hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jesus Christ 192 2 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 150 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 110 0 Browse Search
Robert Edward Lee 81 1 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 72 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 51 1 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 40 0 Browse Search
A. W. Smith 38 2 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 38 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War. Search the whole document.

Found 29 total hits in 19 results.

1 2
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
the rebel officer; but there is one thing I do remember, and that is, that he felt the reproof so sensibly, that, after standing for a moment gazing vacantly upon the cards as he held them in his hand, and listlessly twisting the corners, he threw them over the brink, and away they went sailing and fluttering as they slowly descended to the green waters many a fathom below. The second picture is from Rev. Dr. Bellows, and was drawn by him at the Unitarian Convention which met in the city of New York in the midst of the war. He gave his views of Southern social life, and the influences proceeding from it, thus: No candid mind will deny the peculiar charm of Southern young men at College, or Southern young women in society. How far race and climate, independent of servile institutions, may have produced the Southern chivalric spirit and manner, I will not here consider. But one may as well deny the small feet and hands of that people, as deny a certain inbred habit of comman
College (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
and listlessly twisting the corners, he threw them over the brink, and away they went sailing and fluttering as they slowly descended to the green waters many a fathom below. The second picture is from Rev. Dr. Bellows, and was drawn by him at the Unitarian Convention which met in the city of New York in the midst of the war. He gave his views of Southern social life, and the influences proceeding from it, thus: No candid mind will deny the peculiar charm of Southern young men at College, or Southern young women in society. How far race and climate, independent of servile institutions, may have produced the Southern chivalric spirit and manner, I will not here consider. But one may as well deny the small feet and hands of that people, as deny a certain inbred habit of command; a contempt of life in defence of honor or class; a talent for political life, and an easy control of inferiors. Nor is this merely an external and flashy heroism. It is real. It showed itself in
France (France) (search for this): chapter 3
; a contempt of life in defence of honor or class; a talent for political life, and an easy control of inferiors. Nor is this merely an external and flashy heroism. It is real. It showed itself in Congress early, and always by the courage, eloquence, skill and success with which it controlled majorities. It showed itself in the social life of Washington, by the grace, fascination and ease, the free and charming hospitality by which it governed society. It now shows itself in England and France, by the success with which it manages the courts and the circles of literature and fashion in both countries. It shows itself in this war, in the orders and proclamations of its generals, in the messages of the rebel Congress, and the essential good breeding and humanity (contrary to a diligently encouraged public impression) with which it not seldom divides its medical stores, and gives our sick and wounded as favorable care as it is able to extend to its own. It exceeds us at this moment
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
wd like the mournful sounds of the passing breeze through the lofty pines of the distant forest. The intelligence and social position of the Confederate soldiers were higher than we usually find in large bodies of troops. The private at home was often equal, and sometimes superior in social status to the officer that led him, and did not forget the claims of good breeding after he entered the army. I am proud to say it for Confederate soldiers, said the venerable Dr. Lovick Pierce, of Georgia, that for a long time while travelling with hundreds and thousands of them on all the railroads used for transportation, I have heard less profane language issuing from them than I have ever heard from any promiscuous crowd of travellers in all my journeyings. It is a well-earned fame, and deserves an imperishable record. Most of them seem to belong to the gentleman stock. Said the Rev. J. M. Atkinson: The talent, the energy, patriotism-and now, it would seem, the piety of the country
Chapter 2: subjects of the revival. There is a strongly marked difference between armies of invasion and armies of defence. The former are often mere bands of butchers following at the heels of some ambitious leader. But when men fight for country, kindred, and home, they bear a moral character that lifts them above mercenary motives. Soldiers may fight bravely for glory, or for gain. We should not underrate the valor of the men that bore the standards of Alexander, Caesar, and Napoleon, to so many victories; but take from such soldiers the esprit du corps, and you have left no pure and high inspiration which makes it sweet to die for one's country. In our war the Northern people fought, as they declared, to maintain the Union as it came from the hands of the fathers; the Southern people fought for the right of self-government. The war was brought to our doors, and was waged against us with the most determined and relentless spirit. Our people were thoroughly aroused,
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 3
them, nor were the words of prayer a strange language. It was home-like to meet for the worship of God, and not unfrequently the same minister whom they had known in their distant homes lifted up his voice among them in the wilderness, and called them to repentance. How often were scenes like the following witnessed among the rough-looking men in gray jackets, who crowded the log chapels to hear the glad tidings of salvation. Rev. Dr. Sehon, writing of his labors among the soldiers in General Lee's army, says: A most interesting incident occurred during the exercises of the evening: A request was made for a Bible for the stand. Several were ready to respond. The book was received from a tall and interesting looking young man. I noticed his large blue eyes and attractive face as he came forward and placed the holy book before me. Instantly his home rose before me. I fancied how father, mother, brothers, sisters, felt when he left, and how they thought of and prayed for h
ever. I do not remember who the soldier was that exhibited the pack of cards to the rebel officer; but there is one thing I do remember, and that is, that he felt the reproof so sensibly, that, after standing for a moment gazing vacantly upon the cards as he held them in his hand, and listlessly twisting the corners, he threw them over the brink, and away they went sailing and fluttering as they slowly descended to the green waters many a fathom below. The second picture is from Rev. Dr. Bellows, and was drawn by him at the Unitarian Convention which met in the city of New York in the midst of the war. He gave his views of Southern social life, and the influences proceeding from it, thus: No candid mind will deny the peculiar charm of Southern young men at College, or Southern young women in society. How far race and climate, independent of servile institutions, may have produced the Southern chivalric spirit and manner, I will not here consider. But one may as well de
McClellan (search for this): chapter 3
end to its own. It exceeds us at this moment in the possession of ambulance corps. I think the war must have increased the respect felt by the North for the South. Its miraculous resources, the bravery of its troops, their patience under hardships, their unshrinking firmness in the desperate position they have assumed, the wonderful success with which they have extemporized manufactures and munitions of war, and kept themselves in relation with the world in spite of our magnificent blockade; the elasticity with which they have risen from defeat, and the courage they have shown in threatening again and again our capital, and even our interior, cannot fail to extort an unwilling admiration and respect. Well is Gen. McClellan reported to have said (privately), as he watched their obstinate fighting at Antietam, and saw them retiring in perfect order in the midst of the most frightful carnage: What terrible neighbors these would be! We must conquer them, or they will conquer us!
Alexander (search for this): chapter 3
Chapter 2: subjects of the revival. There is a strongly marked difference between armies of invasion and armies of defence. The former are often mere bands of butchers following at the heels of some ambitious leader. But when men fight for country, kindred, and home, they bear a moral character that lifts them above mercenary motives. Soldiers may fight bravely for glory, or for gain. We should not underrate the valor of the men that bore the standards of Alexander, Caesar, and Napoleon, to so many victories; but take from such soldiers the esprit du corps, and you have left no pure and high inspiration which makes it sweet to die for one's country. In our war the Northern people fought, as they declared, to maintain the Union as it came from the hands of the fathers; the Southern people fought for the right of self-government. The war was brought to our doors, and was waged against us with the most determined and relentless spirit. Our people were thoroughly aroused,
Lovick Pierce (search for this): chapter 3
that weeping crowd like the mournful sounds of the passing breeze through the lofty pines of the distant forest. The intelligence and social position of the Confederate soldiers were higher than we usually find in large bodies of troops. The private at home was often equal, and sometimes superior in social status to the officer that led him, and did not forget the claims of good breeding after he entered the army. I am proud to say it for Confederate soldiers, said the venerable Dr. Lovick Pierce, of Georgia, that for a long time while travelling with hundreds and thousands of them on all the railroads used for transportation, I have heard less profane language issuing from them than I have ever heard from any promiscuous crowd of travellers in all my journeyings. It is a well-earned fame, and deserves an imperishable record. Most of them seem to belong to the gentleman stock. Said the Rev. J. M. Atkinson: The talent, the energy, patriotism-and now, it would seem, the piet
1 2