee one of the soldiers, says Dr. W. A. Mulkey, a surgeon in the army, was struck by an unexploded shell, the ponderous mass sweeping away his right arm and leaving open the abdominal cavity, its contents falling upon his saddle. In a moment he sank from his horse to the ground, but soon revived, and for two hours talked with as much calmness and sagacity
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ps: Since I arrived here as missionary I have been engaged every night in religious services with the soldiers. A revival and extensive awakening have been in progress in General Bate's brigade for four weeks. Every night the altar is crowded with weeping penitents. Several have been happily converted. To me it is the most interesting sight of my life. You cannot look upon these penitent, weeping men at the altar of prayer without thinking of the bloody fields of Perryville and Murfreesboro, and the victorious veterans rolling up to heaven the shouts of triumph. Here they are. Some sending up the note of a more glorious victory-others charging through the columns of the foe to take the kingdom of heaven by force. From James' Island, near Charleston, a pious captain of a Georgia regiment writes: Since our chaplain came we have had a gracious revival. Many souls have been converted, and many added to the Church. And many of those who had grown cold have been reviv
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 20
efeat, and that, whether in victory or defeat, our humble supplications are due at his footstool. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of these Confederate States, do issue this, my proclamation, setting apart Friday, the 21st day of August ensuing, as a day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer; and I do hereby invite the people of the Confederate States to repair on that day to their respective places of public worship, and to unite in supplication for the favor and protection of that God who has hitherto conducted us safely through all the dangers that environed us. In faith whereof I have hereunto set my hand and the seal of the ConfederConfederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. The field of conflict was now full of startling events. General Lee made his grand movement into Pennsylvania, which culminated
Vernon (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
in Mississippi; while Bishop Pierce, Dr. A. L. P. Green, and Rev. J. E. Evans, went to Gen. Lee's army in Virginia. Rev. Dr. Kavanaugh was sent to the army of General Price, and Rev. Mr. Marvin (now Bishop) was directed by Bishop Pierce to take position as missionary with any army corps west of the Mississippi. The work of these ministers, with that of other zealous men from sister Churches, gave a great impulse to the revival. In Colonel Colquitt's 46th Georgia regiment, camped near Vernon, Miss., the work was powerful, and great numbers were converted. Last night, says Rev. T. C. Stanley, there were about eighty presented themselves for prayer, kneeling upon the ground. The Christian heart could not but be touched while witnessing such a scene. We were under the tall spreading oaks of the forest, and the moon bathing all with its gentle beams, typical of the Spirit that was in mercy sent down from above, enveloping us as with a garment of love, cheering the heart of the Chris
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
he favor and protection of that God who has hitherto conducted us safely through all the dangers that environed us. In faith whereof I have hereunto set my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. The field of conflict was now full of startling events. General Lee made his grand movement into Pennsylvania, which culminated in the terrible battle of Gettysburg. From East Tennessee to Texas the different armies on both sides displayed unusual activity. There was but little time for religious services, but on every suitable occasion they were held, and much fruit was gathered even from fields soaking in blood. The following scene will show with what true heroism our Christian soldiers met death: In the retreat of our army from Middle Tennessee one of the soldiers, says Dr. W. A.
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Chapter 19: summer of 1863. After the great victory of Chancellorsville, the Confederate army lay along the south side of the Rappahannock, watching the movements of the Federals, who held the opposite side of that river. But few military movements of importance were undertaken for some weeks, and this period of repose and re-organization was well-improved by the zealous Christian workers in the army. The fervor of the revival was even greater after the battle than before; in almost every regiment the reports of chaplains and colporteurs were most encouraging. Rev. W. E. Jones, chaplain of the 22d Georgia regiment, wrote: The Lord is in our midst. Ever since the last great victory God has been pouring out upon this regiment his Spirit, almost without measure, and many have been converted, and forty-five have joined different branches of the Church, and there is a host of mourning souls. They rush to the altar by scores. The work is prospering throughout our enti
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
e town every few days it is doubtful whether we will have a quorum. The spreading revival called for all the workers that could be supplied from the home work. Bishop Early, of the M. E. Church, South, appointed Rev. J. N. Andrews, of the North Carolina Conference, a missionary to the soldiers in North Carolina, and the Rev. Leonidas Rosser, D. D., of the Virginia Conference, to take the place of Rev. Dr. James E. Evans, whose health had failed, in General Ewell's corps in the Army of NorthNorth Carolina, and the Rev. Leonidas Rosser, D. D., of the Virginia Conference, to take the place of Rev. Dr. James E. Evans, whose health had failed, in General Ewell's corps in the Army of Northern Virginia. In midsummer of this year (1863) the people of the South were again called by the President of the Confederacy to observe a day of fasting and prayer. He issued the following proclamation: Again do I call upon the people of the Confederacy — a people who believe that the Lord reigneth, and that his overruling Providence ordereth all things — to unite in prayer and humble submission under his chastening hand, and to beseech his favor on our suffering country. It is mee
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