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Cumming's Point (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
hich makes it a red-letter day in the history of that city. No person who was there can ever forget the scenes. For hours before the eastern sky was streaked with the first gray tints of morning the cold night air was rent by other sounds than the joyous peals from the belfry and the exploding crackers of exhilarated boys. At one o'clock A. M. the enemy opened fire upon the city. Fast and furiously were the shells rained upon the city from five guns-three at Battery Gregg, one at Cummings' Point, and one at the Mortar Battery. The shelling was more severe than upon any former occasion, the enemy generally throwing from three to five shells almost simultaneously. Our batteries promptly and vigorously replied to the fire, but without their usual effect in checking the bombardment, which was steadily maintained by the Yankees during the remainder of the night and all the following morning until about half-past 12 o'clock. Up to that hour no less than 134 shells had been hurled a
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
velty; but, after two years hard service, the romance of the soldier's life wore off, and a more sober and serious mood seemed to prevail in our camps. The first decided revival that occurred under my observation and ministry was in the State of Mississippi, to which State I had followed General Price's army, while we were encamped near Tupelo. Here we kept up nightly meetings for several weeks in our camp, and there were some forty conversions or more. Bros. Bennett, Harris, and myself, he J. B. McFerrin, C. W. Miller, W. Mooney, R. P. Ransom, and W. Burr in the Army of Tennessee; J. S. Lane and E. B. Duncan in the Department of Florida; J. J. Wheat and H. J. Harris in Mississippi; W. C. Johnson to General S. D. Lee's corps, North Mississippi; J. J. Hutchinson to army about Mobile; and beyond the Mississippi river, J. C. Keener to Louisiana troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besides these, and others probably whose names have escaped
Pleasant Hill (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
g my horse, and arrived in Gen. Price's camp early in October. My first work was to organize all the chaplains and missionaries into an Association for mutual aid and cooperation. When we went into camp at Camp Bragg, 30 miles west of Camden, we there commenced our work in earnest. Through the winter of 1863-64 we kept up our meetings in camp, had seats and pulpit prepared, and were successful in having more than one hundred conversions. After the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, in Louisiana, our armies returned to Arkansas and made an encampment at a place called Three-Creeks, on the southern line of the State of Arkansas. Here I commenced preaching on the 10th of June, 1864, and continued our meetings until the 10th of September. An extensive revival commenced within a few days after our meeting commenced, and grew in interest-and power to the close. We had preaching, beginning at early candle-light-or rather pine-knot fires on stands around the preaching-place.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
buildings on Broad and Church streets, the loss being about $150,000. The work of the chaplains in winter quarters went on earnestly, and prepared the way for the extraordinary work of grace which blessed the armies in the last year of the war. From the army at Dalton, Ga., now under command of General Joseph E. Johnston, there came an earnest call for Testaments and Bibles. A soldier showed me. says Rev. S. M. Cherry, a Testament a few days ago that he had brought from his home in Tennessee, and had carried in his side-pocket for over two years. Another solicited a Bible, saying that just before he left Missionary Ridge he found part of an old Bible and read it, and was now desirous of getting the entire volume of inspiration. Often I am approached by the soldiers, who inquire, Parson, is there no chance to get a Bible. I am very anxious to procure a copy, and am willing to pay any price for a pocket-Bible. We are unable to supply one-fourth of the demand for the Scripture
Granada (Spain) (search for this): chapter 22
vice, the romance of the soldier's life wore off, and a more sober and serious mood seemed to prevail in our camps. The first decided revival that occurred under my observation and ministry was in the State of Mississippi, to which State I had followed General Price's army, while we were encamped near Tupelo. Here we kept up nightly meetings for several weeks in our camp, and there were some forty conversions or more. Bros. Bennett, Harris, and myself, held a profitable meeting near Granada, Miss., where we had some conversions; but for a length of time the army was kept in motion so constantly that we had but little opportunity for religious services. When the army retreated from Big Black into Vicksburg Bros. Bennett, Patterson, and myself, rode together into that devoted city. The regiment to which I was then chaplain had been captured at Big Black, and as I had no duties to perform, I told those brethren that I should make my escape from the city before the enemy's lines
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
eorgia brigade, and at the session of 1863 the work was begun by sending seven ministers: R. B. Lester to Jackson's brigade, Army of Tennessee; A. M. Thigpen to Colquitt's brigade, near Charleston; J. W. Turner to the troops in and around Savannah, and on the coast below there; G. W. Yarbrough to Wofford's brigade, Gen. Longstreet's army; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Aermons, distributed 300 papers, 18,000 pages of tracts, and about 32,000 pages of reading matter in books, which he had procured by soliciting donations. Some have been awakened, others professed conversion. Rev. J. W. Turner, in and near Savannah, Ga.: He preached in January 16 sermons, travelled about 400 miles, distributed 177 books, conversed privately with several soldiers on religion, and prayed with 102 soldiers who professed to be seeking Christ. Rev. A. M. Thigpen labored
Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
. alone. I obtained leave of absence and made my escape by riding all night alone, and found myself outside of Grant's lines the next morning, and went into Selma, Ala., where I spent the summer. I requested Bishop Paine to give me a commission as a missionary to Gen. Price's army, which was then in Arkansas. I obtained it, and left the house of Robert A. Baker, my cousin, in Alabama, on the 15th of September, 1863. I succeeded in making the trip, crossing the Mississippi, just below Bolivar, swimming my horse, and arrived in Gen. Price's camp early in October. My first work was to organize all the chaplains and missionaries into an Association for mutual aid and cooperation. When we went into camp at Camp Bragg, 30 miles west of Camden, we there commenced our work in earnest. Through the winter of 1863-64 we kept up our meetings in camp, had seats and pulpit prepared, and were successful in having more than one hundred conversions. After the battles of Mansfield and P
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
r quarters went on earnestly, and prepared the way for the extraordinary work of grace which blessed the armies in the last year of the war. From the army at Dalton, Ga., now under command of General Joseph E. Johnston, there came an earnest call for Testaments and Bibles. A soldier showed me. says Rev. S. M. Cherry, a Testameelic from the battle-field on which he died, it is sent back to give comfort and light to his comrades who still struggle for liberty and right. Of his work at Dalton Dr. McFerrin says in a letter to the Southern Christian Advocate: Since I last wrote to you I have visited some of the hospitals, and preached in several pe Church of God. We give the applicants choice of Churches and receive them into various Christian organizations-different divisions, but one grand army. From Dalton, Feb. 3, Rev. A. D. McVoy sent good tidings: We have a large Brigade church built, in which we have been holding services for two weeks. About ten days ago
Selma (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
The regiment to which I was then chaplain had been captured at Big Black, and as I had no duties to perform, I told those brethren that I should make my escape from the city before the enemy's lines were thrown around us, and requested them to join me. Bro. B. refused, saying he should stick to his men; and P. refused to leave 13. alone. I obtained leave of absence and made my escape by riding all night alone, and found myself outside of Grant's lines the next morning, and went into Selma, Ala., where I spent the summer. I requested Bishop Paine to give me a commission as a missionary to Gen. Price's army, which was then in Arkansas. I obtained it, and left the house of Robert A. Baker, my cousin, in Alabama, on the 15th of September, 1863. I succeeded in making the trip, crossing the Mississippi, just below Bolivar, swimming my horse, and arrived in Gen. Price's camp early in October. My first work was to organize all the chaplains and missionaries into an Association for
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
to comfort and save in their helpless and suffering condition. A young wife and mother, whose husband was in prison, wrote to one of the leading papers urging prayer for our captive soldiers, that they might have strength to bear up under their trials, and that God would remove the obstacles to a speedy exchange of prisoners. Never did men need more the consolations of religion than those who on both sides were held as prisoners of war. The winter of 1864 was extremely severe. At Cairo, Ill., the mercury, near the last of January, stood at 15 degrees below zero. At St. Louis it was at 25 below zero, and the river was crossed by heavy wagons on the solid ice. At Chicago the guards at Camp Douglass had to be changed every 30 minutes to prevent freezing, but were all frost-bitten in this short time The Times of that city said of the condition of the prisoners: The suffering and tortures endured by the prisoners was beyond the power of pen to portray. Unaccustomed to
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