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Roanoke (United States) (search for this): chapter 26
urs after the departure of the government Richmond was in flames, and all the hopes of the Southern Confederacy were consumed in one day, as a scroll in the fire. In the midst of the awful conflagration the Federal troops marched in and gazed upon the funeral pile of Southern hopes. In the meanwhile General Lee, with the remnant of his army, was struggling through deep and miry roads towards Farmville. He hoped to be able to reach Danville and establish a new defensive line along the Roanoke and Dan rivers, but the Federals, fresh and well-equipped, moving rapidly with heavy cavalry forces by parallel roads on his left, cut off that line of retreat, and the only alternative was to push directly to Lynchburg. The dispirited, weary and famished Confederates dropped out of ranks constantly as their lines straggled along the wretched roads, until less than ten thousand remained when they reached Appomattox Courthouse. But they stood ready in their pitiable condition to give batt
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ops marched in and gazed upon the funeral pile of Southern hopes. In the meanwhile General Lee, with the remnant of his army, was struggling through deep and miry roads towards Farmville. He hoped to be able to reach Danville and establish a new defensive line along the Roanoke and Dan rivers, but the Federals, fresh and well-equipped, moving rapidly with heavy cavalry forces by parallel roads on his left, cut off that line of retreat, and the only alternative was to push directly to Lynchburg. The dispirited, weary and famished Confederates dropped out of ranks constantly as their lines straggled along the wretched roads, until less than ten thousand remained when they reached Appomattox Courthouse. But they stood ready in their pitiable condition to give battle at the signal of their Chief to the powerful army that was closing around them. Those who were of that band of heroes know with what bitterness of grief they learned that their last line of retreat was cut off, an
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 26
flushed with victory, moving from th. South under Gen. Sherman. In the midst of disasters, and under the thickening gloom of war clouds, the people of the South lifted up their voice to Him that ruleth the nations. The President, in accordance with a resolution of the Confederate Congress, appointed the 10th day of March as a day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer, with thanksgiving. In the spirit of a Christian patriot he addressed his proclamation to the suffering people of the Confederate States: It is our solemn duty, at all times, and more especially in a season of public trial and adversity, to acknowledge our dependence on His mercy, and to bow in humble submission before His footstool, confessing our manifold sins, supplicating His gracious pardon, imploring His divine help, and devoutly rendering thanks for the many and great blessings which he has vouchsafed to us. Let the hearts of our people turn contritely and trustfully unto God; let us recognize in his ch
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ern homes. The truly devout spirit that pervaded the armies of the South in the last days of the war could not be more fully shown than in the following resolutions adopted by Benning's, Bryan's, Wofford's, Anderson's, and Evans', brigades of Georgia troops: Resolved, 1st. That we hereby acknowledge the sinfulness of our past conduct as a just and sufficient ground for the displeasure of Almighty God; and that, earnestly repenting of our sins, we are determined, by his grace, to amendture; and, in earnest supplication to God, through the mediation of his Son, Jesus Christ, we implore the forgiveness of our sins and seek the Divine favor and protection. Resolved, 2nd. That we earnestly and sincerely request our friends in Georgia to remember us in all their supplications at a throne of grace: praying that we may be enabled to continue steadfast in the foregoing resolve; that we may secure, through Divine grace, the salvation of our souls; that God may preserve our lives
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
Chapter 25: spring of 1865. We are near the end of the tremendous struggle for Southern independence. In the last month of winter the famous Hampton Roads' Conference was held between President Lincoln and the Southern Commissioners. The only terms offered were unconditional submission to the Federal authorities, and it proved an utter failure. In Richmond gloom and anxiety filled the minds of the people. The noble army of Gen. Lee, reduced to thirty thousand men, had a line forty miles long in front of Gen. Grant, with his splendidly equipped force of a hundred and fifty thousand men. Gen. Johnston, in command of the remnant of Hood's army and portions of other forces, could count only twenty-five thousand men to confront forty thousand, flushed with victory, moving from th. South under Gen. Sherman. In the midst of disasters, and under the thickening gloom of war clouds, the people of the South lifted up their voice to Him that ruleth the nations. The President, in a
Five Forks (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
evident purpose of General Grant to move his left wing far enough to the south of Petersburg to cut General Lee's most valuable railroad line induced the Confederate leader to attack the Federals on their right, near the Appomattox river. The Confederates assaulted with their usual valor, and carried two lines of works and one or two heavy forts, but the Federals massed their artillery, and poured in so terrible an enfilading fire as to compel a speedy evacuation of the captured lines. Five Forks, fought on the first of April, compelled the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond. General Lee dispatched to President Davis that his lines had been hopelessly broken, and that the city should be immediately evacuated. This sad news was received by the President as he sat in his pew on Sunday morning in St. Paul's church. That night he left the city with the members of his Cabinet and the attaches of the several departments and retired to Danville. From that place he issued a stirri
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
instrument, confirming, as far as he might, the rights of freemen. But at the late period of the war when this scheme was adopted it was not possible to put it into execution, and it may be well doubted whether at an earlier date it would have been successful. The evident purpose of General Grant to move his left wing far enough to the south of Petersburg to cut General Lee's most valuable railroad line induced the Confederate leader to attack the Federals on their right, near the Appomattox river. The Confederates assaulted with their usual valor, and carried two lines of works and one or two heavy forts, but the Federals massed their artillery, and poured in so terrible an enfilading fire as to compel a speedy evacuation of the captured lines. Five Forks, fought on the first of April, compelled the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond. General Lee dispatched to President Davis that his lines had been hopelessly broken, and that the city should be immediately evacuated. T
St. Paul's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 26
nd one or two heavy forts, but the Federals massed their artillery, and poured in so terrible an enfilading fire as to compel a speedy evacuation of the captured lines. Five Forks, fought on the first of April, compelled the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond. General Lee dispatched to President Davis that his lines had been hopelessly broken, and that the city should be immediately evacuated. This sad news was received by the President as he sat in his pew on Sunday morning in St. Paul's church. That night he left the city with the members of his Cabinet and the attaches of the several departments and retired to Danville. From that place he issued a stirring proclamation urging the Southern people to show that they were no less able to endure misfortune with fortitude than to encounter danger with courage. In a few hours after the departure of the government Richmond was in flames, and all the hopes of the Southern Confederacy were consumed in one day, as a scroll in the f
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
w on Sunday morning in St. Paul's church. That night he left the city with the members of his Cabinet and the attaches of the several departments and retired to Danville. From that place he issued a stirring proclamation urging the Southern people to show that they were no less able to endure misfortune with fortitude than to enpes. In the meanwhile General Lee, with the remnant of his army, was struggling through deep and miry roads towards Farmville. He hoped to be able to reach Danville and establish a new defensive line along the Roanoke and Dan rivers, but the Federals, fresh and well-equipped, moving rapidly with heavy cavalry forces by paralThen General Lee glanced reproachfully toward Grant, as though to say, You might have spared me this. The news of General Lee's surrender reached Mr. Davis at Danville on the 10th of April. He went thence to Greensboro, North Carolina, where he met Generals Johnston and Beauregard, both of whom assured him that in their judgme
Dan River (United States) (search for this): chapter 26
departure of the government Richmond was in flames, and all the hopes of the Southern Confederacy were consumed in one day, as a scroll in the fire. In the midst of the awful conflagration the Federal troops marched in and gazed upon the funeral pile of Southern hopes. In the meanwhile General Lee, with the remnant of his army, was struggling through deep and miry roads towards Farmville. He hoped to be able to reach Danville and establish a new defensive line along the Roanoke and Dan rivers, but the Federals, fresh and well-equipped, moving rapidly with heavy cavalry forces by parallel roads on his left, cut off that line of retreat, and the only alternative was to push directly to Lynchburg. The dispirited, weary and famished Confederates dropped out of ranks constantly as their lines straggled along the wretched roads, until less than ten thousand remained when they reached Appomattox Courthouse. But they stood ready in their pitiable condition to give battle at the sign
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